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Singapore did well in World Junior Championship, but...

Discussion in '2006 Tournaments' started by Linus, Nov 6, 2006.

  1. Linus

    Linus Regular Member

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    In the just concluded team event in the World Junior Championship in Korea, team Singapore did well to finish 6th overall. Notably they defeat England the previous round to force the 5-6th place play off with Japan.

    The standings are:
    Rank/Country:
    1st: Korea
    2nd: China
    3rd: Malaysia
    4th: Indonesia
    5th: Japan
    6th: Singapore
    7th: Thailand
    8th: India
    9th: Chinese Taipei
    10th: England
    11th: Germany
    12th: Russia
    13th: Denmark
    14th: Netherland
    15th: Czech Republic
    16th: Turkey
    17th: Hong Kong
    18th: Ukraine
    19th: Vietnam
    20th: USA
    21st: Canada
    22nd: Bulgaria
    23rd: New Zealand
    24th: Australia
    25th: Philippines
    26th: Pakistan
    27th: South Africa
    28th: Egypt

    Look at where our Juniors are ahead of the likes of England and Demark is amazing. But the immediate question spring to mind is: whilst our Juniors did well at this stage of their badminton life, why we could not make similar achievement in the senior level? We struggle to consistently qualify for the Thomas Cup and Uber Cup finals.

    Even in individual events, the likes of Thailand, India and Hong Kong can even boast more competitive players than we have at the senior level comeptitions.

    It appears there is no continuity (Kendrick Lee is a good example). Was it because of there are much more choices available in our society that these Juniors would put badminton as a lesser priority ine their career choice? Or was there lack of management and coaching of these yound talents when they reach adulthood?

    Anyone cares to share their insights?
     
  2. lightsmash

    lightsmash Regular Member

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    Hey Linus,

    You know, when I was much younger(when I was in primary school) I used to go fishing alot. Thats prolly because its the only place my dad will bring me along with him. Because of the regular visits, I began to think I like fishing.
    But now, I realise I enjoy diving more...in fact I dont fish anymore. My dad still enjoy fishing though.
    Ok back to the main topic, how many of the Juniors you mentioned truly love badminton for the game? Many of them, in fact are too young to know what they really enjoy doing. I believe most were told what to do rather than telling what they want to do, so its only natural that many will stray away from badminton when they reach adulthood.
     
  3. Loh

    Loh Regular Member

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    When one is young, especially when in primary school, the parents dictate what is 'good' for the child. Unfortunately, most parents still feel that 'study hard is better than play hard' as with a good education and good academic results, one's future will be more secure. So our children spend more time studying than training in sports. The paper chase is still very much preferred.

    Although the mindset of some parents is changing in that they allow their sports talented children to attend the only Sports School in Singapore, this started only about 3 years ago. The talent pool is still very small and the SBA has resorted to importing talented badminton players from time to time to fill the gaps so as to maintain the popularity of badminton in Singapore. If the BWF as the world badminton body is able to attract more sponsors who are able to raise the prize moneys of international tournaments, as they will for the Super Series next year, more will be attracted to make badminton their profession. Once parents feel that their children can make a living from sports, they will be more comfortable.

    Then our talented juniors, who are now ranked a creditable 6th in the world, will be more inclined to take up badminton more seriously and move on to fill the ranks of the seniors in due course. Then we will be able to field teams of players that are worthy of the high standards of the Thomas, Uber and Sudirman Cups.

    But we need time to train champions and the SBA, with the help of the Sports School and the Sports Council, already have action plans to ensure we are on the right track.

    As someone has said, give us another 10 years to place ourselves in a more secure and firm foundation. Hopefully, we can shorten this time to show some good results that will encourage and inspire all involved to aspire for higher goals.
     
    #3 Loh, Nov 6, 2006
    Last edited: Nov 6, 2006
  4. modious

    modious Regular Member

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    It's true. In some other local forums, people were questioning the need for the Sports Hub. Saying it's a waste of taxpayer's money, why the need for S'poreans to excel in sports, blah blah blah.


    Hopefully I can contribute something in the areas of psychology and physiotherapy once I complete my studies (Bachelor, then Masters... :( ). It will take quite a while!

    or maybe just apply for PR in Australia? :eek:
     
  5. Sealman

    Sealman Regular Member

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    I am just curious. How many 'imported' players are there in this Junior team?
     
  6. Loh

    Loh Regular Member

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    Singapore's Junior Representatives

    These are the names I managed to fish out from the result postings by Sandy:

    Boys:

    1. Derek Wong Zi Liang
    2. Jonathan Tang Yew Loong
    3. Terry Yeo Zhao Jiang
    4. Thng Boon Seong, and
    5. Chen Guo Rui

    All first 4 are local-born Singaporeans who have been training full time. Not sure whether Chen is Singaporean.

    Girls:

    1. Siti Noor Ashikin Leman
    2. Thng Ting Ting
    3. Jill Vanessa Poo
    4. Colleen Goh Li En

    I believe all 4 are local-born Singaporeans.

    5. Sari Shinta Mulia
    6. Xing Aiying

    Both are imported talents and are now Singapore citizens, Xing for sure.

    Apart from Sari and Xing, Siti is training full time. The other girls are still studying; Ting Ting in the Sports School, Jill in Secondary School and Colleen in JC

    Not all of the above players took part in the team events, I think. All participated in the individual events still ongoing. But I think all were knocked out except for Derek Wong (singles and doubles with Jonathan Tang and Jonathan and Sari in XD.

    Disappointed that Xing, our best hope in WS, could not advance further even though she was seeded. Apart from Sari and Siti, I do not expect the others to do well in such a competitive field. Hopefully, they have gained from the experience. Let's hope Derek Wong can do us proud by advancing to the QF in MS.

