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playing in front, how to do quick attacks?

Discussion in 'Techniques / Training' started by giant_q_tip, Dec 7, 2010.

  1. giant_q_tip

    giant_q_tip Regular Member

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    so, i hold the racket pretty lightly before my strokes but when it comes to playing in the front and attacking the opponent with drives, steep shots etc, i just dont have the power to do it.

    i read somewhere that you need to snap your wrist; but then again i know that its not just the wrist thats acting because its too weak.

    so im assuming its all in the forearm rotation that provides the power? but how do you improve the speed of the forearm rotation that results in a wrist snap?

    i hope im making sense. but basically im having troubles intercepting shots and hitting shots at a steep angle in the front. i know my posture is probably wrong haha but there are people who just can attack fluidly in the front and hit everything down regardless of how fast the ball is coming back towards them.

    so any advice?

    thanks guys! :)
     
  2. giant_q_tip

    giant_q_tip Regular Member

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    sorry for the double post (i cant find the edit button) but also how do i get a steeper angle on my shots? i hold the racket pretty lightly with loose fingers and gaps between the fingers and my shots go downwards, but it lacks that "oomph" to make it hit the ground.

    and how is power transferred throughout the body?

    from the legs, trunk then arm?

    edit: oh i guess editing is closed after a time limit is reached..
     
    #2 giant_q_tip, Dec 7, 2010
    Last edited: Dec 7, 2010
  3. raymond

    raymond Regular Member

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    Don't stand too close to the net, unless you/your-partner played a net/drop. Standing too close, and all shots will appear too fast. Reduce back swing - power is less important than racket speed when you're in front.
     
  4. nprince

    nprince Regular Member

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    Playing front is more about quick response and timing. You should not worry too much about power.

    Not always, you can play powerful smashes from front-but at the same time, a simple tap down could be a winning shot. You may want to read the article from Gollum- badmintonbible.com "net kills".

    Some simple tips to help you,

    Always keep the racket up and try to intercept the shots only till it passes you. Do not try to retrive something that has gone past you-leave it to your partner.

    For net kills, a simple tap is often a winning shot-Always attempt the kill, unless too tight to execute.For tight kills, bring the racket in to position and use grip tightening. Try finger power technic & brush technic. I remember seeing a very good video from lee Jae Bok on this.

    For intercepting smash returns, stand further back-almost 1 meter behind "T". keep the racket up-move forward to meet the shuttle whenever possible. Use fore hand action as much as possible (Around the head)

    Best of luck
    NP
     
  5. MSeeley

    MSeeley Regular Member

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    Some things to consider, already mentioned by others - you must not stand too far forwards. Doing so, is VERY likely to result in you being late onto the shuttle and not taking it IN FRONT of you. Without this, you cannot hit steep or powerful shots.

    The "crispness" from front court shots is, in my opinion, all about the effective use of FINGER power. The relaxing and then last minute tightening of the grip. The smaller and more "compact" the hitting action, the more focussed your power will be. More power comes from a rebound hitting action (or a TAPPING action) where the racket head stops and comes back again after hitting the shuttle, following through is not very effective.

    Be careful when having your racket "up" - if it is too high, then you are susceptible to lower faster shots (like drives) from your opponents, ideally, you don't want your racket to be ABOVE the net. Note, this is when waiting for the next shot. As soon as you see the next shot coming, do whatever it takes to take the shuttle early. However, if you have your racket very high above the net, and your opponent hits a fast low drive at you, then you are likely to have to hit the shuttle downwards, into the net.

    Build up a good rhythm with your feet, so that they are constantly moving, if not necessarily travelling around the court. Keep a nice wide low base, with your feet mostly apart.

    The final thing, also mentioned by others, is that in the front court, SPEED is threatening, not power. You don't need to hit the first intercept onto the floor, but after you have got the first one, you should be able to finish off the rally within the next 2 or 3 shots - place your attack so that they are constantly having to cope with varying angles of attack, and then play a net kill at the earliest opportunity.

