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Potential of flexible racquets

Discussion in 'Badminton Rackets / Equipment' started by XKazeCloudX, Jun 27, 2007.

  1. XKazeCloudX

    XKazeCloudX Regular Member

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    Hi, I have read the sticky about how flexible vs stiff racquets work. But I would like to know if the potential of a flexible racquet be the same as a stiff racquet. In otherwords, would the optimum speed output of a flexible racquet be as fast as a stiff racquet.

    My own guess would be no. But would the stiff racquet have a HUGE amount of more potential speed? Thanks :)
     
  2. __Lam

    __Lam Regular Member

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    depends how stiff. the stiffer the racquet + more it is flexed = most power & control
     
  3. chickenpoodle

    chickenpoodle Regular Member

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    the more flexible racquet will never hold the same potential that the stiffer racquet can hold.

    the flexible racquet merely eases the power requirements to generate the same amount of output that a stiffer racquet might generate.

    ultimately, with the same power applied, the more flexible racquet will generate more output than the stiffer racquet will, TO A POINT.

    once this point has been reached, the flexible racquet will then exhibit symptoms of being overflexed, and this is where the stiffer racquet will keep on generating power.

    the issue with racquet stiffness is the same as that of string tension...
     
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  4. DinkAlot

    DinkAlot dcbadminton
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    In addition, once you overflex the flexible racket, it will start to degrade and eventually, the shaft will, unfortunately, snap. Not a good thing. :p
     
  5. morewood

    morewood Regular Member

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    Whilst the stiff racquet has the most potenital power a flexible racquet with the right stringing will in 'most' circumstances deliver as much power as is needed.
     
  6. XKazeCloudX

    XKazeCloudX Regular Member

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    ooh ohkay. but I am worried that I swing too fast with my medium flex racquet, im not sure if i have reached the POINT where swinging any faster reduces speed instead of increase, is playing with a "stiff" racquet and effectively using it a very advance stage of a badminton player?

    i myself feel that i am swining pretty fast, not to brag but i do consider myself athletic. just to help my question being answered.
     
    #6 XKazeCloudX, Jun 28, 2007
    Last edited: Jun 28, 2007
  7. DinkAlot

    DinkAlot dcbadminton
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    In many to most cases, if you are asking this question, you have probably "outgrown" your current racket. :p

    The best way is to determine this is to test a stiffer racket of the same characteristics or as close as possible (string tension, etc...) and see if you get more power, consistently. Assuming you feel comfortable with it and it doesn't hurt your amr, move to the stiffer racket.

    If you can't find a near identical racket, but find something similar and you get more power, you need to make sure, it's not the other elements of the racket making you more power; for instance, added weight, more endloaded/balance point, more aerodynamic head, etc...

    Finally, maximizing speed is not always the goal. Maximizing swing speed consistently is. This is the reason I don't use the NS9000-X; though I love the performance and the stiff shaft, I overswing and am not consistent with the racket. This mostly due to the very aerodynamic frame and balance, I overswing. If I did not overswing, the 9000-X would probably be my go to racket as it hits absolute bombs for a 3U (US code) racket.
     
  8. XKazeCloudX

    XKazeCloudX Regular Member

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    alright. Thanks dinkalot ur the best.

    i guess i do like how the flexible racquets are more forgiving and easier to use when your tired, because you wont swing as fast.
     
  9. morewood

    morewood Regular Member

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    One of the major key factors to not having a super stiff racquet as far as I am concerned.
     
  10. stumblingfeet

    stumblingfeet Regular Member

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    I can think of racquet flexing occuring due to 2 causes: from the swing, then from the impact.

    When you swing, the head of the racquet will "lag" behind the top of the handle in terms of angular position relative to the racquet's handle. The amount of deformation (ie "flex") is dependent on the racquet's stiffness. The product of deformation and stiffness gives the elastic deformation energy stored momentarily in the racquet. With a stiff racquet, you store this energy quickly and then get it back just as quickly. With a more flexible racquet, you store the energy more slowly and it comes back out more slowly.

    A consequence here would be that with a flexible racquet, there is more of a need to allow the racquet to spring back into shape, thus transferring the elastic potential energy into racquet head velocity. So, that's why with a flexible racquet a whipping action in the stroke just before contact is useful for maximizing power. You go from accelerating the racquet head directly (and flexing the head back at the same time) to accelerating the racquet head by releasing that stored energy.

    Another portion of the stroke where stiffness comes into play is the impact with the shuttle. For the same impact speed, a flexible racquet bends more, so the precision of the stroke is reduced. However, there is something that has to be considered. The impact force travels down through the racquet to the grip - at that point you need to be able to "match" the force time curve with your hands. If you don't, you end up with a major loss of power and an excessive stress on your hands and forearms, which is not good. With a stiff racquet, the force time curve rises much more steeply, so you need that much better ability in being able to react to that force.
     
  11. XKazeCloudX

    XKazeCloudX Regular Member

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    well if you put it that way...a stiff racquet sounds very hard to use =X
     
  12. DinkAlot

    DinkAlot dcbadminton
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    Depends on the wielder. :p
     

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