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Pulled a muscle while doing some dynamic stretching

Discussion in 'Injuries' started by Kevindoui, Jan 23, 2007.

  1. Kevindoui

    Kevindoui Regular Member

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    During one of my practices I pulled both my groin and hip flexor (the one you use to lift your legs). I ran for about 10 mins beofre doing so, so my body was fully warm. I was wondering if this has happened to anyone else, if so what did you do. I'm guessing it was poor technic, but my coach was watching me do it, so I dont really know.
     
  2. __Lam

    __Lam Regular Member

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    ouch haha both at once. most you can do is eat healthy and wait for time to heal it.
     
  3. westwood_13

    westwood_13 Regular Member

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    That's really unfortunate... probably a freak accident, or perhaps you're really quite uber intense about your dynamic stretching.

    How bad of a pull is it? If it's not too bad, ice, a decent amount of rest, and avoiding specific drills/situations that aggravate it is my standard advice.
     
  4. Kevindoui

    Kevindoui Regular Member

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    How bad of a pull is it? If it's not too bad, ice, a decent amount of rest, and avoiding specific drills/situations that aggravate it is my standard advice.[/quote]

    Well it hurt til the point where I couldnt do any leg raises and I was limping on both legs if that makes sense. This happened about a week and half ago, I can still feel it a little bit, but its getting better now (I hope:s)
     
  5. henmd111

    henmd111 Regular Member

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    dynamic stretching is never recommended, Passive stretching is the way to go. I f you do dynamic stretching you ar much more prone to injuries. Try resting your legs for 2 weeks then re-asses your injury.:)
     
  6. westwood_13

    westwood_13 Regular Member

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    Well it hurt til the point where I couldnt do any leg raises and I was limping on both legs if that makes sense. This happened about a week and half ago, I can still feel it a little bit, but its getting better now (I hope:s)[/quote]

    That's good... I'd still suggest taking it easy for the next week, at least, to minimize the risk of re-injury.
     
  7. DarrenHart

    DarrenHart Regular Member

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    Passive stretching should be used after exersise as part of a cool down routine, dynamics are better pre-exersise. Research has suggested that static stretching pre-exercise can decrease muscular power output by up to 20 % !
     
  8. henmd111

    henmd111 Regular Member

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    Passive stretching is good after exercise but it is also benficial during pre-game as long as you had proper warm up (around 10min), Could you state the source of your research, because I dont know of any medical or sports medicine book that suggests to use dynamic stretching as it has caused alot of injuries.
     
  9. Cheung

    Cheung Moderator

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    For your reference,

    Is stretching of benefit in exercise?

    and a relevant follow up..

    Static stretching -- a podiatrist's warning
     
  10. henmd111

    henmd111 Regular Member

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    Thanx, this just confirms what I have said, Passive/ Static stretching is the one that is recommended not Dynamic. There is no real evidence that stretching can prevent delayed onset muscle spasm or DOMS but there is medical basis that it can lessen the pain. But the concern here is dynamic stretching, dont know of any sport medicine doctor that recommends it.
     
  11. stumblingfeet

    stumblingfeet Regular Member

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    How about this: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/..._uids=15970955&query_hl=1&itool=pubmed_docsum

    Basically, passive stretching involves extending a limb, putting tension on the muscle and connective tissue. When this normally happens, the stretch reflex occurs, meaning that the muscles contracts in response to that tension. With the stretch reflex the muscles can contract much more forcefully than without it - this is the basis for plyometric training. What passive stretching does is you hold the stretch for a bit, allowing the stretch reflex to dissipate thus increasing your range of motion. In effect, you are training your body to minimize the effects of the stretch reflex, the opposite of plyometric training.

    Now, the purpose of a warm-up is to prepare yourself for competition. First of all there is the raising of the body temperature and increase in circulation. Then there is the warm-up of the CNS- you perform a progression of sport specific movements, so you can practice the motor patterns that you will be needing for sport. Now, in badminton, are extreme levels of flexibility needed? I think the importance of flexibility is a bit overrated. How about the "stiffness" that a well functioning stretch reflex brings? In this case it can increase explosive power, movement efficiency and also protect against injury by contracting the muscle reactively to distribute force transfer away from the joints.
     
  12. DarrenHart

    DarrenHart Regular Member

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  13. DarrenHart

    DarrenHart Regular Member

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  14. henmd111

    henmd111 Regular Member

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    For the first site, yes it is already a accepted fact that pre exercise static stretching is not helpfull, what you need is adequate warmup before you stretch. For the second site, this emphasizes warmup, which is what I have been saying, and the exercises mentioned are the regular dynamic warm up atheletes do. What I am not for is the dynamic or ballistic stretching, E.g. bouncing up and down to stretch your gastrocs or calf muscles.

    by the way are you a doctor?
     
  15. SystemicAnomaly

    SystemicAnomaly Regular Member

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    In defense of dynamic stretching

    OK, let's be very clear about the terminology here. Dynamic stretching is not synonymous with ballistic stretching. The latter involves bouncing the muscles, whereas dynamic stretching does not. Dynamic stretching consists of controlled leg and arm swings that take you (gently) to the limits of your range of motion. Ballistic stretches involve trying to force a part of the body beyond its range of motion.

    If either passive stretches or dynamic stretches are executed in such a manner as to exceed the natural range of motion, it becomes ballistic. For the most part, ballistic stretching is not advised.

    In the past few years, dynamic stretching as part of a pre-exercise warmup, has become the norm for professional and university athletes in most sports. Static or passive stretches are performed only as a post-exercise activity.
     

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