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No. of knots

Discussion in 'Badminton Stringing Techniques & Tools' started by Byro-Nenium, Feb 3, 2001.

  1. Byro-Nenium

    Byro-Nenium Regular Member

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    I was just wondering, are there any people out there who string rackets? Kwun i think. I'm not sure, but i was in the badminton shop today getting my racket restrung. I was just wondering, is it true that badminton rackets are normally strung with 4 knots? Some say 2, some say 3 and some say 4. What are the advantages and disadvantages of each one.

    thanx for all replies
     
  2. shaun

    shaun Regular Member

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    i dunno anything about the knots, but my airblade 900 has 2 knots....then when i got my prince axis 70 restrung, it had 4....and the iso 95 vf i previously had also had 4 knots
     
  3. Cheung

    Cheung Moderator

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    How can you string a racquet with three knots? One piece stringing will give you two ends and thus two knots. Two piece stringing gives you four ends and hence four knots to tie. Three?

    My experience is that one piece stringing takes longer because of working with a longer length of string that needs to be pulled through. No discernable advantage in playability for me.
     
  4. Joey

    Joey Guest

    I string racquets. All yonex badminton racquets require two piece stringing . This will make your racquet have 4 knots. The more knots the more tension loss. Each brand of racquets has different stringing requirements.
     
  5. Cheung

    Cheung Moderator

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    Why does four knots mean more tension loss compared to two knots?
     
  6. Joey

    Joey Guest

    After clamping the last string there is an inch or two between where the clamp is holding tension and where the knot is tied with no tension. A slight loss of tension occurs. Therefore the more knots you have the more tension loss.
     
  7. Cheung

    Cheung Moderator

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    I would expect the loss of tension would therefore be at the periphery of the racquet rather than affect the centre i.e. the sweet spot. Am I correct?
     
  8. cooler

    cooler Regular Member

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    dont worry about cheung. It's details over nothing.
     
  9. Cheung

    Cheung Moderator

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    Hah,

    I'm curious because I didn't think it made a difference. We should be aiming to use the sweet spot, right? :eek:)
     
  10. Cheung

    Cheung Moderator

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    Hey,

    Let's go back to this statement from the "16kg?" post by Kwun way back in Oct
    Am I vindicated?

    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    got this from badmintonasia, interviewing one of the stringers for the Danish team:

    "How long does it take to string a racket ? " Normally, it would take
    me around 20 minutes each, but some players want such a high
    weight that it can take over 90 minutes. For instance, Jens Eriksen,
    the Danish double player ranked in the top five in the world uses
    a weight of 16 kg. But the frame wouldn't hold it so I put the 16
    KGs in the Centre of the racket then I have to put on a lower
    weight as the strings get closer to the frame. And this takes some
    time and "doigté" ""

    16kg? that's 35lb tension. pretty scary. 20mins a racket is also pretty impressive. i talked to a stringer in HK, he said 20 mins can be achieved, but he will have to put in extra effort.

    kwun

    ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
     
  11. Mag

    Mag Moderator

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    Jens Eriksen

    Sorry, a bit off topic but I just wanted to comment:

    I've watched some doubles matches with Jens Eriksen and Jesper Larsen on video. They make an extremely aggressive pair. Jens breaks 2-3 racquets each match (due to string failure). That's the price you pay for such high tension...
     
  12. Cheung

    Cheung Moderator

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    Re: Jens Eriksen

    I wonder if he really strings that tightly when training. The racquets would have to be continually restrung on an almost daily basis.
     
  13. Dude

    Dude Guest

    Re: Jens Eriksen

    2 knots = 1 piece of string (longway first and then short way - referring to head of the racquet)
    4 knots = 2 pieces of strings (1 for horizontal & 1 for vertical)

    no other variation of number of "knots" in conventional stringing of badminton racquets.

    I disagree with some racquets requiring certain number of knots to string. All racquets can be strung with single piece of string or two pieces of strings. (You just cut off the single string after long way and start on short way)

    As for adjusting tension of the string so that the sweet spot will have more "tension," I don't see how this is possible??? (NOTE that I am NOT saying that this is impossible)
    All my stringing experience (roughly about 1300 racquets) tell me that if you "DRASTICALLY" change tension in mid-string for certain parts of the frame, the frame will break or warp. (though not usually during stringing - because the frame of the racquet is secured - but when you finish and unsecure the racquet from the stringing machine) And yes I have tried it and have had racquest warp and/or break every time (kinda like morphing music video from michael jackson).

    I would guess about 3-5 lb adjustment at lower ceiling tension (max of about 25lbs) can be done with variable tension stringing but at high tension adjusting tension during mid-string, in my experience, is junking your racquet.
     
  14. Mag

    Mag Moderator

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    Re: Jens Eriksen

    Mmm... I guess you want the same feel in your racquet in training and competition, so I assume he does use the same tension. On the other hand, maybe he doesn't play quite as hard and during training?

    Being one of the absolutely top Danish players, I assume that if he needs restringing on a daily basis, that's not a problem.
     

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