Thanks for visiting us!

Badminton Central is a free community for fans of badminton! If you find anything useful here please consider registering to see more content and get involved with our great community users, it takes less than 15 seconds! Everybody is welcome here.

Click here for a FREE account!

Lunge technique - landing with the heel

Discussion in 'Techniques / Training' started by catman, Jan 18, 2014.

  1. catman

    catman Regular Member

    Joined:
    Apr 21, 2005
    Messages:
    268
    Likes Received:
    1
    Location:
    Toronto, Canada
    I've been looking at some videos on footwork and they say when lunging land on your heels and roll forward.

    Isn't landing on the heel bad for the body? I read the foot is designed in such a way that the forefoot should be the first to hit the ground so it can absorb most of the shock. If the heel hits the ground then the shock is transferred up the leg to the knees and hips.

    If anyone can shed light on this, it would be much appreciated.
     
  2. kwun

    kwun Administrator

    Joined:
    Apr 24, 2002
    Messages:
    39,269
    Likes Received:
    535
    Occupation:
    BC Janitor
    Location:
    Santa Clara, CA, USA
    forefoot landing is more for running, when the foot lands during running, the leg is around perpendicular to the ground. (at least for runners with the "proper" technique) so landing on forefoot make sense. the arch of the feet is what is buffering the shock.

    bad runners lands on the heel.

    however, for lunge, the leg is around 45 degree from the ground, and the sponginess of the forefoot/arch isn't that useful at that angle.
     
  3. sautom88

    sautom88 Regular Member

    Joined:
    Jun 23, 2011
    Messages:
    538
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    surabaya, indonesia
    Moreover, that's where expensive shoes are worth their prices. They are much more supportive and somehow minimizes the movements and shocks transferred to yr ankles.;)
     
  4. catman

    catman Regular Member

    Joined:
    Apr 21, 2005
    Messages:
    268
    Likes Received:
    1
    Location:
    Toronto, Canada
    This question came to mind when I came across barefoot running videos on youtube. They were claiming running shoes were causing foot problems.
     
  5. visor

    visor Regular Member

    Joined:
    Dec 7, 2009
    Messages:
    13,508
    Likes Received:
    258
    Location:
    Vancouver, BC
    as kwun says, just simple biomechanics defines the difference in how you land on your feet on a lunge vs after a jump smash for eg.

    lunge: land on heel first. if you try landing on your forefoot, you'll likely twist your ankle, so don't!

    jump smash: land on forefoot first. if you try landing on your heels, you'll transfer shock to your knees and spine
     
  6. catman

    catman Regular Member

    Joined:
    Apr 21, 2005
    Messages:
    268
    Likes Received:
    1
    Location:
    Toronto, Canada
    Is there another movement that can be used other than the lunge to replace the lunge. I am trying to avoid landing on my heel.

    But as kwun said - landing on an angle will reduce the force that is being placed on the heel.
     
  7. kwun

    kwun Administrator

    Joined:
    Apr 24, 2002
    Messages:
    39,269
    Likes Received:
    535
    Occupation:
    BC Janitor
    Location:
    Santa Clara, CA, USA
    i think you might have misunderstood me.

    i should have elaborated on my last sentence:

    however, for lunge, the leg is around 45 degree from the ground, and the sponginess of the forefoot/arch isn't that useful at that angle. therefore, landing on the heel is the only possible way. the key is to land on the heel and roll the rest of the feet (forefoot) forward. this provides some small buffering due to the biomechanics of the feet.

     
  8. catman

    catman Regular Member

    Joined:
    Apr 21, 2005
    Messages:
    268
    Likes Received:
    1
    Location:
    Toronto, Canada
    I understood what you were saying. I'm just trying to see if there is a way to avoid the heel strike all together in trying to reach the shuttle.
     
  9. pBmMalaysia

    pBmMalaysia Regular Member

    Joined:
    Dec 15, 2009
    Messages:
    4,748
    Likes Received:
    0
    Occupation:
    badminton coach
    Location:
    Kuching, Malaysia, Malaysia
    There is a way! But it comes in as a joke only so not practical, that is to throw yourself around that area to lift the shuttle LOL. Joke aside, there is only one way of lunging - heel first then bent knee slightly. From there, your forefoot would then be automatically flat on the floor. This footwork also applies to blocking a side smash. Only use your forefoot to move to the net area when you are near such as taping or receiving low service. :)
     
  10. Cheung

    Cheung Moderator

    Joined:
    Apr 25, 2002
    Messages:
    16,250
    Likes Received:
    33
    Occupation:
    wannabe badminton phototaker
    Location:
    Outside the box
    Yes. Land how you want with your lunge foot and take an extra step forward with the other foot. It would not be efficient movement for a game but you do see it sometimes done.
     
  11. captaincook

    captaincook Regular Member

    Joined:
    Mar 23, 2012
    Messages:
    272
    Likes Received:
    0
    Occupation:
    captain
    Location:
    New York
    If you don't use your foot as stated by Kwun... then you will land on your belly. We call that diving, not lunging. It is used by professional players too....lol.

