Thanks for visiting us!

Badminton Central is a free community for fans of badminton! If you find anything useful here please consider registering to see more content and get involved with our great community users, it takes less than 15 seconds! Everybody is welcome here.

Click here for a FREE account!

squash vs badminton

Discussion in 'General Forum' started by kmodak, Jun 15, 2006.

  1. bendi36

    bendi36 Regular Member

    Joined:
    Dec 11, 2006
    Messages:
    5
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Australia
    yeh squash is more explosive movements but less twisting more turning... definitely u hav to be stronger and fitter to play squash at an elite level than badminton... look at the heart rate difference squash is in the 90's and badminton is in the 80%'s... they've done the tests for alot of sports at the elite and badminton didnt even scratch the top ten while squash ranked one. games go longer in squash and u cant judge the difference on two photos... before u go off u should no im a badminton player and only social squash player
     
  2. ViningWolff

    ViningWolff Regular Member

    Joined:
    Nov 2, 2004
    Messages:
    847
    Likes Received:
    0
    Occupation:
    Process Engineer
    Location:
    Strathmore Alberta
    Squash at Number one?

    Gotta call BS on that.

    And games are NOT longer in squash. The new nines and 11 rally point system make games bloody short. In one hour me and the guys I play (we're at the same level) can get seven to eight games done on the nine point non rally point system IN AN HOUR.

    Last time I played badminton, I got four games done in just over and hour and that was the rally 21 system.

    Having played both, you'll never convince me squash is harder. Lower level players tend to run much more than higher level. As I got better in squash I noticed that it is far more about shot making than all out running.

    The hardest/most taxing game in sport today - Sevens Rugby. I've done triathalons and cross country running. Nothing is as physically draining as sevens.

    Next to that would be olympic style wrestling, but then most badminton players likely haven't dabbled in that type of sport.
     
  3. bendi36

    bendi36 Regular Member

    Joined:
    Dec 11, 2006
    Messages:
    5
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Australia
    well apparantly its the healthies sport as well and badmintons not there either http://www.squashplayer.co.uk/sp_latest/forbes_survey.htm ... squash matches are much longer cos the rallies go longer then badminton rallies... u obviously arent a very good player if ur rallies consist of only ten shots before someone hits a winner. THe top players keep retrieving even when out of position similiar to badminton but they are fitter cos theres more court to cover
     
  4. bendi36

    bendi36 Regular Member

    Joined:
    Dec 11, 2006
    Messages:
    5
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Australia
    well squash is faster to... john white has hit the fastest ball in history faster than any shuttle
     
  5. Gollum

    Gollum Regular Member

    Joined:
    May 23, 2003
    Messages:
    4,360
    Likes Received:
    39
    Location:
    Surrey, UK
    What a ridiculous discussion :rolleyes:

    Comparing the fitness demands of different sports is fraught with problems. Typically, people will simply argue in favour of their favourite sport.

    Objective comparisons are difficult to make due to the different demands of the sport. One sport may require greater cardiovascular endurace, whereas another may require greater speed or strength. Different sports require different types of movement (for example, jumping is common in badminton, but not in squash).

    It should be sufficient to recognise that both squash and badminton, if played at a high level, put extraordinary demands on players' fitness. Top squash players and top badminton players are, without doubt, truly world-class athletes.
     
  6. Neil Nicholls

    Neil Nicholls Regular Member

    Joined:
    Aug 21, 2002
    Messages:
    2,908
    Likes Received:
    7
    Location:
    Cannock, UK
    How fast was that then?
     
  7. FEND.

    FEND. Regular Member

    Joined:
    May 14, 2004
    Messages:
    2,784
    Likes Received:
    2
    Occupation:
    Full Time Badmintoncentral.com/forums camper. Part
    Location:
    Perth, Australia
    Isn't this the case of 'fanboyism' or something like that?

    Camp A : "X box 360 >>> Nintendo Wii"
    Camp B : "Nintendo Wii >>> X box 360"

    Etcetera Etcetera Etcetera....

    And so this thread has evolved to that.

