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Need advice on buying a stringing machine

Discussion in 'Badminton Stringing Techniques & Tools' started by Bluehinder, Apr 16, 2010.

  1. Bluehinder

    Bluehinder Regular Member

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    Hi,

    I currently string squash and tennis rackets on a Babolat Star 5, but the given the cost of the badminton conversion kit, I would like to buy a dedicated badminton stringing machine. That way I can leave my clamps and settings alone on the Star 5. It would also be nice to have something portable.

    It doesn't seem like there are too many choices out there. I take it the Eagnas ST250 and Easy 3 are the main choices. I assume the Yonex is the same machine for lots more money.

    Between the Easy 3 and ST250, which would you choose and why?

    Are the Yonex flying clamps the best available and the ones to get?

    Thanks in advance for any assistance.
     
  2. Distanc3

    Distanc3 Regular Member

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    whats your budget? ;)

    But i think conversion would be a safe bet since a decent machine will run you $500 minimum
     
  3. Bluehinder

    Bluehinder Regular Member

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    I take it then that the Eagnas ST250 or Easy 3 are not decent machines?

    The Babolat conversion kit is $400 for my Star 5.
     
  4. pexon

    pexon Regular Member

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    my little advice, dont buy Eagnas product :)
     
  5. Bluehinder

    Bluehinder Regular Member

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    I'm aware of the Eagnas reputation, but this is not a complicated electronic machine, and it's the same machine sold to Yonex. I can't imagine having too many problems with such a little machine.
     
  6. Ouchee

    Ouchee Regular Member

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    I rather get Pros pro shuttle express from W & D string in UK. $160
    UK
    Eagnas would be a piece of crap compare to your Babolat
     
  7. LazyBuddy

    LazyBuddy Regular Member

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    What's your definition for "decent"? Many very well made drop weight machines are around $200 range (2 point support), and can still be below $400 or $500, if you go with 4-6 point support.

    It's the stringer's skill which count the most, not the machine. For personal usage, I think you can stay very well below the $500 mark. :rolleyes:
     
  8. Distanc3

    Distanc3 Regular Member

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    ^ yes the definition of "decent" depends on the reader. Comparing to OP's machine (babolat star 5), under my opinion a "decent" machine for him would run around $500, consisting of similar supports, accuracy and clamps.
    Sorry for the use of the ambiguous word "decent"
     
  9. Bluehinder

    Bluehinder Regular Member

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    No offense to drop weights, but it's got to be a crank. DW are just too slow and clunky.

    I am looking for something of high quality. I think I've got it down to the Alpha Revo 4000 with the badminton clamps. $630 total. I've not seen anything better for up to the price range, though still soliciting opinions.

    I agree with you Distanc3, that's what I was thinking.
     
  10. LazyBuddy

    LazyBuddy Regular Member

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    How many badminton rackets you plan to string per week? If a few, then I doubt the "too slow" really matters any how. However, if you open a shop, that's a totally different story.

    Anyway, you are the one to make the final call. Good luck for the shopping. :p
     
  11. Bluehinder

    Bluehinder Regular Member

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    "Too slow" is a measure of how valuable is a person's time, not how many rackets are strung in a week. But your point is well taken. As I said, I've got nothing against drop weights, they are just not for me, too futzy.

    There is a reason the Prince Neos is the best selling machine of all time.
     
  12. fishmilk

    fishmilk Regular Member

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    Or a measure of a person's skill.

    I know a stringer who can do a racquet in 8 minutes with a dropweight, and probably 20 minutes on average.

    Anyway to be more helpful, how much do you value the quality of the stringjob because there's also a reason why Prince Neos are phasing out. Constant pull.
     
  13. Bluehinder

    Bluehinder Regular Member

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    Neos is not being phased out. In fact, Prince just came out with a newer version, the 1500.

    Ignorant statement about the Neos, shows you don't know anything about stringing. Countless millions of rackets have been strung on the industry standard for twenty years.
     
