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making homemade temporary net posts (or buying cheap ones)

Discussion in 'Badminton Rackets / Equipment' started by sillygirl_bad, Apr 9, 2007.

  1. sillygirl_bad

    sillygirl_bad New Member

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    anybody have ideas on constructing a cheap temporary net post or system for indoor play?

    I have access to an indoor racquetball court that would allow me to set up a net as long as I don't drill any holes on the walls or floor, or leave any permanent marks. plus, I wouldn't be able to store the net system at the building of the racquetball court.

    these restrictions prevent me from using a solution that I see several local badminton clubs use who rent time at school gyms, but can't afford to buy real net systems. instead they use two wooden sticks nailed into an upside T, which are held up by the tension created by the net's string that runs through the top and that is tied down to the bleachers or some screws on the wall that the school drilled for a different purpose.

    Yonex has a Mini Portable Recreational Net System (USD$ 100 online) that is not tournament size.

    Collegiate Pacific sells a base (USD $45 online) and telescopic pole (USD $25 online), but its too expensive because I have to buy two of them and also add shipping costs, and the customer reviews for that company's products are uniformly poor and hostile.

    various companies sell indoor volleyball poles that roll away on wheels, but cost over USD $250 each and they wouldn't fit in a car.

    currently, my temporary solution is using two pieces of long wardrobe shelves, leaning them at an angle against wall to hold down the strings on either side of the net, and holding the nets and shelves in place with weight lifting weights at the base. but the net is very sensitive to any strong hits to the net, when the whole assembly falls down easily.

    I would love to just buy a cheap system, or to construct a better one, for less than USD $100 somewhere online. any ideas? I can't believe how much time I have spent thinking about solutions, but then my friends and I would have a badminton court all to ourselves!
     
  2. LazyBuddy

    LazyBuddy Regular Member

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    If in your case, I will go with the "back door" solution, rather than purchase anything. The problem I see in your case, is the net is too heavy, and w/o having any dependable support, there's no way you can setup it correctly.

    So, here's my "poor man's" solution. Actually, i did this when I was a young kid, who does not have any $$$. What i did, was just to use a long rope (light ones) to be taped on both sides of the wall (with proper height being measured), and try to make it as straight as possible. Along the rope, tie some string/rope/fabric pieces (about 1.5-2 feet long), this way, if the shuttle hit into the (net), the small pieces will move, and you can see it easily. Only difference is, ppl on the other side need to pick it up, as the shuttle will go through, rather than being blocked as with a net.

    Once you are done, peel off the tape, and pack the rope into your backpack. The entire setup time might be only 2 minute or so.

    If the room is too wide, 2 heavy duty chairs with wooden stick tied on the back, or your wardrobe shelves can be used to replace the wall. Just tape or tie the rope around the sticks. The key is to make the rope and the attached pieces to be light enough, so, the center won't be dragged down too low.

    It's not the best solustion for sure, but much cheaper, easier and safer. ;)
     
  3. Kelvin

    Kelvin Regular Member

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    I had a design a long time ago, which incorporates the iron plates (weights)which Sillygirl had mentioned.

    I apologize, I'm not very good at technical drawings, so here is my rendition using MS paint :eek:

    The following pictogram, shows an all wooden design.

    The main components are the anchor (box to hold the weight plates), & wooden pillar, with a hole drilled into the top for the badminton net to be strung through.
    The pillar itself is secured to the box via steel joints (dont remember the specific name of the item), that are fastened by bolts.

    The 2 protruding wood planks, are supports to prevent the net from collapsing inward, due to the weight of the net.
    These 2 planks, are interlocked via woodworking cuts, and lock themselves into the anchor to prevent movement.

    The blue planks, are optional supports, which can be incorporated into the wooden box, to help stabilize the pole against collapsing to the side, or inward toward the center.

    The circles in red, are metal casters which can be added; similar to current all metal badminton poles offered by big manufacturers such as Victor.

    The green stub, indicated in the picture, is for the net strings to be tied around as a final secured point...
    You would spin the pillar around a few times to tighten the net, and then run the loop of the net string through the protruding metal hook to secure the net.

    After that, you're off and laughing!!:D :D :D

    I did not indicate measurements because, I do not know the weight of the net; nor the amount of gravitational pull the net is having on the supports... :eek:

    The reason why wood was used as a construction material, is due to its relatively low cost, portability, and flexibility of taking them apart; by simply sliding off the 2 or 3 interlocked planks.
    (Basically put... they are collapsible)
    The main anchor can then be wheeled away, via casters attached to the outer edge of the wooden box, with the pillar as your grasping point.

    Anywho... I hope this at least gives you a good idea of how to build one.
    At least, this is what I initially thought of for a space I leased, just to play badminton in :p before i ended up having 2 holes drilled into the ground, for my poles..........

    I digress.

    Let us know how things turn out!!

    ps: save the pic, and open it up in a picture viewer, and zoom in to 200% to get a better view... sorry again for the crappy pic, I'm not a CAD artist.

    Edit: Forgot to mention... the weights, are placed into the wooden box to help anchor the post down... if the weight of the net is too great, then just add more weight.
    Cheers.
     

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    #3 Kelvin, Apr 10, 2007
    Last edited: Apr 10, 2007
  4. Kelvin

    Kelvin Regular Member

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    forgot one thing...

    The blue pieces, can also be constructed, and interlocked as a T-joint; for added strength and stability, to overlap and interlock with the V-shaped supports.

    The entire structure would be relatively light weight, and strong enough to support the weight of the badminton net; portable enough to transport in a small car. (except maybe The SMART):D

    Cheers.
     
  5. LazyBuddy

    LazyBuddy Regular Member

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    Great mech work! :)
     
  6. sillygirl_bad

    sillygirl_bad New Member

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    great ideas, thanks! I have started modifying my wardrobe shelves.

    additionally, I realized that umbrella stands for patio furniture might also work. made of cast iron, steel, or filled with concrete, they weigh as little as 20-50 lbs, and have a hole to stick in the badminton post. online prices seem to start at USD $30-40, and I would need to buy two of them.

    a cheaper substitute would be those weights used in weightlifting (the racquetball court has a nearby weight room). those weights are donut shaped, and I could stick in a wooden badminton post that is nailed / screwed to a wooden board. that would prevent the badminton post from falling over. now I just need to experiment with how heavy the weight needs to be in order to support the wooden stick.

    any comments? any other ideas? thanks again for everybody's suggestions!
     

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