    P.S I think I spelt Etcetera wrongly..
     
  8. Quasimodo

    Quasimodo Regular Member

    Joined:
    Oct 28, 2004
    Messages:
    732
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Bell tower
  9. ViningWolff

    ViningWolff Regular Member

    Joined:
    Nov 2, 2004
    Messages:
    847
    Likes Received:
    0
    Occupation:
    Process Engineer
    Location:
    Strathmore Alberta
    White is considered one of the hardest hitters on tour these days, though that's only around 275 km/h. ( I thought with the way he hits it would be around the 190 MPH range)

    That puts is slightly below some of Lin Dan's/Chen Hong best smashes and well below the doubles guys.
     
  10. toddster

    toddster Regular Member

    Joined:
    Nov 7, 2002
    Messages:
    112
    Likes Received:
    0
    Occupation:
    Grad. Student PE instructor
    Location:
    Southern California
    It is a different game that deserves respect on its own. I have had freinds try and argue badminton vs. some other sport, and it is really hard to do. I studied Kinesiology for a while, and the "standard" agility tests will not pick up a significant difference between squash and badmiton athletes.

    The only test that can be inferred to inorder to determine which atheltes are "better" athletes would be that of a cardiovasicular VO2 max test. I doubt you will find any significant differences between elite badminton and squash athletes.

    If you give respect, you MAY get it back in return. If you dis-respect, you WILL get dis-respected in return. It is like compairing apples and oranges, they are both fruit, but they are different.

    Good Luck,
    Toddster
     
  11. cooler

    cooler Regular Member

    Joined:
    Apr 25, 2002
    Messages:
    22,050
    Likes Received:
    13
    Occupation:
    Surfing, reading fan mails:D, Dilithium Crystal hu
    Location:
    Basement Boiler Room
    u forgot about the plastic smashers :p
     
  12. Tianjin

    Tianjin Regular Member

    Joined:
    Oct 13, 2006
    Messages:
    126
    Likes Received:
    0
    Occupation:
    Student
    Location:
    Canada
    I heard the best performance on a cardiovasicular VO2 max test is held by a cross-country skier...
     
  13. cooler

    cooler Regular Member

    Joined:
    Apr 25, 2002
    Messages:
    22,050
    Likes Received:
    13
    Occupation:
    Surfing, reading fan mails:D, Dilithium Crystal hu
    Location:
    Basement Boiler Room
    one should include mental challenges too. If not, shoveling wet snow is up there too in term of Vo2 demand.
     
  14. Neil Nicholls

    Neil Nicholls Regular Member

    Joined:
    Aug 21, 2002
    Messages:
    2,908
    Likes Received:
    7
    Location:
    Cannock, UK
    For what it's worth (my bold)

    In sports where endurance is an important component in performance, such as cycling, rowing, cross-country skiing and running, world class athletes typically have high VO2 maximums. World class male athletes, cyclists and cross-country skiers typically exceed 80 ml/kg/min and a rare few may exceed 90 ml/kg/min for men and 70 ml/kg/min for women. Three times Tour de France winner Greg LeMond is reported to have had a VO2 max of 92.5 at his peak - one of the highest ever recorded, while fellow cyclist Miguel Indurain and cross-country skier Bjørn Dæhlie both measured at an astounding 96 ml/kg/min. It should also be noted that Daehlie's result was achieved out of season and that physiologist Erlend Hem who was responsible for the testing stated that he would not discount the possibility of the skier passing 100 ml/kg/min at his absolute peak. By comparison a competitive club athlete might achieve a VO2 max of around 70 ml/kg/min. World class rowers are physically very large endurance athletes and typically do not score as high on a per weight basis, but often score exceptionally high in absolute terms.


    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/VO2_max
     
  15. stumblingfeet

    stumblingfeet Regular Member

    Joined:
    Jun 16, 2004
    Messages:
    1,121
    Likes Received:
    9
    Location:
    Ottawa
    I thought that V02max was already normalized by comparing the oxygen use in milliliters to kilograms body mass?

