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Share your thought. What would you do to turn the advantage to you:

Discussion in 'Techniques / Training' started by shooting stroke, Jul 17, 2012.

  1. shooting stroke

    shooting stroke Regular Member

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    Scenario 1: You’re playing double and at 28-29 down in the 2[SUP]nd[/SUP] set with serve in your hand. You’ve lost the 1[SUP]st[/SUP] set already.

    The reality from - the point of the possible outcome of the match
    -1 mistake by you be it your serve is out or goes into the net…….you will be defeated
    - Your serve is too loose and your opponent can easily pounce for a quick kill …………you will be defeated

    The usual reality from - the point of a player
    - If you’re the server and at this nerve wreaking situation, usually:
    You easily get nervous (hands shaking, hyperventilating etc)
    You thought can’t clearly plan your next strategy
    You flow of action tends to be in a rush

    What would you do to turn the advantage to you:

    - Ignore the above reality or it will just make you godly tense and nervous. Rather than thinking to make it even 29-29 to make it a sudden death tie, calmly just focus on taking I point at a time.

    - No need to rush to make your serve.

    - Focus and concentrate on your pre-serve preparation
    a. The nature of the way you serve – is the nature of your stance comfortable enough for you to react optimally the 2[SUP]nd[/SUP] hit after your serve if the birdie is directed to you?
    b. Have a clear mental initiative and habit to react quickly at the front court after your serve to make a constant reflection to your opponent that you’re dominating the frontcourt. Always held your racket head level high.
    c. Look at your partner readiness.. Preferably make a glance discussion about what you’re going to do and comfort each other. You’re not playing alone
    d. Once everything comfortably in order, focus and concentrate on your strategy before executing your serve.

    - Focus and concentrate on your serve
    a. Take a deep breath before you serve
    b. Be detail on the aspect of comfort on how you’re holding the shuttlecock and the nature of how your racket head and arm swing into position before making that serve……..are you comfortable?
    c. Decide, focus and be confident about the nature of your serve, its placement and trajectory (flick or short)
    d.In any case you hesitate, compose yourself back and repeat again the above approach.

    It seems to be a lengthy approach but when you play especially at the highest level of tournament and engage in the most intense situation, you can only have one specific objective in mind that is to gain that point and eventually hoping it will end with a win….and you need that every aspect of detail technicality to achieve that and it all starts with a serve.

    SS
     
  2. visor

    visor Regular Member

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    Sounds right and good in theory. But then if the opponent is good at mind games, he'll suddenly put up his hand to indicate he's not ready to receive. :p
     
  3. shooting stroke

    shooting stroke Regular Member

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    Mathias Boe has both side of this, calm and detail in preparing his serve and at the same time, very irritating as he frequently suddenly put up his hand to his opponent while at the receiving end.....
     
  4. AezranHakim

    AezranHakim Regular Member

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    Interesting to read :)
     
  5. Yuzo64

    Yuzo64 Regular Member

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    That situation will never occur in-game. You cannot lose a game on your serve during tie-break. If you're serving at 28 and the opponent is 29, it means that the point before was played at 27-29 : the game should have been lost already :p

    Anyway : you're being over-complicated. The more the situation is tense, the less you need to think.

    Take a deep breath, and serve as usual, or that's where you'lle make an error :)
    Or if you really feel you need to change it up (like a flick serve), do it, but the key is to FEEL it while having enough confidence to do so. If you can't live with your error afterwards, then don't do it.
     
  6. Cheung

    Cheung Moderator

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    Usually, what I would do is to change the angle of the shuttle hitting more outwards. Also put more pace in the shuttle so it will still fall in the court and thirdly, totally ignore the receiver - just concentrate on the net.
     
  7. |_Footwork_|

    |_Footwork_| Regular Member

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    just play like you did the 57 points before. as a competitive player, you should not feel uncomfortable in these situations, you should love them!!

    "when the going gets tough, the tough get going."
     
  8. b.leung

    b.leung Regular Member

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    In situations like this I always focus only on the point at hand.
    A more probable situation is 19-20 with service. Also a 18-19 situation is pretty intense too.
    Of course, there will be times where you will have to strategize a few points ahead; especially if you're down a several points and working to swing the momentum, etc.

    Sometimes I play mind games with the opponents.
    If they were up by several points and my partner and I have gained the momentum again, I purposefully do more net shots (I'm predominantly at the net) and force them to make mistakes.
    Upon winning a point on the opponents' mistake(s) I will pause a bit longer before my serve so they have time to think about their mistake, but not enough time to think of a solution to correct the mistake.
    If we win the point after being on the defensive the whole rally, I will do the silent arm raise to show a bit of defiance and confidence.
     
  9. MSeeley

    MSeeley Regular Member

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    I love these pressure situations on my serve! I find it really focuses my mind on producing an excellent short service, and thats when I play all of my best serves!
     
  10. shooting stroke

    shooting stroke Regular Member

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    Couldn't agree more:D

    . Sometimes you just need that extra pressure to bring out the best out of you at crucial moments like this and sometimes it is not just your serve that seems to be incredibly excellent but your next following hits also tends to be infected with that pressure and out of nowhere you start to produce winning hits............and the best part.......your partner also seems to do the same as well:p.
     
  11. TheSmasherKing

    TheSmasherKing Regular Member

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    thanx for sharing bro... i agree that calmness is the key factor when u r 28-29 down... :) and we also need luck on our side at the crucial stage... :)
     
  12. Heong

    Heong Regular Member

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    I would say...

    Don't think too much, just serve. :)

    Instead of a 28-29, think of it as a 0-0 situation and you won't be as pressured on the service. Say to yourself you got nothing to lose
     

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