    As expected, Korea and even Japan seem to be playing well.
     
    #6 Loh, Nov 7, 2006
    Last edited: Nov 7, 2006
  7. ants

    ants Regular Member

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    Don't worry Loh.. in time Spore will do well.
     
  8. Iwan

    Iwan Regular Member

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    Here is an interesting thought to think about though: Prior to the rise of Singapore Sports School, how far did Singapore manage to rise up that ladder? I don't know the answer, but most probably not higher. It is indicating that this newer batch of boys is doing better than their older batch. They are making a difference in my view. And whilst their seniors may not have made it well in the international stage, they may make that difference as well.

    One thing though, I've been hearing that this batch of Sports School Players are really tough to coach because they do not have self motivation inside of them. Some were saying that they get shouted at a lot to get them moving right. As a coach myself, this is an indication that their hearts needs to be trained a bit more to love the sport that they play. However, if the rumours weren't true, then my bad :p All the best for the sports school players.

    Oh, and Chen Guo Rui is a local I believe. The only boy that Sports School sent to Guangzhou Training Centre for 3 months I heard.
     
  9. taneepak

    taneepak Regular Member

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    There is a world of difference between the top world senior players and their junior counterparts. Juniors are mostly amateurs, school boys or girls, and mentally not as matured. To ensure that top junior players do well in the senior ranks they must turn professional and dedicate their future to badminton. In addition you have to have enough of these players, because one or two promising ones do not have the firm grassroots or numbers to flower. That is why China is streets ahead of the other countries in developing juniors to be world beaters, even if their juniors do not come out no. 1.
     
  10. Loh

    Loh Regular Member

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    Yes, I agree with Taneepak.

    Compared with before and now, badminton has been made more popular, in no small part owing to the determined efforts of the now BWF (ex-IBF) and the national badminton associations to ensure badminton's continued existence in the Olympics. A number of hitherto 'unknown' countries are now taking up this game more seriously. Fresh talents from both the East and the West have propped up from time to time. The recent Denmark Open 2006 has really opened our eyes.

    Relatively unknown Poland’s Kostiuczyk and Augustyn beat the experienced English pair of Gail Emms and Donna Kellogg in straight games to clinch the WD title. The Russian players have also been in the news although they haven't captured any major title yet. These players are now no 'push-overs' as before. They have improved, perhaps with better coaching and better facilities and the fact that some of the retired players from China are now allowed to coach in other countries to share their knowledge and expertise.

    That is perhaps one reason why our own Kendrick Lee and Ronald Susilo (apart from his Achilles tendon injury) are at a standstill, not moving ahead from their old position and even got behind. The competition is getting hotter and tougher!

    If our young aspirants from the junior ranks think that they have arrived and should be accorded 'star' treatment, they will be sorely disappointed. A World Junior Championship like the one currently held in Incheon, South Korea, is timely to put them in their right places and to let them know where they stand in world badminton.

    Commitment, enthusiasm, discipline, hard work, an ever willingness to learn, humbleness (like what Lee Chong Wei possesses) plus a mental resolve to be the best one can be must never be relegated if one is to succeed in the ever demanding world of competitive badminton.

    So our Sports School trainees must learn not to make themselves 'difficult' to be coached. The sooner they learn this the better for their badminton prowess.
     
    #10 Loh, Nov 8, 2006
    Last edited: Nov 8, 2006
  11. Jun Wei

    Jun Wei Regular Member

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    Yeah I sort of agree. Sometimes, life play tricks on us all:crying: . The most talented player might not necessary love the sport most. They might just stray away from the sport later in their years.
     
  12. scottelfy

    scottelfy Regular Member

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    i believe the govt is not helping enough. The education system in Singapore is so 'paper based' that many top players dare not commit so much to badminton as they and their family are afraid that without a cert in singapore, u cant survive. with this mentality, SG will find it extremely difficult to rise to top ranks like china when the govt provide schemes for the players
     
  13. storkbill

    storkbill Regular Member

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    Are you willing to accept a tax increase to pay for increased govt funding of Singapore sports?

    If govt wants to fund social assistance programs for the poor by increasing taxes, already so many complaints... :D
     
  14. scottelfy

    scottelfy Regular Member

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    i didnt say funding but give players an alternative path or a 'backup" plan for players so they willing or dare to go all out to pursue badminton
     
  15. Loh

    Loh Regular Member

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    ;)
    That's why as a good compromise, the Singapore Sports School is established to allow sports talented students to continue with their studies even up to university level if they can make it. Their lessons are arranged to suit their 'sports timetable' and credits are earned once students completed their assignments/projects.

    Now, just like some of the 'O' level graduates who turned professional early this year, they make a personal commitment and 'sacrifice' to train full time to achieve international success. I suppose they really want to know how far they can go if they put in their best efforts. The SBA does have a programme to compensate them and if they win honours for themselves and the country, financial incentives and other arrangements are available when the time comes for them to retire.

    But the talented must be bold enough to make the move first! And they can only do this when they are young, not when they are past 21, 25 or 30! ;)
     
  16. scottelfy

    scottelfy Regular Member

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    Thanks for letting me know. cos i have been considering going full time. i didnt noe that had financial plans to compensate players as what i have heard. thanks for sharing
     
  17. westwood_13

    westwood_13 Regular Member

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    so I'm a few weeks late for this, but I'm super psyched about #21.

    Hooray for my lab partner/friend who barely trains and semi-friend who spends six hours a day training!

    I'm just excited that they got to go, and made it past first round. It's so hard for North Americans to do well on the world stage.

    Although perhaps if the CDN government funded us to train, that would help our results. Not like they care, since it's not hockey, speed skating, skiing, or any other sport in the winter olympics...
     

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