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Should I start off with an manual or electronic stringing machine?

Discussion in 'Badminton Stringing Techniques & Tools' started by ant01, Sep 6, 2012.

  1. ant01

    ant01 Regular Member

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    I've been wanting to get a stringing machine for a while now, but the dilemma that I'm having is whether I should start off with an electronic or manual one.

    My preference would be for an electronic machine mainly because of the accuracy of the pulls, but also my electronic strung ones seem to feel better too. The racquets that I get hand strung from a shop always seem at least a few lbs lower than the electronic strung ones which I did abroad at the same tension (around 25/26lbs). I guess that I could get around the difference in tension by stringing to a higher tension by hand, but I'm not sure if it would feel the same.

    What do you guys think? :confused:

    Edit: ugh just realised grammar mistake in the title...can't change it but nevermind
     
    #1 ant01, Sep 6, 2012
    Last edited: Sep 6, 2012
  2. R20190

    R20190 Regular Member

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    The decision is yours at the end of the day as it's your money.

    Electronic is always better, if money is no object or if you anticipate a lot of business get an electronic. But I think you'd probably learn more using a manual machine first. I've been using my crank 6-point machine for about 7 years and it's been great, my local sports shops also use manual machines too and are quite happy.

    With a manual machine, you get a sense and feel of tension more and if things go wrong with the machine, it's not so bad to fix yourself.

    When I say manual, I'm basically referring to crank machines. I wouldn't really consider drop weight unless I was on a really tight budget.

    Hope that helps!
     
  3. Mark A

    Mark A Regular Member

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    If you can honestly afford an electronic machine, I say get one - I spent three years on a manual before getting mine, and I've never looked back. More consistent tensions, constant pull, no regular calibration needed...
     
  4. ant01

    ant01 Regular Member

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    Contradictory opinions, I like it :cool:

    I wanted to get a stringing machine primarily for my own interests, re-stringing racquets for other people would be a side thing that I'd do at a later time. I have been thinking that as long as the price isn't too high then I will get an electronic one but choosing the right machine is a tough choice too, and I do like to pre-stretch some of my strings.

    They sell this electronic one at my local shop which doesn't seem too bad, but maybe you guys might have a better idea? http://www.tennisnuts.com/shop/othe.../centring-professional-electronic-724519.html
     
  5. R20190

    R20190 Regular Member

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    Blimey gov', 1500 quid primarily for interest? :eek:
     
  6. ant01

    ant01 Regular Member

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    For my own use and friends to be more accurate :p I'd be buying it with my brother to soften the blow too. £1500 is still a lot cheaper than other models I've seen but of course I'd do a lot more research before I actually go for one.
     
  7. CanucksDynasty

    CanucksDynasty Regular Member

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    Go for the Electronic. Only problem I see is where it'll be stored and sharing aspects. OK if living under the same roof (ie. with parents). But what happens when you or your brother move out? What happens when you or your brother wants to sell it cuz one of you needs $$ badly? Who gets to keep it at the end?
     
  8. Mark A

    Mark A Regular Member

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    ant - get a decent manual and bang a WISE on it - you'll get change out of £700.
     
  9. R20190

    R20190 Regular Member

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    Agreed. You then have a choice of both crank and electronic. And have one tensioner as a back up.

    I did consider getting a WISE tensioner a couple of years back, but they were like £600+... how much are they going for these days?
     
  10. TimothyHsu

    TimothyHsu Regular Member

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    Wise head is like 500 usd now I think
     
  11. nws56

    nws56 Regular Member

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    manual vs. electronic

    Can I be the only one recommending a drop weight for the ultimate in accuracy ? Never needing calibration , providing a wonderful visual indication of string stretch , these machines are only marginally slower to apply tension to the string . You're going to spend proportionally far more time threading , weaving and clamping . The whine from the electronic head would drive me mad , but I love the simple aesthetic of the solid,smooth,silent falling weight .
     
  12. silentheart

    silentheart Regular Member

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    OK, If you wan to get the machine you mentioned in Tennisnut, make sure you can return it if you can not string badminton racquet with it.
    If money is not an object, you will not be checking out the lower end electric machine. Also, the clamps are for tennis, not for badminton. If you are going to make some money stringing on the side, it will take more than 1 year to recover your investment.
    IMHO, you can still do a good job with a manual (crank or drop weight) as long as you know how what is the short coming of each type and spend a lot of time on this forum to figure out how to do a good stringing job.
    Good luck.
     
  13. kakinami

    kakinami Regular Member

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    ES5 Protech or wait for Protech 8. I have had ES5 Pro for 6 years and so far so good no problems. It is one of the best machines in the world if not the best for badminton. It is used at all the Yonex tournaments as well as the 2012 Olympic games, Tennis and Badminton. We did have a Protech 8 there too.
     
  14. ant01

    ant01 Regular Member

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    Thanks all for the advice. I will be doing more research and look into these WISE tensioners :)
     
  15. Mark A

    Mark A Regular Member

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    I wonder what a kidney goes for these days...
     
  16. Cheung

    Cheung Moderator

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    You wise guys. :D


    I would suppose it depends on the level of play you are going for. If you do a lot of competitions, carry about 4 racquets in the bag and using BG66, then yes, I would think you do a lot of restrings and an electronic one is worth it. If you are working and can afford it, then electronic is also worth the cash - the word is "indulgence".

    I used to do 24lbs on a drop weight which was quite enough for me. It wasn't until a lot of training time later (with technique changes) and hundreds and thousands of shuttles in practice sessions that I now prefer 28 to 30 lbs and now take it to a specialist badminton shop to get done. The shop changed to an electronic machine overtime but I'm not convinced I can feel a difference. Perhaps it was due to the skill of the stringer when he used the manual machine - he was very good.
     
  17. Pete LSD

    Pete LSD Regular Member

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    He was very good? What happened to him now? Did you change stringer? :)

     
  18. bazzaman

    bazzaman Regular Member

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    I would definitely go for ECP if doing higher tensions. Without ECP you have to double pull which is a pain otherwise 28lbs feels like 25lbs after a few hours.

    Or I could do what Cheung does and give it to Luxis to string.
     
  19. Cheung

    Cheung Moderator

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    He gave the stringing to somebody else to do. Initially, the feel wasn't quite the same. Then I got injured for a long time and didn't need racquets strung. When I came back, I used a different stringer but suddenly decided to try Luxis again. They changed to an electronic machine and the feel of the stringing is very good although it is not Mr Ng who does the stringing now.

    That's why you recently seen me a bit more on the strings subforum.:)

    Mr Ng runs a number of coaching sessions.
     
  20. Optiblue

    Optiblue Regular Member

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    to be honest, I've strung only once with a manual crank before I retired it and replaced it with the WISE Head. Best decision I've ever made and never looked back! The only time I'd string manually is if my WISE head needed service, but so far, it's been running like a champ for a few years!
     

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