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receiving serve fault?

Discussion in 'General Forum' started by Ivan krivacka, Aug 21, 2006.

  1. Ivan krivacka

    Ivan krivacka Regular Member

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    Hello to all. long time listener, first time caller. Seriously, y'all have been very helpful, and I'm hoping that'll continue with the answering of this guestion.
    Lastnight I was playing and the person who was serving got on me for moving before serve. Here's my side of the story. My feet are set, and don't move. I'm somewhat relaxed, unprepared to receive serve while the server is getting set to serve (meening, their getting their feet in position, griping the bird as they like, ect.) Then, when they're in position, before they draw their racket back to strike the shuttle, I get in position, not moving my feet from there place, but bending my knees somewhat more and raising my racket about 6 to 8 inchs higher. This really put this person off, and they let me know about it during play. I had never had anyone say anything to me about this, and I've played with some people who are by the books. I looked up the rules and can only find mention of not moving your feet once there set, and I don't do that.
    Fault or not?
     
  2. badrad

    badrad Regular Member

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    as long as your feet remain stationary - (you aren't dancing around) it's perfectly valid. there is nothing in the rule book that restricts compressing your body (knees) or waving your racquet or any other movements. It's sometimes just good etiquette, also better opponents could use your movements to their service advantage.

    Although, sometimes off-court observers might notice if you inadvertently move your feet. However, make sure they are not misinterpreting raising your heels as you crouch as a fault either. As long as any part of both feet remain in it's stationary position, you are okay.
     
  3. Ivan krivacka

    Ivan krivacka Regular Member

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    thanks for that. I consider my movements slight, suttle even, exactly because my opponents could use it for an advantage. I know I look for a leen in my opponent.
     
  4. silentheart

    silentheart Regular Member

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    I think you are fine. Feet have to be stationary is the only thing mention in the rule book.
     
  5. cheongsa

    cheongsa Regular Member

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    Just show the fella a video of Sigit Budiarto returning a serve. He has not been called on a return-of-serve fault for waving his racquet whilst in the ready stance.
     
  6. Ivan krivacka

    Ivan krivacka Regular Member

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    seems I've seen a few poeple moving their racket around.
     
  7. LazyBuddy

    LazyBuddy Regular Member

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    As long as your feet did not move, I think you are fine. However, with different view angle from your opponents, they might think you moved your feet, instead of your knee / upper body. I think you can politely explain the situation to them. ;)
     
  8. Ivan krivacka

    Ivan krivacka Regular Member

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    I felt that I wasn't doing anything wrong, but she was so insistant and my partner agreed with her, so I took it for fact at first. Then I noticed that others we're doing the same thing, more or less, so I disagreed. All of this during a game, which is probably not the best time. Anyway, I'll see her on weds. Should I go up to her right away, or wait til it comes up again, I don't want to be confrontational or "I told you so-ish"? She plays in touraments and such, so she might want to know the rules;)
     
  9. LazyBuddy

    LazyBuddy Regular Member

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    I prefer to get a friendly off-court discussion prior to any games. During games, the emotion usually goes high, and it might effect the discussion in a negative way. Stay calm, and list all the fact and information you gathered. If she accepts the answer, it's all good. If not, try to consult with a reputable local coach/player, and hope for the best. ;)
     
  10. CoolDoo6

    CoolDoo6 Regular Member

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    I think waving your racket arround or making sudden movements while your opponent is trying to serve can become a fault if it distracts the opponent and she complains about it. I have come across some 'special' receiving techniques. But none are as effective as a normal one. If people do something special, they are commiting themselves in some way. This leaves them vulnerable in other ways. I find it a blast to force special receivers to abandon their special techniques in a matter of few deadly serves.
     
  11. LazyBuddy

    LazyBuddy Regular Member

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    I agree. All the "gray area special moves" might work in relatively low level of playing or social type of games. The "wonderful" results are more likely due to opponent's lackness of experience or skill. However, the "tricks" hardly could be anywhere effective during compeititive plays. ;)
     
  12. Ivan krivacka

    Ivan krivacka Regular Member

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    I assure you I'm not waving my racket around. Of course this is just my side of the story, but I feel confident in stating that it's a pretty suttle movement. I even asked others in the club and they had never noticed it. I agree with everyone who said excessive movement would be counter productive. I'm grateful to everyone who's responded. I don't want any conflict with this person (nor anyone else for that matter) but I alo don't want to be bullyed into change my game if I'm doing nothing wrong. Hopefully all of this independent judgement, coupled with the rule book, will have the last say.
     

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