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Over-the-shoulder crosscourt drop technique

Discussion in 'Techniques / Training' started by riuryK, Dec 20, 2011.

  1. JustinG

    JustinG Regular Member

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    I hit that shot when I'm out of position or want to use deception. I usually slice the birdie when I perform it.
     
  2. Tactim

    Tactim Regular Member

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    In most cases I still agree with urameatball, but the defensive clear is usually the better option when it's deep in your forehand corner. It's a much safer shot, easier to pull off, and less risky than the cross court drop when the shuttle is behind you and at head or shoulder level. The cross court drop from the position the OP described can be successful, but even then it is shown that it leaves a huge gap at the net even for the fastest players in the game. For the small chance that your shot does go in and is a quality shot, it's not a shot you'd like to rely on regularly because of the dangers posed.

    You can practice it, but unless you know you can get the shot perfect every time(which even Chen Long doesn't), it's much more reliable to do a defensive clear to give yourself a chance to get back into the rally instead of betting it on one shot.
     
  3. chris-ccc

    chris-ccc Regular Member

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    Peter Gade did it 3 times in a row to get Lin Dan wrong-footed

    .
    But when one can get the shot perfect, the opponent can be surprised.

    In jajvirta's post (Post #15);

    Peter Gade did it 3 times in a row;
    * the first one from his forehand cross-court,
    * the second from his fore-hand straight, and
    * the third from his back-hand to cross-court (the winner).

    Even Lin Dan, who is fast with his footwork, got wrong-footed; Because he was expecting Peter Gade to do a defensive clear.
    .
     
  4. urameatball

    urameatball Regular Member

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    I couldn't have phrased it better.
    Indeed, the opponent will be surprised when you pull off the perfect shot in that situation :D
     
  5. MSeeley

    MSeeley Regular Member

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    I wonder whether the original poster is actually interested in the shot played as low as the video they psoted, or whether they would be interested to know how it is hit from a little higher when it could be a little "safer" - still not great, but not so desperate.

    I think the examples from lee chong wei and peter gade are excellent examples of the same shot, used from a less "buggered" position within the rally. Attempting the shot is not, in my opinion, stupid. Attempting it from a deep lunge position on court? Probably not great... however, you have already lost the rally I would have thought.

    I think Saina Newhal uses this shot from quite low down fairly often if I recall correctly. Although I am not convinced it is a sensible choice, it is definitely something worth being able to do. If your opponent believes and knows you can only hit straight, you are equally stuffed as attempting this risky shot anyway. If you are going to play bad rallies and get into losing positions, you might as well show off your "skills" :)

    If I were going to attempt to play this shot, from head heigh or lower, I would either hit it with a sharp tapping motion, or with a vicious slice. But that is because if I hit a straight defensive drop, I either tap or slice.

    EDIT: I would use a regular forehand overhead grip most probably, but turning towards a thumb grip may seem comfortable to some people.
     
  6. MSeeley

    MSeeley Regular Member

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    I will also mention that Peter Rasmussen (in his badminton life coaching cds) teaches this shot as the "Defensive Forehand Slice" (both straight and cross court) and provides excellent technical guidance on the point.
     
  7. Mr Norak

    Mr Norak Regular Member

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    From the position in the video in the OP I would either do a high clear or try to drive it to the back line on my opponent's court. It might work to trick them doing that shoulder cross court drop but if they're already close to the net then it'd be an easy block. :eek:
     
  8. riuryK

    riuryK Regular Member

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    Hi,

    I was interested in the low-height shot. The other one is not so difficult to perform IMHO since it's quite similar to a regular overhead, thus applying slice is more like a fast drop shot, but not as high.

    However the defensive low one is way more difficult to me.

    Thanks.
     
  9. MSeeley

    MSeeley Regular Member

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    Thanks for clarifying! In that case, I would play the shot with a touch of slice, using a sharp tapping movement - the shot should be crisp and fast, never slow.

    How often do you find you need to (or want to) play this shot in a game? Once in a match? Once a game? Or never - you just want to be able to play the shot?

    Good luck!
     
  10. riuryK

    riuryK Regular Member

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    Thanks a lot for your tips! I just want to have it in my arsenal. I end up in that position in the corner several times in a game, and from there I use the play the much safer so-called in Rasmussen's DVD "Defensive forehand clear". It's a safer shot, you send it high and deep to the backhand corner, a let's start over.

    However I want to include also this crosscourt stroke, so I'm not so predictable, since my rival would end up knowing I will always play that defensive forehand clear once and again.

    Thanks. Take care.
     
  11. MSeeley

    MSeeley Regular Member

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    Sounds sensible to me. Consider doing some more rasmussen style footwork drills however - I don't think you should need to play this shot quite so often. Players usually struggle to move deep into their forehand corner (and recover from their especially). Perhaps you won't need to play the shot so much if you can intercept the shuttle using the jump out/china jump footwork instead?

    Happy new year to everyone!
     

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