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question on stringing

Discussion in 'Badminton Stringing Techniques & Tools' started by benfok, Dec 1, 2002.

  1. benfok

    benfok Regular Member

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    Hi people:

    I recently bought the M140 stringing machine and stringed one of my racquet with it. After the first clear shot my string is broken. It snapped at the top the middle of the main string.

    I believe I damaged the string inadvertently. Does anybody have any tips to prevent damage of string in the process of stringing?

    Also, what is the difference between one-piece stringing and two-piece stringing?

    Ben
     
  2. LazyBuddy

    LazyBuddy Regular Member

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    What kinda string u were using? What's the tension u set? Check ur gromment whether any of them need to be replaced.

    For 1 piece (2 knots) vs 2 piece (4 knots) string methods, plz do a search. I believe ppl were talking about it within the last 1 wk or so.
     
  3. LazyBuddy

    LazyBuddy Regular Member

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  4. RSX

    RSX Regular Member

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    Check to make sure you clamps are adjusted properly, if they are too tight, you may be crimping the string, which can easily cause it to snap.

    One piece being exacltly that, you do not cut the string, and use one length to string the mains and crosses. While 2 piece, you use one lenght for the mains, then tie them off, and use a seperate length for the crosses.
     
  5. jwu

    jwu Regular Member

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    If you got the M140, make sure you adjust the weight becoz the weight tension they marked on the bar is actually set for tennis weight. You need to convert the values and they have the chart on the top right hand corner of the machine. Something like 60lbs (tennis) = 20 lbs (badminton) and every 5 lbs tennis = 2 lbs badminton.

    When you are tensioning the string, make sure you lower the drop weight bar slowly and not apply too much force on it, you can apply extra pressure on the string with your hand and that can snap the string since you can apply a lot more pressure than the string can handle. keep trying, make sure you are experimenting with cheap strings and cheap racquets first. :D
     
  6. jwu

    jwu Regular Member

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    another thing you might be doing is how tight is the string before you actually start to move the drop weight bar back? the string shouldn't be extremely tight before you start to tighten with the weight bar. once again, if you do this, you will be applying great amount of extra tension on your string and the results could be string breakage, warped racquet head, and well, your tension would be not what you desired.
     
  7. LazyBuddy

    LazyBuddy Regular Member

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    Also, make sure u r using proper tools for clamping, knots, cutting string, etc. If u using other tools, which could not only give u extra trouble for ur job, but also damage string in the process.
     
  8. badrad

    badrad Regular Member

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    1. check your clamp settng. if it is too tight, you will be crushing the shell, reducing it's durability. usually the interior is fibrous, but often there is a slight twist in the internal fibers, they can be crushed when they cross over under pressure of the clamp.

    2. on the other side of clamping is too loose, and the string exterior can be damaged by friction when it slips through the clamp.

    3. usually the mains, especially the to longest threads will have little friction burn. sometimes stringers may have a tension to rush the weaving especially at the corners. some strings that have a slight twist in the shell, you will see the string start to twist up into little loops. as well, pulling very quickly on the string, especially through an intersection will create lots of friction on the string, and potentially creating little stresses on the string shell.

    4. when you are first unravelling the string, also be careful not to kink the line. this also has some bearing on the longevity of the string.

    5. check the grommets to ensure there is no sharp surface or exposure to the racquet frame which can cut the string, or the string could dig into the frame.

    6. always check for nicks in the line before you start stringing with it. sometimes, you never know, maybe leaving it on the floor, or dragging it, it snags on something. although we always try, it is best to get an unobstructed area for your stringing machine, this way there is nothing to get in the way of your work.

    7. check for the best before date on the string. just kidding, there really isn't one, but you may want to feel the string for pliability and lubrication. Sometimes spools, or string packs that the plastic packaging has been opened, will have some drying affect on the string. although this will take a long time, (ie. a year or so sitting on the shelf) you might not necessarily know how old the stock string you purchased from. for spools, i will keep the spool in a ziplock plastic bag to prevent dryout.

    8. worst case - blame the player for mis-hitting! Hahahahah - in your case you should have a little argument with yourself on who is to blame for this latest breakage, the stringer doing a poor string job or the player not being consistent. Tell me who wins this argument - yourself or yourself... :D
     

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