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Not applying techniques during rallies

Discussion in 'Techniques / Training' started by kbase, Jun 23, 2014.

  1. kbase

    kbase Regular Member

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    Hi all !

    I learned the proper techniques through regular coaching. But I am not able to apply those techniques because my mind always concentrates to win rallies rather than proper playing. I play well but still not playing to full potential as I am not able to apply in mind and then transform those to the game. Please guide as how to focus learned techniques in mind and apply during the course of the game.

    Thanks
     
  2. |_Footwork_|

    |_Footwork_| Regular Member

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    I don't understand the question!

    If you want to win rallies, you have to play with good technique.
    Better technique means better shots, means higher likelihood to win.

    There is no tradeoff between "technique vs. winning", they go hand in hand!
     
  3. kbase

    kbase Regular Member

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    Thanks for the reply. I put it very simple.

    I am not applying what I have learned during the course of the game
     
  4. |_Footwork_|

    |_Footwork_| Regular Member

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    Well, then you should practise more. Simple as that. Automatisms need time to be established...
     
  5. cyberlettuce

    cyberlettuce Regular Member

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    Hmm I see what Kbase is saying. Basically when he plays competitive games he reverts back to his old habits of poor technique rather than the stuff he has been working on with his coach. I get the same problem sometimes. Part of this comes from me playing for some years before getting coaching and therefore have bad habits and bad technique that is 'grooved in' rather than the good technique.

    I presume you have the same issues Kbase. All I can say is keep grooving the techniques in with your coach, do as much practice as you can as well. I think someone said you need to practice something about 10,000 times properly before it becomes a habit or grooved in so keep at it. The more you do it with your coach the more likely it is to come out in your games.

    It might be helpful to play some easier competitive games that you can try stuff out in but only concentrate on one or maybe two things otherwise brain overload gets involved ;) . If you are playing tough games and are struggling you will not get the opportunity to try anything out as you will always be chasing the game and instinctively you will revert to your bad habits. There is no easy fix just hard work and focus on what you want to achieve.
     
  6. latecomer

    latecomer Regular Member

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    What did your coach say?
     
  7. kbase

    kbase Regular Member

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    Thanks very much and you mean exactly what I try to address. Your valuable suggestions will travel a lot in my mind and to the game.

    @ latecomer - Coach asks to practice a lot as old habits haunt me subconsciously.
     
  8. Nova89

    Nova89 Regular Member

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    I completely understand what you're struggling with. I've had people -club players- ask me about proper form or swing and I would show them. They would apply it in warm ups but when game starts they go back to their wrong habits of swinging and moving their body. That's because they been into it for a long time and when theyre under the pressure of a match they would fall back to the old incorrect habits. Badminton is a fast paced game so there's no time to slow down, take a breath and think about what coach taught me. I understand that.._ but what you need to do is try harder to focus and practice a lot. It's gonna take time and effort. Have your coach yell at you if you doing it wrong. That's what I do and sometimes it work for a short while lol
     
  9. Exert

    Exert Regular Member

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    Play half court singles and continue to apply technique into it. This worked for me when transitioning from pan handle to proper grip.
     
  10. J_Noodles

    J_Noodles Regular Member

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    a lot of practice on court, depending on what u are trying to learn, u can also try to practice it outside of court (i.e backhand/forehand defense on the wall, shadow footwork)
     
  11. Dimo

    Dimo Regular Member

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    It is easier to continue with existing stroke play rather than adopt new techniques during competitive play. You might want to focus on one particular new technique you've learned and apply this in your games. Once it's grooved you can move on to the next. It's better initially to play friendlies to perfect new stroke play and movement.
     
  12. alien9113

    alien9113 Regular Member

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    Ask your coach to play against you. He will have better control so you are able to hit the shuttle with the right techniques.

    Over time, this will stay with you instead of you reverting back to your incorrect techniques.

    Either that, you find someone who's of equal or lower level than you to play against. This is so that you are able to move fast enough to behind the shuttle and focus on hitting correctly.
     
  13. pcll99

    pcll99 Regular Member

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    http://home.earthlink.net/~tfakehany/bad.html

    Bad Habits

    By: Stephanie Benjamin

    So you have a bad habit! Welcome to the world of reality. You are tired of hearing your coach drone on and on yelling, “don’t drop your elbow”, or whatever it is. At every practice, you think to yourself, can’t he come up with something better than that. Well, you need to take control. Force your coach to come up with something else. There is only one way to do that. I guarantee, when you succeed, it will make you feel great.

