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Stances when defending smashes in doubles.

Discussion in 'Techniques / Training' started by Crimz, Jan 9, 2010.

  1. Crimz

    Crimz Regular Member

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    When defending smashes in singles, I stand with my racket foot out and it is simple and easy. But for doubles my coach teaches me to stand with my non-racket leg out and just a thumb backhand grip all the way. When the opponent smashes im supposed to move in with my racket leg and just block the shuttle. Seems rather easy in training but during a real match I somehow revert back to my normal way and stand with my racket leg out. This is quite good as I'm able to drive back smashes but the weakness of this is the opponent doing cross court smashes into my forehand. How do you guys stand?
     
  2. weiping

    weiping Regular Member

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    never stay in one grip, u might need your forehand to defend as will
     
  3. wannaliquorbox

    wannaliquorbox Regular Member

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    body weight should be on non racket foot, so it acts as a pivot for your defensive blocks and drives.

    this way you can also use your nonracket foot to push off forward/backward in case the opponent fast drops or punch clear.
     
  4. canti

    canti Regular Member

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    to hit a smash i have 2 ways. 1 is to regularly block with my feet parallel with my racket at my side for forehand or back hand block. The other is to attack the smash by running at it and getting under it to drive it back or even drop it.
     
  5. Yoppy

    Yoppy Regular Member

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    I also have my right foot a bit on the front (Im a right handed). At the moment I dont have problem with returning smash using thumb grip and backhand stroke, but I found it a bit of problem when the smash directed to my forehand area and therefore what i did so far is to stand a little bit to the right when defending smashes.

    But yeah I think I will try to have my left foot a bit to the front and see if thats better.
     
  6. Trmun

    Trmun Regular Member

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    They way you guys describe how you are picking smashes, one good smash in your forehand seems like it would give you immense trouble :eek: but I'm probably not picturing your stances probably from your descriptions.

    Personally I'm standing with both feets parallel and the racket in a front of me, so that it is pointing towards the net, grip being something inbetween the forehand and backhand grip (thumb on one of the sides) so that I can change between the two fast depending on where the smash is.
     
  7. Crimz

    Crimz Regular Member

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    i personally feel that standing with the racket foot out would give you the forehand or backhand advantage if you would want to attack the smash. However for full defense I think maybe the non-racket foot would be better. Havent really tried this out properly yet in a game though. =(
     
  8. DivingBirdie

    DivingBirdie Regular Member

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    both feet parallel is definitely the best when you're defending from your base position...:p
     
  9. Crimz

    Crimz Regular Member

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    parallel? As in square position with neither foot infront of the other?
     
  10. Yoppy

    Yoppy Regular Member

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    After a brief trial with left foot a bit on the front, here's what i find:
    1. clearly my back hand smash return and backhand attacking drive when returning smash is not as good as when i normally stand with my right foot to the front
    2. forehand smash return is easier
    3. overall coverage area is a lot less

    on parallel position: its a very nice position covering both side area, but lacking in foward (receiving drop shot) and back movement.

    Conclusion, I will stick with my right foot a bit to the front or on a parallel position. This position gives me a lot space coverage. Using backhand to return smash is the way to go for me.
     
  11. venkatesh

    venkatesh Regular Member

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    As I've noticed with the top double players, their feet are usually parallel, with their body facing the smasher. That means they're not parallel to the net. Thus, sometimes, their right foot is more forward, and sometimes, their left foot is more forward. It depends on where the shot is coming from. Their knees are also bent and their weight is slightly leaning forward.

    Try observing videos from them. They're synchronized in changing their stance.

    As with the grip, I think the best way to hold your racket is with a bevel grip. This way, you can switch easily to backhand and forehand. Try also not to be committed with only one side. This is what Gil Clark usually observes. Although with a backhand is the best way to defend, staying committed on the backhand side will make it awkaward for you to hit shots directed towards your right. Your racket head should be facing away from you.
     
  12. Trmun

    Trmun Regular Member

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    Yes, if anything the racketfoot can be 5 cm in front of the other.

    Regarding the positions weakness in getting to the net, it is no different than any other time you want to go to the net - only difference is that you might be standing a bit further back, but hey - grow a bigger quadriceps :p

    The reason for standing with parallel feet is that it gives you the biggest covering area. If you at the same time place you racket with a bevel grip pointing towards the net, so that when you look down at it, you can't see the strings, you won't be comitted to either forehand or backhand before you can see where that shuttle is headed.
     
  13. Yoppy

    Yoppy Regular Member

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    I wish i can grow quadriceps that quick. For those who cant, will find it acceleration to the net is faster with one leg on the front. So i find it a more convinience solution for me :)

    As for the grip, why bavel grip when you know that the backhand can cover 80% or more of the area to return smash. I just pick a random short video from youtube, why dont you guys check it out:

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iYyJ_vPDAcI

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RZ2k-tsX5KE&feature=fvw

    It runs for 3 and a half minutes and you may surprise how many of the smash were returned by forehand stroke. On my count it was not more than 5, and the rest were return by backhand stroke

    Also notice that the leg are rarely parallel, depending on where the bird is they move one or the other foward.
     
  14. Trmun

    Trmun Regular Member

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    The reason behind the grip is that any good player will notice if you continually just use your backhand and he'll then place the shuttle in a position where you can't take it with a backhand. This way you might still be taking it 80% of the time with your backhand, but you are still ready for that forehand.

    Regarding the footwork - the feet of the direct reciever are parallel, at least in the second link (was the only one I looked through). The cross-reciever has obviously turned a bit so that he faces the smasher more than the net, which is pretty common - just like he has pulled a bit into the middle of the court so that he covers more of the middle.

    I was merely talking about the situation where you are the direct reciever which I believe is the situation described by the OP.
     
  15. Yoppy

    Yoppy Regular Member

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    Im not saying that i will use my backhand all the time to return smash. But in comparison, I would not sacrifice/trade the time to change from thumb grip to forehand grip with anything alse. If I have to use bavel grip that means i have to change grip all the time, right? (either to thumb grip or forehand grip)

    In real time situation, I would have to change grip for only 20% of the time. Compare that with bavel grip, 100%.
     
  16. Trmun

    Trmun Regular Member

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    Difference being, you won't have time to change to the forehand grip from the backhand grip. So when you have to let every 5th smash go into the ground (or pick it up so late that you'll get molested on the next) I will return it.
     
  17. Yoppy

    Yoppy Regular Member

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    Isn't that (the 20% rating) your rate that you will not be able to return your opponent's smash anyway?? :) Ofcourse depending on what level you are up againts :)
     
  18. Yoppy

    Yoppy Regular Member

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    Sorry for the off topic guys, grip issue should be discuss in another thread.
    To answer Crimz, I have nothing againts parallel footwork at all. I think its very balance and easy to use.

    As for using non-racket feet foward, its simply just not for me. This adds too much important on forehand return, whereas most of smash return will be done with backhand. So stand on parallel or your racket feet 5-10cm on the front.
     
  19. Crimz

    Crimz Regular Member

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    Guys I assume that when u say you are able to retrieve the shuttle, u are able to return the shuttle properly pass the net? Cause thats also very important too, no point returning the shuttle pass the net when the opponent can just kill it. I still prefer standing with my racket leg out but i think maybe different situation calls for different stances hahaha!
     
  20. Yoppy

    Yoppy Regular Member

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    Yes the bird should go high or net play or attacking drive
     

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