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Proper methods for stringing Yonex

Discussion in 'Badminton Stringing Techniques & Tools' started by mail43249, Feb 22, 2011.

  1. mail43249

    mail43249 Regular Member

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  2. Blitzzards

    Blitzzards Regular Member

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    Simply put, we are. The main reason why Yonex and the other brands specify string patterns for the racquets are such that the strings are not put on improperly, which when done without care may most likely cause the racquet frames to be subjected to unnecessary stresses (such as putting one too many string passes through a single pass grommet, not doing the mains from the centre out or not threading the outer main strings in the pattern as specified by Yonex). The stresses will eventually lead to the racquet frame warping and distorting after sustaining enough shuttle impacts and breaking apart, even at relatively low tensions of 24lbs.

    It is very similar to you purchasing a car which the manufacturer specifies as "Diesel fuel powered" and the petrol station attendant pumping in "Regular" without bothering (and then telling you that they know what they're doing, because they have experience in the business and you're not) ;)

    I talked with an honest stringer recently and learned from him that the main reason why most stringers are such ignorants originates from the old times when even the professional players are using much lower tensions than now.

    Back in the 1980's when racquets are still produced with aluminium frames people don't use tensions exceeding 20lbs. This meant that stringers can string racquets by doing the mains from one side to the other and also not following specific threading patterns since the racquet frame is a lot more sturdy and even slightly elastic (can bend and reform its shape; the steel racquet will always win in a clash against the graphite racquet). It was after the introduction of the all graphite racquet that the stringing had to be more specific as graphite is more brittle despite being a lot lighter (the latter being the selling point till today). However it was not until the late 80's or so that the graphite racquets began to sell and by then the older generation of simpler stringing machines were still being used everywhere. A lot of these stringers who learnt how to string racquets during these times are still accustomed to the older method of stringing.

    Currently, the older generation of stringing machines are still available but mostly only recommended for the steel racquets. They are also relatively cheap to procure since they don't have a lot of features [which are in fact necessary for adequately supporting graphite racquets during the stringing process]. But since the stringers are accustomed to such machines, they would just use the older method to do the current graphite racquets while not bothering to think about the proper string pattern and method. They also teach their protégés their method and it gets passed on indefinitely. The benefit they do get is that the "incorrect" method (or their own method) is fast and easy to do and this saves them a lot of time per racquet and they are able to do quite a lot per day. [My stringer showed me the older method compared to the Yonex method I requested him to do on my racquet and per one racquet he does for me he could pretty much squeeze in two others]. We being the ones who do not have much stringing experience will end up being handed the sub par string job. I have seen quite a lot of racquets which are in such bad condition from having to tolerate the improper string pattern, and yet their owners have no idea and just believe that "it is only part of the racquets' life cycle" :mad:

    I have also met and currently am avoiding stringers who tell me that the high tension fashion is only a rumour and that the professional players are really only using 28lbs tension (they do dare to name a few famous ones which they say only uses so and so tension). Pure ignorance, in conclusion :rolleyes:

    So in short, if you live in an area where people don't use relatively high tension, you can expect the local stringer to be a total ignorant. Unless he/she is willing to learn new experiences :D
     
  3. monticore

    monticore Regular Member

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    my local stringer , looked at me like i was bigfoot when i mentioned adding +2 lbs to the crosses, said his machine did the pre stretching ( had a 2 pt manual lockout) and they don't normally do cab20 more than 18lbs.

    when i went back the next day to see if it was ready my racket was in the stringer and the 16year old girl doing the job said the other guys should be able to putter around with it tomorrow and finish it. as she was serving other customers in between each cross she was tightening.so my cab 20 got a 20+ hour string job done by 2-3 different people in a 2pt support system .my string broke in the warm up( bg 65). oh forgot they also added a 23rd cross for free though.

    the only other stringing option in the area is sportscheck.


    next week i purchased my own stringer, and i don;t even play that often

    cory
     
  4. mail43249

    mail43249 Regular Member

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    Horrible horrible horrible! My $200 racket is probably under undue stress from the improper stringing job done. Yonex and other makers should impose some kind of certification program to separate the qualified stringers from the ignorant ones who do not understand the science of modern stringing.
     
  5. druss

    druss Regular Member

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    I can't ever see that happening... who would pay to organize and run it? You'd need to have classes, tests... etc.
     
  6. maa2003

    maa2003 Regular Member

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    since you are from SG, may I know who you referred to ?
    when I was in SG, I always used Yonex method and pattern after I bought my own machine.
    I've seen 3 stringers in Singapore did not followed Yonex method, the racket shape is OK. Two of them are even recommended stringers (they start the main from centre-to-side), while the other one is a big no since he still strings from side-to-side for main.
    I was living in the West area that time.
     
  7. mail43249

    mail43249 Regular Member

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    Key Question: Which Singapore stringers does it the Yonex recommended methods?
     
  8. Ouchee

    Ouchee Regular Member

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    According to Yonex method, the crosses should be strung from bottom to top, but I have seen most stringers in pro shop or in club, they usually string from top to bottom which I never argue with them because they are the "pro". However, after getting my own stringer, I simply follow Yonex method starting from the bottom. So now the question is, does it really matter you start from top or bottom?
     
  9. Alexccs

    Alexccs Regular Member

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    Certification is good, and them you have pay a premium to string your racket, like tennis US $30 per service.
     
