Thanks for visiting us!

Badminton Central is a free community for fans of badminton! If you find anything useful here please consider registering to see more content and get involved with our great community users, it takes less than 15 seconds! Everybody is welcome here.

Click here for a FREE account!

New Cross Weaving Technique and the SP eStringer DG

Discussion in 'Badminton Stringing Techniques & Tools' started by singnflip4life, Aug 27, 2010.

  1. singnflip4life

    singnflip4life Regular Member

    Joined:
    Mar 25, 2009
    Messages:
    1,213
    Likes Received:
    0
    Occupation:
    Full Time Student
    Location:
    Davis, CA
    So I stumbled upon this video while browsing a tennis forum, and its pretty cool in making your crosses go faster unless you're a master stringer. Here's the link for the tennis forum, the links to the videos are contained there.

    http://tt.tennis-warehouse.com/showthread.php?t=344134

    Also, I just purchased a used mint Silent Partner eStringer DG for $600 :)

    Never used, but 3 years old. I just want to know if anyone has had any specific experience with using this machine for badminton, and if I really need the SP badminton supports.
     
  2. bazzaman

    bazzaman Regular Member

    Joined:
    Jul 3, 2010
    Messages:
    201
    Likes Received:
    0
    Occupation:
    IT
    Location:
    HK
    Since badminton strings are thinner and closer together you're gonna find it hard to thread each cross this way.

    You end up pulling the string with your fingers in between the mains and it starts to hurt after a few string sessions

    So the best advice? get your younger sister or daughter to prestring the crosses :)
     
  3. kwun

    kwun Administrator

    Joined:
    Apr 24, 2002
    Messages:
    39,285
    Likes Received:
    552
    Occupation:
    BC Janitor
    Location:
    Santa Clara, CA, USA
    interesting.

    the advantage is that it 1/2 the amount of weaving that needs to be done (1/2 because it only works on alternate strings).

    the advantage isn't as much as it seems because it does take time to loop the string. within which time an experienced stringer would already have weaved it through already.

    it does save some finger sore i guess.
     
  4. singnflip4life

    singnflip4life Regular Member

    Joined:
    Mar 25, 2009
    Messages:
    1,213
    Likes Received:
    0
    Occupation:
    Full Time Student
    Location:
    Davis, CA
    The looped string tool only needs to be made once, then it can be used over and over and over again. I believe it would help beginners more than experts, but can still be of use unless you're one of the few who can string a mounted racket in under 20min and get a decent stringjob out of it.
     
  5. kwun

    kwun Administrator

    Joined:
    Apr 24, 2002
    Messages:
    39,285
    Likes Received:
    552
    Occupation:
    BC Janitor
    Location:
    Santa Clara, CA, USA
    we need someone to try it. :D
     
  6. singnflip4life

    singnflip4life Regular Member

    Joined:
    Mar 25, 2009
    Messages:
    1,213
    Likes Received:
    0
    Occupation:
    Full Time Student
    Location:
    Davis, CA
    I would, but I don't have video recording equipment, just an iPhone. I already use the technique for tennis stringing. Got me down from an hour to 40min, including mounting time.
     
  7. Mark A

    Mark A Regular Member

    Joined:
    Sep 2, 2005
    Messages:
    6,274
    Likes Received:
    136
    Occupation:
    Warehouse dogsbody, Stringer, Panda reseller,
    Location:
    St Helens, UK
    OK - that's cheating (but I'm definitely going to try it) - for the price of two weaves you can get 11 or 12 for free. I can get mains in in about 7 minutes, but crosses really chuck a spanner in the works for me - big hands and no dexterity:).
     
  8. Distanc3

    Distanc3 Regular Member

    Joined:
    Apr 2, 2006
    Messages:
    612
    Likes Received:
    0
    Occupation:
    stringer for community centers
    Location:
    vancouver
    its not that bad of a technique but it does take practice to cut time. i find it a hassle when i get to the the last main and i just remove the whole "mechanism" and go by hand. =T
     
  9. silentheart

    silentheart Regular Member

    Joined:
    Oct 31, 2004
    Messages:
    4,214
    Likes Received:
    18
    Location:
    USA
    Interesting. As Kwun mentioned, it will help 1/2 of crosses. But it is 1/2 of crosses and saving 5 sec on every other cross. That will take out about 50 sec at the most for experienced stringers. It will take extra 15~20 sec to set it up. My guess is it will save me about 30~40 sec per racquet.
     
  10. silentheart

    silentheart Regular Member

    Joined:
    Oct 31, 2004
    Messages:
    4,214
    Likes Received:
    18
    Location:
    USA
    I tried it last night. I am not sure if any one experience similar problems.
    1) to hold the tip of the string, you need to twist the white guild rope. Once it is through and string is removed, the twist is back and you spend a little time to insert the tip back in on the next time.
    2) If the tip is too short, the guild rope slip a couple time during the pull and I have to weave the rest of the string.
    3) The twist on the guild rope will run over to the end and lose the grip.
     
  11. singnflip4life

    singnflip4life Regular Member

    Joined:
    Mar 25, 2009
    Messages:
    1,213
    Likes Received:
    0
    Occupation:
    Full Time Student
    Location:
    Davis, CA
    Since this technique was developed for tennis, it needs a bit of a modification for badminton. The tensions for tennis are high enough and tennis string is stiff enough that it doesn't slip out of the simple thread loops. For badminton, I think you need to do the following:

    1. Insert string through grommet
    2. Insert tip of string through end of pulling loop
    3. Hold string tip with one hand, and pull the thread loop with the other
    4. Once string is woven, pull remaining string through, and pull through grommet, tension and clamp.
    5. Weave next cross, and as you pull the slack, pull the thread loop as well. Assuming you've attached one end to the machine, there shouldn't be a fear of overpulling.
    6. Start at step 1 again :)

    this should eliminate the need for the twist, and the problem of losing the string mid-pullweave
     

Share This Page