    Everyone who plays a sport, picks up bad habits at some time. Than they practice the bad habit over and over and get really good at it. Normally some coach picks up on it and tries to change the habit. This is frustrating for you because you can get the job done your way. But, the bottom line is, if you want to move up to the next level, you must use correct fundamentals. If your coach wants you to change, you are lucky. You have a coach who cares about you; who wants you to be the best you can be.

    Breaking bad habits is much more difficult than learning new skills. It takes 21 days to break a bad habit. This is because of muscle memory. Your muscles and nerves automatically do what you have practiced over and over. You do not have to think about brushing your teeth, walking, or tying your shoes. It is automatic. But, to learn a new way to do these things, you must concentrate. It is the same way with bad habits in volleyball. You automatically perform the skill incorrectly because of muscle memory. Now you must change that, which means you must concentrate on the NEW habit. You will normally get worse before you get better. You can not worry about results. Most often, results will be poor. You must concentrate on forming new habits, new muscle memory, so the correct way becomes automatic. Bad habits are no ones fault, but changing them is your responsibility.

    It is important for you to understand, just working on your bad habit at practice is not enough. If you really want to change and become a better player, it is your responsibility to work on change. That means repetition at home, correctly working on the new skill without the added pressure of needing results at a practice or a game. Do it correctly 100 times a night in different forms: without a ball, in parts, in slow motion, and at game speed. Visualize the skill over and over. Find a role model to watch who does the skill correctly. Visualize the correct way in slow motion and at game speed. See it on the inside of your eyelids, your blank screen. Physically do it in slow motion and game speed without a ball. Add a ball if you can. There is not enough time at practice to meet your personal needs fully. It is your responsibility to change. If you work on it at home and in practice, you will get results. This will decrease your frustration at practice.
    It is your habit. You are responsible for changing it. If you do not change, someone else may start before you. You must work on your own time to get better, Do not get frustrated. it takes a lot of time. Just do it. It will probably take a month. But you will be rewarded 10 times over for your time and effort. Once you have mastered your new habit, continue to work on it so you do not slip back into poor fundamentals. Be patient. Make sure you really understand exactly what your coach wants you to do. Ask your coach what you should do at home to practice correctly. They can give you the homework you will need. If you are going to spend the extra time to get better, be sure you are doing exactly the correct form.

    Right now, pick your weakness and work on it. If you have more than one, work on one at a time. You must spend 5 days a week for 15 to 20 minutes a day. You can not waltz into practice and expect hard work alone to get it done. You must cognitively concentrate on the change. If you only work at practice you will become very frustrated. Remember, you can out work anyone.
     
  14. Cheung

    Cheung Moderator

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    Good article and I have used some of those techniques before.

    However, some stepping stone is needed from practicing strokes to playing rallies.

    An excellent routine is playing a rally to one forehand corner. The feeder initially plays to any of three designated corners. You just have to keep the rally going and going.

    Certain patterns will start to emerge and you will notice in certain situations, unforced errors from poor technique occur. Analyse those mistakes. Why do they occur then and not at other times in normal practice.

    The half court practice is an excellent idea. You can even make the court smaller so that the idea is to concentrate on body position and skills (and not the running).
     
  15. pcll99

    pcll99 Regular Member

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    Learn the basics well. Every skill is interrelated.

    http://www.bwfbadminton.org/page.aspx?id=19996

    Search "badminton slow motion" "lee chong wei slow motion" "lin dan slow motion" "peter gade slow motion" and "taufik slow motion" at Youtube.
     
    #15 pcll99, Jun 24, 2014
    Last edited: Jun 24, 2014
  16. kbase

    kbase Regular Member

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    Thanks all for the replies

    @pcl99 - Thanks for the videos. Already watched a few of Lindan and LCW.

    I am going to follow those two valuable suggestions from today and let me pick on the one and concenterate and then move on to the next. Thanks a lot


    @Cheung

    Yeah, I do lot of half court practice. I don't have any problems during practice as I mostly do well in practice and conscious enough to correct my mistakes and execute it properly.
     
  17. Cheung

    Cheung Moderator

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    Either your half court practice is not tough enough or you're game tactics are not clear enough.
     
  18. gundamzaku

    gundamzaku Regular Member

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    one word: practice. as you continue to practice those techniques over and over again, soon your body will execute those things you've learned without you "thinking" about it. just like footwork, it's not normal to some people, like me, but with much practice, you will "automatically" execute what you learn without you forcing yourself to think about it, which will allow you more brain power to focus on games and strategies and stuff :)
     
  19. Exert

    Exert Regular Member

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    Muscle memory
     
    #19 Exert, Jun 25, 2014
    Last edited: Jun 25, 2014

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