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Skill-wise Mentality

Discussion in 'Techniques / Training' started by Yasukin, Jul 28, 2006.

  1. Yasukin

    Yasukin New Member

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    Hello there,
    My friend and I are in a very peculiar situation. We've been playing for roughly 1.5 years now, playing with recreational players that have an aptitude for proper technique and tactics. Consequently we've learned the basics of gameplay and strokes, and we're currently experimenting with the more advanced techniques and strokes. We mainly play Men's Doubles.

    The problem however, arises in game. We can hold our own against solid B-level players, however when we play others with equal or "lesser" skill, we end up making far too many mistakes to count.

    I'm not sure what the source of the problem is. The two of us aren't exactly the most consistent of players. I know it's deeper than just "good day/bad day," we were thinking that playing the latter group doesn't ignite the fire of competition in us. Becoming arseholes and playing mercilessly probably isn't the best solution either, and it hasn't worked so far :mad:

    This must be a result of our mental approach to the game. I looked up the article on Mental Toughness, but that doesn't pertain to our situation. Is there anything else that we may have overlooked? Has anybody else experienced this?
     
  2. stumblingfeet

    stumblingfeet Regular Member

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    Perhaps the B-level players aren't playing quite at full intensity when they play against you, whereas the others are?

    If you want to define skill level, then perhaps it should be as how well you play when you're playing badly. Don't worry too much about it though, 1-1/2 years is not a long time to be playing badminton, it is quite possible that you're not yet recognizing the small things that players of apparently "lesser" skill might be doing that is effective, or perhaps the lower than maximum intensity displayed by the more "advanced" players.

    I know that personally when I play with friends that have less playing experience than me, I'll tend to try more crazy shots, play a little more unconventionally, etc. It'll usually end up in a pretty tight game. But when I face them in a tournament, then I just play a simple efficient game to win as quickly as possible.
     
  3. chessymonkey

    chessymonkey Regular Member

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    perheps when u go up against a stronger opponents
    u subconsiously fall back into making simple shots that u have most confidence on. And usually those r more effective and stable instead
    of trying fancy/trick touches when u play against player of same or under skill level.
     
  4. jerby

    jerby Regular Member

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    when playing with/against those people try to keep your game simple. if you keep messing up on the same futile trick shot 4 times in a row is tedious for all players.
    Keep it simple, and don't make mistakes. and if you are playign people of lower skill and want to have a fun (and possibly tight) game: less killer smashes. no finishing shots! give them a chance to attack.
    if playing against same-skilled players: keep it simple and effective..
     
  5. ^Tayo^

    ^Tayo^ Regular Member

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    You guys simply need to bring your game to a higher notch. Between C and B division there aren't much difference, you guys should accept that some games can turn into an upset. Solid B players have strong mental, enough to come back and catch up the points during the game.

    If you and your partner have chemistry problem, it's probably because you guys don't rotate so well. If you happen to lose by a lot of points, you guys should train your mental to become hungry on getting points back and at least close the gap.

    One excellent way to reach that level is to practice your gameplay at returning/aiming every shots on the tramlines. If you have power, aim the body. If you're a safe player, smash and return at the middle often. I know it's hard and demanding but that's how the pros forge their mentals/consistency/strategies. In other words, you guys need to get back at the very basics. Using the tramlines as a targe game requires a lot of patience and training but if you play enough (at least 4-6 times per week)... your level will eventually get there in no time.

    Cheers!
     
  6. Kamen

    Kamen Regular Member

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    i second your advice.
     
  7. Monster

    Monster Regular Member

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    How about changing partner to play against the same people? Maybe it's you or your partner or both?

    But with 1.5 years of playing experience, there's no point getting alarmed about. I've played for ~7 years and I still have problems with doubles frequently esp when switching partners. It's like getting a new girlfriend and you have to build your trust and understanding again. :)
     
  8. Oggie

    Oggie Regular Member

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    my partner (former) & I do this whenever we need to review our moves. and it worked for us. during the switching, we realize our weaknesses since my partner is not compensating for my weakness & vice versa. likewise, you can check your partner's weaknesses and strenghts. after the game, we talk about it and work on it to improve our team-up. at one time, I realized i need to improve my footwork (so i hired a coach for that purpose), and my partner thought he had been weak mentally, the fighting spirit crumbles whenever the other team gets the upper hand. sigh.... i miss the games......
     

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