    The reason that you can't really compare V02max in athletes in different sports is because sports involving more muscle groups working aerobically will naturally use more oxygen. For example, a long distance runner or cyclist uses their arms at a much lower percentage of their local aerobic ability than a cross-country skier, while the legs in all of those athletes are taxed to the max aerobic ability - so the difference in V02max is obvious.

    A lot of the info on V02max also happens to be based on continuous movement endurance sports. For stop and go sports like badminton and squash, it is much harder to quantify the energy systems needs because many movements are anaerobic, with the aerobic system acting as more of a supportive energy system.

    Note that in the article by Omosegaard about PEHL's physical training tests, his V02max went down between 1988 and 1992. The reason? He previously spent too much time focusing on this ability and his overall playing ability was improved by redistributing his training to other areas.
     
  16. twobeer

    twobeer Regular Member

    Joined:
    Dec 5, 2003
    Messages:
    4,000
    Likes Received:
    11
    Occupation:
    computer
    Location:
    Sweden
    My assumption is that badminton puts far more anaerobic demands, due to the explosive jumps, launches etc, on the player compared to squash (which possably put a greater aerobic demand, due to the longer rallies).

    Hence my belief that its "harder" to excel in badminton as you have to optimize both for anaerobic and aerobic excercise, in squash I think you can focus more on the aerobic training, and less on the anaerobic parts.

    /T
     
  17. cooler

    cooler Regular Member

    Joined:
    Apr 25, 2002
    Messages:
    22,050
    Likes Received:
    13
    Occupation:
    Surfing, reading fan mails:D, Dilithium Crystal hu
    Location:
    Basement Boiler Room
    i dunno all the squash type shoes but if u want proof which sports are more demanding, look the 2 links in this thread. LOL
    http://www.badmintoncentral.com/forums/showthread.php?p=489095&posted=1#post489095
     
  18. nisse

    nisse New Member

    Joined:
    Apr 5, 2012
    Messages:
    1
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    EU
    Very interesting discussion. One can play both sports at a very intense level and during the longest rallies you can reach your maximum heart rate. In general, squash rallies tend to last longer (as per studies done on racquet game rally lengths). Here some interesting information regarding different racquet games and about their intensity:
    http://www.researchgate.net/publica...ison_of_heart_rate_responses_in_racquet_games

    My personal observations come from using heart rate monitor for 4 years now while playing and excercising, also during competitive squash and badminton games. I play both squash and badminton pretty much at the same level when comparing my own skill level and those of my opponents (approx. national level B). Throughout the those years, with squash I tend to regularly go above 1000 calories burned over an hour whereas badminton burns ca. 800 calories. However, with very intensive game of badminton I have reached up +1k calories burned and hear rate peaking at maximum (202bpm, just if you are interested comparing the calories, my weight is between 82-84kg).

    This is just to give some idea how my body reacts to these amazing and entertaining racquet games. In the end, what makes the one or the other "tougher" really boils down to your own skill level in the game. Badminton is easier to start with but once you develop your game, squash enables you to withhold longer rallies.

    These are just my few pennies for the topic.
     
  19. Tadashi

    Tadashi Regular Member

    Joined:
    Feb 10, 2012
    Messages:
    162
    Likes Received:
    0
    Occupation:
    AE278BB6CBB7487C0FF7AE706177CDE2E45AC583 is my dig
    Location:
    Germany
    This table is from Liverpool John Moores University's scientist MacLaren (1998: p. 43):

    Kilojoule per minute estimate


    LO HI -- the racket sport
    ==================
    29 46 -- badminton
    29 42 -- table tennis
    29 46 -- tennis
    42 76 -- squash
     
    #59 Tadashi, Apr 5, 2012
    Last edited: Apr 5, 2012
  20. thumpsky

    thumpsky Regular Member

    Joined:
    Jul 18, 2011
    Messages:
    377
    Likes Received:
    0
    Occupation:
    Student
    Location:
    Vancouver
    what stops your squash opponent from hitting the ball and making it bounce directly back at them and not getting out of your way to retrieve it? seems like an easy thing to exploit.
     

Share This Page