Thanks for visiting us!

Badminton Central is a free community for fans of badminton! If you find anything useful here please consider registering to see more content and get involved with our great community users, it takes less than 15 seconds! Everybody is welcome here.

Click here for a FREE account!

Sport Psychology in Badminton

Discussion in 'Techniques / Training' started by macazteeg, Mar 29, 2009.

  1. JustinG

    JustinG Regular Member

    Joined:
    Mar 28, 2009
    Messages:
    207
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Ottawa
    Yes, I do believe that Mozart had to work extremely hard to write his music; infact, it has been documented that he was obbsessed with his music, and refining his craft. I am sorry but I have to correct you, Mozart was not self-taught. His father is/was one of the best known composers of his time and created some terrific works. Mozart was not born a genius (prodigy) he was created as so through his unique upbringing and passion to learn.

    I agree that everyone is unique and has different gifts, but this is largley shaped by experiences (or lack there of) not genetics.
     
  2. chris-ccc

    chris-ccc Regular Member

    Joined:
    Apr 1, 2006
    Messages:
    26,910
    Likes Received:
    11
    Occupation:
    Professional Badminton Coach & Badminton Promoter
    Location:
    Melbourne, Victoria, Australia
    Mozart was not self-taught

    .
    We learn as we observe/study how others do it. And we can be taught by a teacher/coach, and/or we can copy how others do it.

    The bottom line is 'We still need "others" to help us to be taught'.

    IMHO, 'self-taught' only applies when we invent/introduce something new that others have not done/known it before. And usually, it's just a modification of others' know-how.
    .
     
    #142 chris-ccc, Apr 23, 2010
    Last edited: Apr 23, 2010
  3. amleto

    amleto Regular Member

    Joined:
    Feb 12, 2008
    Messages:
    2,765
    Likes Received:
    19
    Location:
    UK
    then your opinion goes against the definition of self-taught.
     
  4. chris-ccc

    chris-ccc Regular Member

    Joined:
    Apr 1, 2006
    Messages:
    26,910
    Likes Received:
    11
    Occupation:
    Professional Badminton Coach & Badminton Promoter
    Location:
    Melbourne, Victoria, Australia
    We still need "others" to help us to be taught

    .
    Perhaps I think of the definition of self-taught differently. What I mentioned was:- 'We still need "others" to help us to be taught'.

    Just look at the many 'Teach Yourself' books available. In a way, we are still taught by the authors of the books.
    .
     
    #144 chris-ccc, Apr 23, 2010
    Last edited: Apr 23, 2010
  5. andreee

    andreee New Member

    Joined:
    Aug 1, 2010
    Messages:
    2
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    st.louis
    Hey,
    This is so nice you are player too. i also love psychology subject and i also wanna get degree in that. so if any question arised in front then i will ask from you.

    cheers!!

    ______________
     
  6. andreee

    andreee New Member

    Joined:
    Aug 1, 2010
    Messages:
    2
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    st.louis
    Hey,
    This is so nice you are player too. i also love psychology subject and i also wanna get degree in that. so if any question arised in front then i will ask from you.

    cheers!!

    ______________
    brainwave activation
     
  7. macazteeg

    macazteeg Regular Member

    Joined:
    Mar 27, 2009
    Messages:
    82
    Likes Received:
    0
    Occupation:
    Psychologist
    Location:
    Philippines
    yes and thanks! im still accepting questions so just post it here in the topics and i will answer as soon as i could, keep em questions coming please :)
     
  8. visor

    visor Regular Member

    Joined:
    Dec 7, 2009
    Messages:
    13,529
    Likes Received:
    267
    Location:
    Vancouver, BC
    Vizualization of shot : When I remember to or have enough time to do it, visualizing the shot just before I make it has helped make my shots very accurate. Has anyone else have this experience too?
     
  9. amleto

    amleto Regular Member

    Joined:
    Feb 12, 2008
    Messages:
    2,765
    Likes Received:
    19
    Location:
    UK
    oh, good resurrection.
     
  10. latecomer

    latecomer Regular Member

    Joined:
    Sep 6, 2012
    Messages:
    1,075
    Likes Received:
    45
    Occupation:
    selfemploy
    Location:
    aberdeen
    That's exactly what good golfers do.
     
  11. Borbor

    Borbor Regular Member

    Joined:
    Aug 2, 2012
    Messages:
    354
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Canada
    Not just golfers, race car drivers do it as well. So do gymnasts, figure skaters, archers to name a few.
     
  12. visor

    visor Regular Member

    Joined:
    Dec 7, 2009
    Messages:
    13,529
    Likes Received:
    267
    Location:
    Vancouver, BC
    Interesting. I always knew visualizing before the game is important, but doing it just before a shot makes a huge difference to me. Somehow I feel as if my brain and muscles are acting as one and does exactly what I had intended. I'll have to remember to do this more often.

    Also, this thread has a lot of excellent advice re application of psychology in the game.
     
  13. Borbor

    Borbor Regular Member

    Joined:
    Aug 2, 2012
    Messages:
    354
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Canada
    Yes, because the visualization is the dress rehearsal. Your brain doesn't know the difference (on the subconscious level) between whether you physically hit the shuttle or not. So when you actually need to do it, it's pretty straightforward because you've done it once already.