    But seriously, if you lunge and land on your forefoot, you may hurt your ankle. If you lunge and land with 90 degree and on forefoot, you pay the price with your knee.

    Not sure why you are avoiding the heel..... maybe a good pair of shoes with better cushioning at the heel?
     
  12. 0ozafo0

    0ozafo0 Regular Member

    Joined:
    Jul 21, 2007
    Messages:
    239
    Likes Received:
    10
    Location:
    Parents' basement
    I used to lunge with forefoot, and that's a bad idea.
    If you don't break your ankle while doing that, you end up with some pretty terrible knee pain and shin splints. This is caused by improper loading on the leg muscles, namely your quadriceps. Your quads will build up tightness from the loading and put a immense amount of pressure on the ligimants surrounding your knee (patella to be specific).

    Associated problems can be tearing of the ACL, LCL, and tendonitis of all sorts in your knee.

    Source: roommate's a physiotherapist
     
  13. catman

    catman Regular Member

    Joined:
    Apr 21, 2005
    Messages:
    268
    Likes Received:
    1
    Location:
    Toronto, Canada
    Thanks everyone - I understand the Lunge - requires heel to touch down first knee back.
    I was thinking perhaps there is another move that could accomplish the same result without lunging. Cheung suggestion above sounds interesting. Again, I'm only a recreational player - so I'd rather save my body than have the most efficient movement.
     
  14. SmashAndDash

    SmashAndDash Regular Member

    Joined:
    Dec 8, 2013
    Messages:
    50
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    California
    ^
    If you really want to avoid lunging, then yes, just take an extra step with your non racket leg after landing on the racket leg, as Cheung suggested. Basically this would be like if you were jogging, and then decided to stop using two steps: racket leg, then nonracket leg. Or I suppose, you could land hhowever you like if you're not going to bother with lunging.

    IMO, I don't think you'll hurt yourself playing recreationally with lunges unless
    1. You take very deep lunges
    2. You land very hard (either you are heavy, or you don't have the muscle control to land softly)

    If you decide to always land without lunging, you're basically restricting yourself from being able to reach the really low shots (you'll always be upright, because you don't lunge). If you try to catch low shots, you'll end up reaching by bending your back (injury risk!) instead of getting low with a lunge. Really, even on the recreational level, this sport requires lots of stop-and-go acceleration/negative acceleration, and those forces will impact somewhere on the body—you can't avoid it.
     
  15. visor

    visor Regular Member

    Joined:
    Dec 7, 2009
    Messages:
    13,508
    Likes Received:
    258
    Location:
    Vancouver, BC
    Just out of curiosity, what kind of shoes are you wearing to play with, such that you don't want to land on your heel?
     
  16. catman

    catman Regular Member

    Joined:
    Apr 21, 2005
    Messages:
    268
    Likes Received:
    1
    Location:
    Toronto, Canada
    I end up lunging because I'm late getting to the shuttle - mostly on drops at the net. But I don't land softly, I didn't even realize you can land softly on a lunge. I am about 20lbs over weight. I need to investigate lunging technique if I'm supposed to land it softly. Thanks.
     
  17. catman

    catman Regular Member

    Joined:
    Apr 21, 2005
    Messages:
    268
    Likes Received:
    1
    Location:
    Toronto, Canada
    I play badminton using Mizuno Wave - I believe these are Volleyball shoes - I find they have more cushioning than Badminton shoes and last longer. As I mentioned before the barefoot runners were saying - heel is not meant be used to make contact with the ground first - so I was trying to use the feet the way it's designed to be used (I'm not sure - not a doctor)
     
  18. Cheung

    Cheung Moderator

    Joined:
    Apr 25, 2002
    Messages:
    16,250
    Likes Received:
    33
    Occupation:
    wannabe badminton phototaker
    Location:
    Outside the box
    My kids tend to land hard with the leading foot and with the foot turned inwards. I am working on correcting these. Trying to work in the concept of after the placement of the lunge, the knee and muscles act like a spring to absorb the force.
     
  19. visor

    visor Regular Member

    Joined:
    Dec 7, 2009
    Messages:
    13,508
    Likes Received:
    258
    Location:
    Vancouver, BC
    catman, if you've seen fencing, you'll understand how a lunge is performed. Go watch it on YouTube if you haven't.
     
  20. SmashAndDash

    SmashAndDash Regular Member

    Joined:
    Dec 8, 2013
    Messages:
    50
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    California
    I'll have to look up the appropriate articles/studies, but landing on the midfoot/forefoot is only "better" in the context of running. A natural/healthy walking gait has the heel-to-toe roll we want to do in lunges. That heel-toe roll does absorb shock. (I'll be back with articles/studies, if you want)

    The "proper" running gait and walking gait are very different, because the forces involved are different. The forces in lunging in badminton are also different from running. When you run, you land and the push to propel yourself forward. In badminton, you lunge to stop movement, and the recovery movement is separate
     

Share This Page