Thanks for visiting us!

Badminton Central is a free community for fans of badminton! If you find anything useful here please consider registering to see more content and get involved with our great community users, it takes less than 15 seconds! Everybody is welcome here.

Click here for a FREE account!

Multiple Shuttle Feed... how do you do them?

Discussion in 'Techniques / Training' started by cappy75, Oct 16, 2004.

  1. cappy75

    cappy75 Regular Member

    Joined:
    Sep 21, 2002
    Messages:
    3,509
    Likes Received:
    11
    Occupation:
    Depot Support Representative
    Location:
    Burnaby, BC, Canada
    Here's something I hope all of you knowledgeable coaches out there could help me with. How do you make effective multi-shuttle feeds? Is there a certain way of holding rolls of shuttles in your hand to facilitate the feed? Please bear in mind that shuttles used are often not in the best condition:p.
     
  2. gerry

    gerry Regular Member

    Joined:
    Jul 21, 2002
    Messages:
    122
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    UK
    If you're right handed, just cradle between 15/20 shuttles base down in the crook of your left arm down to your hand, pick one off at a time and feed. Obviously you have to be able to hold your racket and a shuttle in the one hand to feed well.
    You should be able to feed 20 shuttles in under 20 seconds for net play.
    It Just takes practice.
     
  3. Aleik

    Aleik Regular Member

    Joined:
    Feb 8, 2003
    Messages:
    222
    Likes Received:
    0
    Occupation:
    Let's not get encumbered by detail...(is the taxma
    Location:
    U.K.
    You need a two tubes which would hold 12 shuttles each, tape them together parallel, and hollow the bottom of the tube out to just less than the diameter of a regular shuttle. This means that the shuttle at the bottom will creep out of the bottom of the tube, and you can simply pull it out (don't worry, it won't damage the shuttle).

    Now pierce a hole near the top and the bottom of one of the tubes, and thread a string through, which can be looped, or knotted at both ends. This acts as a sling which can simply be put around your right shoulder so that the tubes hang down your left flank.

    There. Now you have the option of feeding 24 shuttles with no discomfort. Just be prepared to pick them all up afterwards!

    Aleik.
     
  4. gerry

    gerry Regular Member

    Joined:
    Jul 21, 2002
    Messages:
    122
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    UK
    Aleik, sounds interesting but the shuttles won't come out by themselves so how do you get them to slip to the bottom of the tube, every tube that I've ever used needs pressure to get them out, still think it's easier and faster just to hold them in your arm.
     
  5. kwun

    kwun Administrator

    Joined:
    Apr 24, 2002
    Messages:
    39,264
    Likes Received:
    529
    Occupation:
    BC Janitor
    Location:
    Santa Clara, CA, USA
    i wonder about the same thing too.

    a poster tube with thicker diameter will work better imho.

    however, i think the ability to hold 20+ shuttles in one arm without help and still be able to feed them properly is part of the skill set of a good coach.
     
  6. gerry

    gerry Regular Member

    Joined:
    Jul 21, 2002
    Messages:
    122
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    UK
    For doubles training I can hold 35 shuttles in my arm but it sometimes feels like I'm wrestling with a snake !! ;-)

    Another advantage I think is that you can play 2+ shot drills with the same shuttle without having to hunt behind your back when you need the next shuttle, i.e. I can hold shuttles in my arm, feed one to the rearcourt, the player plays a dropshot I can then reply to the net still using the same shuttle which he can "kill" then I pull another one quickly to feed again to the rearcourt so he has to be able to respond quickly as if the "kill" was returned. It is pressure training and if you can do the above with 20 shuttles in your arm your player will certainly feel under pressure !!!

    Another point possibly is that I can move around the court with ease feeding shuttles from any part of the court quickly rather than standing in a fixed position, I'm not so sure that with something on your back it would be so easy to do, I may be wrong and am willing to be converted.
     
  7. Mag

    Mag Moderator

    Joined:
    Apr 25, 2002
    Messages:
    3,342
    Likes Received:
    0
    Occupation:
    Graphic Designer
    Location:
    Stockholm, Sweden
    Just stack the shuttles up along your non-racquet arm, cork downwards. Then pick the bottom one with your racquet-hand, let the others slide down, hold the racquet hand up high and drop the shuttle, and hit it as it falls down. The trick is to let the shuttle DROP from your racquet-hand -- this is very important. If you toss the shuttle your shots will end up anywhere.

    The rest is just as with all skills: practice, practice, practice. That's why coaches are such good feeders: they get to practice it a lot! :p
     
  8. gerry

    gerry Regular Member

    Joined:
    Jul 21, 2002
    Messages:
    122
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    UK
    Exactly Mag, I should have mentioned that....thanks

    Mind you in saying that, not too high, I find elbow height sufficient.
     
    #8 gerry, Oct 19, 2004
    Last edited: Oct 19, 2004
  9. cappy75

    cappy75 Regular Member

    Joined:
    Sep 21, 2002
    Messages:
    3,509
    Likes Received:
    11
    Occupation:
    Depot Support Representative
    Location:
    Burnaby, BC, Canada
    I had a disasterous time in my training group when it's my turn to feed the shuttles for doubles reaction drill:eek:. Didn't help that lots of the shuttles were in various stages of damage and some often get stuck together:(. Will try underhand feed with one roll of 8-10 shuttles next time and then go from there. Thanks for your help, guys:)!
     
  10. gerry

    gerry Regular Member

    Joined:
    Jul 21, 2002
    Messages:
    122
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    UK
    Yes that does happen but it can be a funny relief in a tense session.
     