    Which is exactly why it's always important to focus using a positive frame. Instead of "don't hit it out", one needs to focus "hit it on the line" The mind doesn't process "don't". Use the first thought and 9 times out of 10 that bird is going to go out. Read the line "DON'T think of a pink elephant" and what do you think happens? ;)
     
  14. visor

    visor Regular Member

    Joined:
    Dec 7, 2009
    Messages:
    13,529
    Likes Received:
    267
    Location:
    Vancouver, BC
    Yes, not using "dont" is part of positive framing. Like telling yourself to calm down instead of don't be anxious, or serve over the tape instead of don't serve into the net. The internal dialogue has to be positive and avoid negatives.
     
  15. pBmMalaysia

    pBmMalaysia Regular Member

    Joined:
    Dec 15, 2009
    Messages:
    4,748
    Likes Received:
    0
    Occupation:
    badminton coach
    Location:
    Kuching, Malaysia, Malaysia
    Turning negative thoughts that keep coming to you especially during competitions has better results. :D
     
  16. StefanDO

    StefanDO Regular Member

    Joined:
    Apr 17, 2012
    Messages:
    72
    Likes Received:
    0
    Occupation:
    PhD student (Neuropsychology)
    Location:
    Dortmund, Germany
    Another psychologist...

    Hi all!

    I've been reading through the entire thread - lots of interesting questions and suggestions (though I must admit I don't agree with everything).

    I'm a psychologist myself, graduated about 4 years ago, and shortly after I started playing badminton a few times a week. I neither specialized on sports psychology nor have I taken part in courses related to sports psychology. However, most general concepts of psychology are not so difficult to apply to special areas like sports, and that's what I did. I think my game improved from that, and I'd like to share thoughts if anyone has any questions related to "mind-skills" in badminton or how to approach some situations in order to hopefully succeed.

    Maybe in order not to be seen as "another Sigmund Freud", I shortly say what I'm specialized on. After graduation I started my PhD in the field of Neuropsychology, more specifically my research deals with differences between active and observational learning from feedback. I often put this into the context of badminton, e.g. what's going on in the brain and what are the effects when I learn from negative feedback (lost rallyes due to e.g. mishis) or positive feedback (won rallye due to e.g. clever shot) or when I learn from the observation of others getting this feedback. Despite this specialization, however, I hope I can also still remember more general theories to give comments on this and that if requested. :)
     
  17. visor

    visor Regular Member

    Joined:
    Dec 7, 2009
    Messages:
    13,529
    Likes Received:
    267
    Location:
    Vancouver, BC
    ^ Hi, can you help me with my problem... I'm totally addicted to badminton that I get withdrawal symptoms if after a few days I don't get to hit a bird or hear the sharp crack sound of a bird being crisply hit. :p :D
     
    #157 visor, Jan 3, 2013
    Last edited: Jan 3, 2013
  18. StefanDO

    StefanDO Regular Member

    Joined:
    Apr 17, 2012
    Messages:
    72
    Likes Received:
    0
    Occupation:
    PhD student (Neuropsychology)
    Location:
    Dortmund, Germany
    Haha - funny, the same is happening to me these days! :-D No badminton at university between Dec. 22nd and Jan 7th - so what did I do? I tried to use the time for "badminton research", like threads here on BC or other sites. :) That's also how I happened to reply to this thread. ;-)

    Apart from that, if you want my professional advice, in order not to get withdrawal symptoms... PLAY BADMINTON! :-D Contrary to many other drugs, it's healthy. ;-)
     
  19. gunner93

    gunner93 Regular Member

    Joined:
    Aug 12, 2012
    Messages:
    57
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    MY
    Hi StefanDO,

    My 9 YO when playing against better opponents in competitions, he thow his set away deliberately as if to end the match immediately. It starts when he tries his best but still cant get points (including diving etc). He starts to get anxious then desperate and after a series of unforced errors, he just broke down and deliberately hit out or hit the net to end the game. How do I repair this?
     
  20. Loh

    Loh Regular Member

    Joined:
    Oct 9, 2002
    Messages:
    14,797
    Likes Received:
    332
    Occupation:
    Stock Broker
    Location:
    Singapore Also Can
    Lee Chong Wei is a fantastic role model for your son and other badminton players. He did not win every game and in fact was knocked out in the early rounds when he first started to play internationally. Even at his peak he lost occasionally to lesser players during tournaments when his form took a hit.

    So if WR1 LCW can fail but succeeded through hard work and persistence throughout his career, one must not give up but to try harder.

    The case of Saina Nehwal against the Great Wall of China, is another interesting example. Hitherto, very few players can match up to the skills of the Chinese singles ladies, but SN has demonstrated that she is able to do so against all of them on a more consistent basis. It is the positive mental attitude of SN that she can conquer if she puts her mind and hard work to it.

    With such examples, maybe your son could be persuaded to train harder and try to win as many points against better players and not be so disappointed at not winning the match. Keep on trying and remain focus at getting a point instead of throwing the points away. One point at a time, so they say. And one day he could achieve his goal of beating his opponents.
     
    #160 Loh, Jan 3, 2013
    Last edited: Jan 3, 2013

Share This Page