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SP Hip Hop

Discussion in 'Badminton Stringing Techniques & Tools' started by Pete LSD, Mar 12, 2011.

  1. Pete LSD

    Pete LSD Regular Member

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    GrandMaster Tedski informed he got a Hip Hop. I am awaiting for him to arrange a Stringing 101 Party. :D
     
  2. Tedski

    Tedski Regular Member

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    It is about time ...........

    Oh well, I was on the french for a long time and thanks to Pete_LSD push me over the deep end, I pick up the Silent Partner Hip Hop from "Ouchee" couple nights ago. (btw, Ouchee is awesome seller, offers all kind of help to get me start again) I finally have a chance to set it all up last night.

    The memory of stringing my own racquets is a bit hazy, the last time was closed to 30 years ago for my trusty cab 8 on a 2pt drop weight machine. I took my time to setup the supports and get it all secure, certainly the days of using awls instead of clamps is very different; it took me a while to get use to the fix clamps, so I end up using the flying clamps to start my mains. It sail through the main rather quickly as I am a descent handy person, and coming from my sport fishing and fly tying background, I have always working with my hands on small objects certainly helps the process.

    It does took me sometime to get my first share grommet, as I do not have a proper string puller; I end up using the hockey skate lace puller and that get the job done. The cross take almost twice the time as the mains which is expected. Overall, it took me about hour and a half to finish the whole process. It is a T2 with BG80, I have string it with lower tension of 24x26lb compare to my usual tension of 26x28lb. The end result is not bad, head shape and racquet length is identical to my other T2. I won't be able to play until Wednesday coming week, so that will be the time for the big test of the job.

    Overall, very enjoyable and I am looking forward to string up a couple more racquet next week. Also, thanks to BF forum here for all the stringing tips and links to stringing videos, it certainly make it a lot easier.

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    Ted
     
  3. Pete LSD

    Pete LSD Regular Member

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    Congrat to GrandMaster Tedski for joining the club! Your fishing background certainly speed things up!
     
  4. CovinaStringer

    CovinaStringer Regular Member

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    Congrats on your purchase! I'm curious why you did not use the swivle clamps on the mains.
     
  5. Fidget

    Fidget Regular Member

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    Congratulations Tedski.
    Fishermen, seamstresses, card dealers and harp players probably all have the finger skills to be very quick with stringing.

    You have the same set up as my SP Crump, except drop-weight instead of crank. The fixed clamps are a little stiff at first, but they work in. You were right to switch from the SP badminton C-clamps to the K-clamp. It's easier on the frame.

    Love the Black and Decker WorkMate stand. :) Yours must be sturdier than mine, because I wouldn't dare put my machine on that wobbly thing.
     
  6. Tedski

    Tedski Regular Member

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    Fidget is right about those clamps, it was a bit stiff, so I just use the flying clamps because it is quicker. They seems to be working fine when I was stringing the cross.

    That B&D workmate is over 25 years old, likely to be one of those made in Canada products ;)
     
  7. CovinaStringer

    CovinaStringer Regular Member

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    If you clean the contact surfaces with alcohol, then wipe the guide rails with a PTFE (teflon) oil, they will glide like ice on the rails. I let the PTFE Oil soak in first before wiping off any residue.
     
  8. Pete LSD

    Pete LSD Regular Member

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    I still have a B&D (Made in Canada) trimmer in working condition ;).

     
  9. Mark A

    Mark A Regular Member

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    This works wonders - I can flick my clamps from one side of the rails to the other with no effort these days; the only thing more effective would be an air bearing. Make sure it's dry PTFE spray (aka chain lube) so it doesn't leave a residue; I use the same stuff on my mousemat.

    If there's crud/corrosion on the rails you can rub them down with (very) fine wet/dry sandpaper, which should be wet, before applying the Teflon - I'm talking 1000+ grit (the stuff used to blend the layers of auto paint), as you need a mirror finish.
     
  10. Pete LSD

    Pete LSD Regular Member

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    Regular use of PTFE or very light machine oil will keep those clamps working smoothly. Also, wipe the inside of the clamps once in a while to clean off the string residue.
     
  11. Tedski

    Tedski Regular Member

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    Wow, thanks guys, some really good tips. What a coincidence, just bought a bottle of dry PTFE last week thinking it is about time to tune up my mountain bike before spring riding.

    Will report back once I finish the tune up on the Hip Hop. ;)

    Ted
     
  12. CovinaStringer

    CovinaStringer Regular Member

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    The dry PTFE is good for the gripper bearings. I use CLP Break Free PTFE oil, a military grade gun oil, which I use on my rails. I also use Finish Line Teflon Grease for the clamps and gripper bearings.
     
  13. Tedski

    Tedski Regular Member

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    Pete ......... patience ....... it is coming.......
     
  14. druss

    druss Regular Member

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    So how do you like the quality iof the sp machine? I have the sp crump and I think it's a great machine. I've just ordered the wise head for it and am looking forward to the prestretch and precision. it's too bad they no longer make stringing machines though.
     
  15. Tedski

    Tedski Regular Member

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    I am no expert on stringing machine, but I do have experience with lots of precise machinery; overall, the SP machine is very well build and solid. I do have plans to make some custom shoulder supports, as I get access to a full machine shop so it shouldn't be too hard.
     
  16. CovinaStringer

    CovinaStringer Regular Member

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    Even though SP no longer sells stringing machines, many of it's parts can found on other machines, though most of them are in Europe.
     

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