    The best front court player in the world, in my opinion, is lars paaske. Look up some of his matches :)

    Hope this helps

    Matt
     
  6. giant_q_tip

    giant_q_tip Regular Member

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    hey guys thanks for the input! now you guys said that i shouldnt stand too far in front. i usually stand right at the T and move left and right, following my partner in the back. like we move in straight motion. am i covering him correctly? i do have my body tilted towards the empty side, so incase the opponent plays a cross court defence, i would also be ready to intercept it as well.

    also Matt! :D you mentioned tapping, where the racket head stops and comes back again. how do i improve the recovery time of my tapping action? when i tap, it feels weird and stiff, even if i have my fingers very loose before i hit the shuttle. i guess my tapping lacks recoil? is that what its called? when the racket comes back after you hit the shuttle. because it only covers very short distance when the racket comes back after the tapping action. i always lack power with my taps, perhaps its also because im not doing the forearm rotation correctly?
     
  7. frostbite0deg

    frostbite0deg Regular Member

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    While standing frontline always position yourself in the "comfortable zone" to return any shots. Tips: Move left-right, up-down if necessary.Try to stand your racket leg forward with racket up always, this way will help to executed the shot faster & stronger.
     
  8. visor

    visor Regular Member

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    as already mentioned by others, you don't need power in your tapping action, nor do you have the time to swing to generate power since the bird is getting to you earlier than if you stood further back

    the tapping should be as short, as compact, as fast, and as focused as possible

    if you look at Lee Jae Bok's videos, he has one of the best example of this ... his racket head practically only moves 2-3 inches!
     
  9. nprince

    nprince Regular Member

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    To answer your first question on where to stand, you need to strike a balance where in you will be able to make effective attacking shots without compromising too much on your defense. Lee Jae Bok explains this very well in his training videos.

    If your partner is forced to move to extreme back to smash, you need to re position yourself so as to cover majority of the court. You move further back-1-1.5 meters behind "T". From here, you will be able to move front and Kill any weak replies. Do not worry if opponents manage to make a decent reply which you will not be able to kill immediately, still you will be in a good position to intercept them and tap it in a downward angle. From here, you are able to make a good downward hit, you can start moving forward-to the direction where you send the shuttle and attempt kills on any weak replies. 2-5 consecutive attacking shots will normally win the rally for you.

    To your second question, about tapping-When you are playing front, you will not get enough time to prepare and smash as you would normally do in a back court smash. Here the second best option is, be crisp, deprive the opponents of time, cramp them for space and obtain a weak reply. Hence, you bring the racket in to position early, and use kind of a jerk to get the power. Practice is the only way to get this right. Timing is very important here-your racket head may move only a few inches and your point of contact and timing has to be precise which only comes with practice.

    Please do bear in mind-when you are playing front, you may not be making contact with the shuttle as often as you like to have. Still you need consider yourself successful with your task-you have prevented your opponents from making any attacking reply, forced them to lift which your partner can attack. Doubles is all about making your partner look good.

    NP
     
  10. daniel.kong

    daniel.kong Regular Member

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    in my opinion, playing frontal required minimal action. a simple tap can be playable. keeping racket up and always in front of you is vital as shuttle speed is fast so that you are able to response in time.
     
  11. MSeeley

    MSeeley Regular Member

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    Tapping will feel weird if you are not used to it. The rebound or recoil as you correctly called it, is very small, but becomes bigger once you relax your fingers and arm once more. So you relax, tighten on impact, start to recoil, then continue to recoil by relaxing and returning to a good ready position. You should not feel you have to use forearm rotation. For most intercepts with the shuttle in front, you will probably use a form of "net kill" hitting action, rather than a "drive" or "smash" hitting action, where less forearm rotation is used. If you lack power, in my opinion, work on your finger power and timing your tapping action, not your forearm rotation (finger power can be improved by doing some heavy racket/weighted racket training e.g. practise playing the front court using a squash racket).

    With regard to standing "on the T", in my opinion standing this far forwards is virtually never beneficial when trying to cover the front court. What is most often misunderstood, is that when your partner plays the rearcourt, your job is to cover the MIDcourt AND the Forecourt, which can only be done by standing further back. I would recommend the advice given regarding lee jae boks training. You should nearly always be at least 1m back from the service line, moving as you stated on the same side of the court as your partner. As you hit your shots, you may start moving forwards. This is fine, but if a short lift comes remember, it is NEVER yours unless it is going to land in front of you, if you have to move backwards to hit the shot, it is your partners shot, not yours (unless you are covering that cross court defence i.e. helping each other out).

    Check out this video, and learn all the secrets :)
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bWkkM36Y_90
     

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