  11. dlp

    dlp Regular Member

    Joined:
    Jun 19, 2002
    Messages:
    963
    Likes Received:
    0
    Occupation:
    Accountant / Coach
    Location:
    uk
    As Gerry says just pick up 15-30 shuttles in your left arm and serve under arm, you can either drop the shuttles with your left hand or pick them off one at a time with your right hand (while holding the racket) and serve them.

    If you want to feed attacking shots quicker overhand hold 4-5 shuttles at a time in left hand and pick them with right hand and hit downwards from above your shoulder.
     
  12. Dill

    Dill Regular Member

    Joined:
    Feb 28, 2003
    Messages:
    1,921
    Likes Received:
    0
    Occupation:
    Lazy git (my coach can verify this)
    Location:
    Glasgow, Scotland
    I found when feeding like that, using a shortened grip when hitting took my mind off the bad miss-hits and gave me more control for trying to get the one shuttle from my racket hand in the perfect position from which to hit.
     
  13. Dill

    Dill Regular Member

    Joined:
    Feb 28, 2003
    Messages:
    1,921
    Likes Received:
    0
    Occupation:
    Lazy git (my coach can verify this)
    Location:
    Glasgow, Scotland
    I was over at the academy last week where I saw a double tubed device for holding shuttles, it was made from grey tubes with a black stand where the tubes were filled with shuttles and the bottom of the tubes were at hand level for ease of picking the shuttle.

    For getting up a couple of hundred up off the floor after the feeding they just use a big wide brush, not sure if it damages the shuttles though.
     
  14. SWC_Ant

    SWC_Ant Regular Member

    Joined:
    Nov 18, 2004
    Messages:
    552
    Likes Received:
    0
    Occupation:
    Student
    Location:
    Richmond, BC; Hamilton, ON
    for people in richmond (particularly those who play at ClearOne), the coach there has 3 poster-paper rolls taped parallel and then mounted on something that looks like a camera tripod.. he can put hundreds of birdies in there, and just pluck them out one by one to do drills for his students.. they pick it up by hand (i believe) afterwards though
     
  15. FlamingJam

    FlamingJam Regular Member

    Joined:
    Jun 15, 2004
    Messages:
    119
    Likes Received:
    0
    Occupation:
    Research Student/PT Coach
    Location:
    Yorkshire, UK
    i just prefer being able to hold 20-25 shuttles in the non racket arm and as has been said use the racket arm to drop one and then hit it, i thk tryin to invent different meas is aukward in the long run , its a useful skill to have so i learnt it.

    Also find it easier to feed with a short grip usually it make hitting a dropping shuttle quicker much easier:p
     
  16. kwun

    kwun Administrator

    Joined:
    Apr 24, 2002
    Messages:
    39,264
    Likes Received:
    529
    Occupation:
    BC Janitor
    Location:
    Santa Clara, CA, USA
    reviving an old thread.

    i am starting to learn the technique to feed shuttle.

    i am doing as mentioned by a few, stacking 10-20 shuttle up my non-racket arm, pulling the bottom one from the stack using my racket hand, throw it a little and then hit it with the racket.

    i am OK with it but it was difficult to do precise placement, the issue i have is that after i pull each shuttle out with the racket hand and throw it, it usually don't have time to settle down and as a result, the orientation of the shuttlecock was pretty erratic.

    any tips to getting this right?
     
  17. Mathieu

    Mathieu Regular Member

    Joined:
    Apr 26, 2007
    Messages:
    106
    Likes Received:
    0
    Occupation:
    Student
    Location:
    Canada, Quebec
    Hi Kwun,
    Here is a good video that I found on badminton life. It starts talking about multi-shuttles feed at about 1:11 and the technique is demonstrated at 4:08 by a top canadian player. The whole video is interesting (it also talks about a drill called quarter court which is alot of fun).

    I think that its important not to hit too quickly after throwing the shuttle (as mentionned in the video). You might also find it easier if you use a shorter grip when feeding (ie holding your racket closer to the cone) as it gives you more control.

    Here is the link: http://badmintonlife.com/birds-of-a-feather-flock-together/

    Hope it helps.

    Mathieu
     
  18. kwun

    kwun Administrator

    Joined:
    Apr 24, 2002
    Messages:
    39,264
    Likes Received:
    529
    Occupation:
    BC Janitor
    Location:
    Santa Clara, CA, USA
    Mathieu, that's an informative video. i will try that tomorrow for the mutli-shuttle drills.
     
  19. jerby

    jerby Regular Member

    Joined:
    Sep 3, 2005
    Messages:
    4,049
    Likes Received:
    10
    Location:
    EU
    Nice video, it takes some getting used to, but when you can do it you can be very consistent.
    A few tips:
    -Try and be consistent in 'throwing' the shuttle of the row. I like to throw it out a bit horizontally so the shuttle doesn't have any spin on it. Because if it spins your shot can go anywhere.
    -Put your non-racketfoot in front and feed the shuttles beside you, not in front of you. Because when you hit in front of you your lifts will go in a huge ark and you lose speed. When you hit it more to the side you can play with the pace of the shot a lot more.
    -You cannot get a service fault on feeding! I see a lot of people feeding shuttle well below their waist and complain they can't feed a driveshot or a fast lift. Don't be afraid to hit it above your waistline. I know some coaches who can feed a pretty decent smashes even.
     
  20. ctjcad

    ctjcad Regular Member

    Joined:
    Sep 27, 2004
    Messages:
    19,144
    Likes Received:
    4
    Location:
    u.s.a.
    ..are you training up your boys??..;)..

    i think posts #2, #7 & #15 pretty much could give you the tips..
     

Share This Page