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service

Discussion in 'Rules / Tournament Regulation / Officiating' started by rwg05, Oct 26, 2007.

  1. rwg05

    rwg05 Regular Member

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    As far as I know there's a rule that states that while serving, some part of both the feet of the server must remain in contact with the surface of the court in a stationary position until the serve is delivered.

    Does this mean that the server can, say, stand on his toes and then deliver the service?

    I did that during a match, and it was called to be a fault...
     
  2. kitseb

    kitseb Regular Member

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    I looked this up on the www.internationalbadminton.org website:
    9.1.3 some part of both feet of the server and the receiver shall remain in contact with the surface of the court in a stationary position from the start of the service (Law 9.2) until the service is delivered (Law 9.3);
    I stand on my tip toes as do a lot of other people - as far as I know so long as both feet are touching (and in the service court) then its OK. Perhaps they thought you lifted a foot?
     
  3. Linus

    Linus Regular Member

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    I was about the quote 9.1.3 too.

    It says "some part of both feet........shall remain in contact with the surface of the court", so if you are tip-toeing, it is not a fault.
     
  4. rwg05

    rwg05 Regular Member

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    no...the referee didn't think I lifted a foot - I showed him, after the match, what I had done and he said it was a fault

    guess he was wrong then...
     
  5. SystemicAnomaly

    SystemicAnomaly Regular Member

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    Difficult to believe that a ref would commit such an error since lifting one or both heels off the ground is very common for serving (particularly in doubles).

    Note that neither of your feet can slide from their initial position during the course of the serve (since some part of each foot must remain in contact in a stationary position). Is is possible that one (or both) of your feet moved from their initial position?
     
  6. 0ozafo0

    0ozafo0 Regular Member

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    wow
    then i better take some ballet lessons for farther reach XD
     
  7. rwg05

    rwg05 Regular Member

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    does the part of the foot off the ground (the heel) also have to remain in a stationary position? If thats the case, then the fault may have been rightly called since I could have moved my foot slightly upwards while serving...
     
  8. SystemicAnomaly

    SystemicAnomaly Regular Member

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    The way I am reading (interpreting) 9.1.3, I would not think raising the heels during the execution of the serve would constitute a fault. Anyone else have a take on this?
     
  9. kitseb

    kitseb Regular Member

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    I agree. The rule states that some part of both feet must be in contact with the court. I'm no expert, but from reading the rule unless your toes are not part of your feet :eek::eek::eek:, raising your heels should be fine.
     

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