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pressure down tool in string machine

Discussion in 'Badminton Stringing Techniques & Tools' started by youngwind, Apr 7, 2008.

  1. youngwind

    youngwind Regular Member

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  2. Pete LSD

    Pete LSD Regular Member

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    Yes YW, those are load spreaders. Where were these photos taken? Was this a sports equipment exhibition (trade show)?
     
    #2 Pete LSD, Apr 7, 2008
    Last edited: Apr 7, 2008
  3. Pete LSD

    Pete LSD Regular Member

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    That is a first generation Shuttle Express stringing machine, first pioneered by Alpha. The second generation has head and throat press down devices.
     
  4. Mark A

    Mark A Regular Member

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    I have got to get me some of those - I have been a victim of high noon disease in the past:(. Anybody know where I can get some?

    M.
     
  5. Geoffrey

    Geoffrey Regular Member

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    I know that they are available on shuttle-house but cost around each piece costs around some USD40 which is simply ridiculous for such a small piece of plastic. I'd also like to know if anywhere is selling them cheaper.
     
  6. chicha

    chicha Regular Member

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  7. coachgary

    coachgary Regular Member

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  8. Mark A

    Mark A Regular Member

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  9. ae86trueno

    ae86trueno Regular Member

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    yeah agreed, hopefully load spreader will be available :D :D +1 for the hint ;)
     
  10. taneepak

    taneepak Regular Member

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    Frankly, I think load spreaders are misapplied band aid. I never use one and I have had no problem with high noon disease or frame distortion.
     
  11. chicha

    chicha Regular Member

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    Mind explaining it....?
     
  12. jerby

    jerby Regular Member

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    what are the yellow ones used for?

    on loadspreaders, I think they're useful. Sure, if you make sure the posts are not tightened, and adjust the cross-tension enough that the original shape is retained...Then why use a loadspreader?

    But using a loadpsreader works, and comforts people...Because of that loadspreader it's ok for me to tighten the posts (ever so slightly), I like em.

    To call it "missaplied bandaid" is to say you don't need it... But others might, even they might not need it, but it does help, there's no going around that...
     
  13. DinkAlot

    DinkAlot dcbadminton
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    I had load spreaders and am not sure if they worked or not. In any event, I've never had a problem with HND (High Noon Disease) either and got rid of the load spreaders.

    I wonder who came up with the name HND? It's not a disease, it's more like SF (Stringer Failure). :p
     
  14. DinkAlot

    DinkAlot dcbadminton
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    Well, I've never needed load spreaders (LS) and all the pro stringers I know and talk to locally do not use them.

    I'm not saying LSs do not work (I don't know if they do or do not), I'm just saying if I've never had problems with HND, why bother with the extra hassle?
     
  15. gsloh

    gsloh Regular Member

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    Jerry,

    How did you make yours out of that hobby stuff? Mind posting some pictures?;):D
     
  16. taneepak

    taneepak Regular Member

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    So called load spreaders are solely used on suspension system. Suspension system machines should not have any load placed on the n/s posts, as all load and support are taken by the 4 side supports. Using load spreaders only put uncalled for stress on the top part of the frame. Load spreaders also have a hard plastic surface, which are acceptable as side supports but damaging on the top of the frame, because a frame has a natural elasticity from side to side but not from top to throat.
     
  17. DinkAlot

    DinkAlot dcbadminton
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    This makes sense 100%. :)
     
  18. chicha

    chicha Regular Member

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    Does it mean if no load spreader is used, there will be no stress at all on the top part of the frame especially when the mains are being pull? There must be some sort of stress or force at 12 and 6 o'clock position when the yellow plastic frame retainers at the head and throat touches inside of the racket frame right?
     
    #18 chicha, Apr 9, 2008
    Last edited: Apr 9, 2008
  19. jerby

    jerby Regular Member

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    For my sotx's, it hardly matters...
    when stringing some(one else's) yonex rackets I just get paranoid. I've had it happen on maybe one or two occassions (one of which was the most recent, a slight dent at 26lbs)

    To me it's just safety...(or, to be intellectually honest, an obsessive compulsion:p:eek:)

    true, they should not, but slightly tightening can happen, whether you want to or not. Therefore some people use LS's, just to be safe...

    what the.... No, they don't... putting something in between the post and the racket (with a larger contact surface!) reduces stress (hence the name) Using LS's is no excuse to tighten the Head/throat supports like a nutcase...

    I don't know what to say....
     
  20. taneepak

    taneepak Regular Member

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    Without load spreaders, a suspension system is solely dependent on the 4 side supports, which must be mounted properly. The two posts at the top and throat do not contribute to any support. However, the top part of the frame, being slimmer than the throat end with its T joint, will move inwards slightly when you string and tension the mains. This slight movement should be absorbed by the hard rubber side of the post, not the metal side, as the rubber side is more elastic and is also energy-absorbing. At very high mains tension you can sometimes see the rubber post "giving way" but that is perfectly safe. However, when you mount the racquet you must not stretch the frame with the two posts, as doing so will leave no room for the rubber to absorb any more energy when tensioning the mains, resulting in high noon disease. The rubber must be "relaxed" not "tensioned" from over-stretching.
     

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