  14. silentheart

    silentheart Regular Member

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    Hi,
    From a person worked on Star5 before and string both tennis and badminton racquets. I would suggest you to stay with Star5 with badminton fly clamps. The only thing is some of the thinner Yonex badminton frame will need the side support which I think you can make one with some effort. You can just go out and buy a piece of wood and cut it into the side support holder shape and make the gap smaller. I did that before on the Star5. Another problem I encounter is the n/s post. You need to pretty much stretch to max to mount a badminton racquet. Otherwise, I strung up badminton racquets on Star5 without problem.
    Good luck
     
  15. tenchi

    tenchi Regular Member

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    Wow. 8 minutes! And that too on a drop weight!! :eek:

    You should post a youtube video. I'm sure it'll be a hit. :)



     
  16. fishmilk

    fishmilk Regular Member

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    I meant the 1000 is being phased out. You didn't specify the model so I didn't either, it was just assumed when you said best selling machine of all time. The fact that they made the 1500 model means that most likely the 1000 will eventually be phased out.

    Just because millions of racquets have been strung on it doesn't make it the industry standard today. All professional tennis players want their racquets done on ECP and all pro-shops I know of that are profitable have gone to electronic machines as well. Nostalgia isn't going to make it the industry standard again.

    Even if I didn't know anything about different stringing machines, hardly gives you the right to question my ability as a stringer. I just have to know mine and I do quite well. Ignorant one seems to be yourself though, because you clearly haven't addressed the issue I brought up of constant pull. Just didn't want a fellow stringer to buy a machine that they wouldn't be fully satisfied with as I've gone down that route already.
     
  17. LazyBuddy

    LazyBuddy Regular Member

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    For the nature of drop weight, if you turbo through, either you damage the string (due to friction -> heat), or you have low quality job (weight+leveler needs time to settle to be horizontal). If 8 minutes it is, then 99% the job will suffer both from above. :cool:

    Plus, I assume the above time did not count the pre-wave. :rolleyes:
     
  18. Pete LSD

    Pete LSD Regular Member

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    GrandMaster LB get time for posting? :D Isn't he very busy with the other half now? :D
     
  19. Bluehinder

    Bluehinder Regular Member

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    I stand by my statement, you ovbiously don't know much about stringing outside outside of your little world. Everyone in the industry knows that while constant pull machines have their advantages, millions of people have strung with crank machines with great success. An experienced stringer can string on either machine, it's just a matter of getting to know your clients and your budget. If you knew anything about pro athletes you would know they are the least educated about string methods. They just want something reproducable, and that can be done on either machine. A big constant pull machine like a Babolat appeals visually to the walk in retail amateur client.

    I string on a Star 5 because I prefer the advantages of a constant pull machine, but I would never denegrate my fellow stringers who prefer the speed and simplicity of a Neos 1000.

    No serious volume stringer would use a drop weight machine. If you string at tournaments you would see that it's either a constant pull machine or a prince Neos, never a drop weight.

    I'd be the first to say that I can't produce a better product with my Star 5 than a great stringer with a good crank like a Neos. I think you need to stick to your drop weights at home stringing your own rackets. I'm sure you can do a good job. Just don't expect serious players to take you seriously.

    Are you a member of the Untied States Racquet Stringers Association? Are you even certified to string rackuets? Get an education in stringing and then come back and talk to us about stringing.
     
  20. fishmilk

    fishmilk Regular Member

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    Of your entire rant, the bolded text was the only thing I could find that wasn't entirely your skewed opinion or bogus all together.

    FYI I own both a dropweight and ECP. I use the dropweight 90% of the time because it's simple and the results are the best. The ECP is just for show and if I really need to crank out racquets. Every week I have "serious players" who have had enough of their jobs being done on a manual and loving my string jobs because of constant pull and probably my attention to detail.

    It's funny how you assume I only have a dropweight because I advocate it. Or being a member of USRSA makes you a good stringer. Or all pros have no clue about stringing. Or serious players won't go to a stringer using drop weight.

    I think that'll be my cue to stay out of this thread because clearly you don't like to reason and you don't like to hear other opinions so this will get nowhere. BCF has always been a friendly community for me so I'll leave it that way. It just makes me wonder why you even bothered to post on a forum when you seem to prefer to reject rather than listen to opinions, and you prefer to put down other people who are taking time out of their lives to give you a hand, just because they respectfully disagree with your opinions.
     

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