  10. adidascanada

    adidascanada Regular Member

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  11. CovinaStringer

    CovinaStringer Regular Member

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    USRSA is mainly geared towards Tennis, and their test is based on that. I know what is required to pass the test, and it's nothing like stringing badminton rackets. The hands on part of the test only proves proficiency of stringing a tennis racquet, changing the grip, and grommets. The written part of the test is all about marketing terms, about racket materials and strings. IMHO a certified stringer should be able to prove he/she can string any type of racket.

    Though being a member of the USRSA gives you benefits like access to all string patterns of any racquet made, past and present. You don't have to be certified to be a member of the USRSA.

    That said, I think there should be a Badminton Racquet Stringing Association, so people learn the proper techniques and fundamentals of stringing badminton rackets. I know a guy in the UK that did not like the ERSA and started his own Association, UKRSA. So how hard could it be?
     
  12. adidascanada

    adidascanada Regular Member

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    Yes, it is geared more towards tennis (that is the world we live in in general in racquet sports) but there are badminton, squash and racquetball patterns in the their distributed knowledge base. The fundamentals of stringing the racquet is the same across the board. Inspecting the racquet, mounting it correctly in the stringing machine, ensuring use of the specified pattern, correct tensioning, knotting, etc. Experienced stringers take this for granted because it is part of the routine. New stringers (especially self taught) need to learn these 'habits". Besides why limit yourself to just stringing badminton racquets when you can make money from the rich tennis (and squash and racquetball) players who like $80+ string jobs?? ; )
     
  13. CovinaStringer

    CovinaStringer Regular Member

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    Coming from a Tennis background, I find that stringing for badminton is not as easy as one suspects. In some ways stringing for badminton is a throw back to the old days of Wooden rackets, with all the shared holes. Like in Tennis we try to string from the top down, or Head to Throat, whenever possible. In badminton it's the opposite in some cases. Does the USRSA cover that in it's test? NO. I'm not saying the USRSA is bad, it's their test that is flawed, and a waste of money, IMHO. They already get me for $109 a year just to be a member. Being certified is just a piece of paper you hang on your wall, you paid $150 plus supplies for. If a new stringer wants to learn the right way to string, then they should take lessons from an experienced stringer. Most of the time, a New Stringer knows the fundamentals of stringing, but they take lessons to hone their skills and find out what they are doing wrong.

    Also to sting tennis rackets requires a tennis stringing machine, not all badminton only machines can handle the higher tensions and mount the bigger tennis rackets. Would I pay someone to string my racket on a Drop Weight machine with flying clamps? The answers is, "They would have to pay me."

    BTW the going rate in So Cal for labor is $10 plus cost of string, it does not matter what kind of racket (tennis, badminton, squash and racquetball). No one is going to be rich stringing rackets, but it's a great hobby that pays for itself.
     
  14. adidascanada

    adidascanada Regular Member

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    Again, I agree with the tennis bias at the USRSA but tennis is the dominant racquet sport. Squash and Racquetball specific stringing methods and practices are also not covered in the testing. As a member you have the ability to help change this bias. But I feel this is a good avenue to explore for those who do not know a stringer (or a stringer willing to teach them) and want to learn more.
    Its unfortunate that you pay for a membership to an organization you don't fully believe in and endorse.

    I wasn't saying get rich (you are absolutely right, no one gets rich stringing) but if you have the ability to string more than badminton you open yourself up to more clients if you want them.
     
  15. maa2003

    maa2003 Regular Member

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    agree with you .... but with the stringing rackets you can get another networks, friends, and respect from the competitors ....
    one of my friend asked me why I bought many stringing machines, then I told him this as part of my hobby ....
     
  16. CovinaStringer

    CovinaStringer Regular Member

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    I string for some of the guys from other teams in my league. Since my initial investment in a machine, I've been able to pay my USTA membership, League Fees, String, Club dues, buy better machines and tools. My two current machines are a Babolat Sensor and a Gamma 6004 with a Wise 2086 Pro, both paid for by stringing.
     
  17. monticore

    monticore Regular Member

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    i just don't understand in this day in age with how easy and accessible information is why people don't use it. so when you see a bad stringer i am not upset at his lack of skills ,i am more upset at his lack of caring about other people's equipment to improve their skills.

    in less than 2 months i have gone from not knowing the name of any badminton/tennis string to owning and stringing my own racket using multiple styles ATW/single/2 piece etc..

    i definetly didn't get into stringing to make money, i don;t want another JOB, but any hobby that can somewhat pay for itself is a bonus,

    cory
     
  18. Blitzzards

    Blitzzards Regular Member

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    Sadly speaking, most people who strictly see stringing badminton racquets as their job and a form of revenue have no care of the proper way of doing things as they will only do things as they see fit themselves. As I have mentioned these "stringers" (who have no care or interest in learning other methods than their own) will always try to maximise their own benefits and the lack of care of using the correct techniques will only allow them to maximise their time saved per racquet string job.

    Time is money, and these "stringers" are mean, money-pinching unethical business people.
     
  19. kwun

    kwun Administrator

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    this is what i was told regarding Yonex Certification in the US.

    Alan Kakinami, one of the official Yonex stringers who strings for many of the Yonex badminton and tennis events are in charge of certifying Yonex stringers. however, at the moment, the certification program is still being worked on and nobody (despite what they tell you), probably except Alan, can be called a Yonex certified stringer.

    once Alan has the program in place, then maybe we will see more Yonex Certified Stringers.
     
  20. monticore

    monticore Regular Member

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    one day they will just wonder where all the clients went.
    cory
     

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