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String Tension

Discussion in 'Badminton String' started by virusvoodoo, May 1, 2004.

  1. virusvoodoo

    virusvoodoo Regular Member

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    Hi,
    I have a question regarding the string tension. When I go to string my racquet, is it better to have 24lbs cross x 24lbs main OR 25lbs cross x 23lbs main?
     
  2. bluejeff

    bluejeff Regular Member

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    You can search the tension threads out there; also, there is a tension thread on the top.
     
  3. taneepak

    taneepak Regular Member

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    The latter, 23 lbs main with 25 lbs cross, is ideal. The reason is that a racquet strung with an additional 2 lbs on the cross (roughly 10%) will maintain the shape of your racquet to almost the same shape in it's unstrung state. The 24 lbs x 24 lbs will stress your racquet, as there is a greater net force compressing the head and throat than the side to side part of the racquet. Although Yonex says this guideline applies to their newer racquets, I think it applies to all racquets unless the manufacturer specifically says otherwise.
     
  4. BoboTheBadder

    BoboTheBadder Regular Member

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    I thought tensions for main x cross were dependent on the stringing machine used and the support it has for the frame? At least that's what LazyBuddy told me :D
     
  5. virusvoodoo

    virusvoodoo Regular Member

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    Thanks for your help. You certain have answered my question. I have another question though. To have different tensions for main and cross is it possible to string it using 1 piece or in 2 pieces?
     
  6. taneepak

    taneepak Regular Member

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    Using 2 pieces is better. Although one piece can be used, the 10% tension difference will diminish over time, to the detriment of keeping your racquet in shape without any stress. But, one piece stringing is perfectly okay for top players who restring their racquets every week or for every tournament, where the time between each restring is too short for any tension creep, because they are sponsored by racquet manufacturers.
     
  7. LazyBuddy

    LazyBuddy Regular Member

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    Yes, I did, and I still believe so. :p
     
  8. Pete LSD

    Pete LSD Regular Member

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    I second LB! :) Generally speaking, machines with side supports allow one to deviate from the Main+2 lbs for cross convention.

     
  9. Brave_Turtle

    Brave_Turtle Regular Member

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    So, machine with side support you dont need to add +2 lbs? I'm not really fast :(
     
  10. taneepak

    taneepak Regular Member

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    The type of support, whether side or top and bottom, 2 point, 6 point, 10 supports, etc. a stringing machine has nothing to do with the 10% difference in cross over main tensioning. Yonex has indicated that the 10% difference is necessary to retain your racquet shape over time.
    Stringing machines with side supports, all things being equal, can string to much higher tension than machines without side supports. If you have a 2-point stringing machine, you wouldn't want to mess around with 30 plus lbs. However, if you have a 6-point, 12 supports (with 8 V-shaped side supports) machine, you can easily string at 30 plus lbs tension.
    The main/cross tension difference as advised by Yonex is not stringing machine-dependent, as it would be when tensioning at higher tensions.
     
  11. LazyBuddy

    LazyBuddy Regular Member

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    1. I believe in some old threads, ppl brought up cases like main=cross, main > cross, etc. I think one case is like a pro stringer strung pro's (KDM?) racket with combo of main(36) vs cross (28). I think all these combos are done with special modified machines, and therefore, the machine DOES count.

    2. Yonex standard is known to be weired sometimes. i.e. many their rackets stated tension range from 14 to no more than 22lb. I wonder how many of us really followed the "regulation".

    3. I think such rating/advice is based on their own market strategy, survey from a small group of testers and their own machine/equipment configuration. It's obvious, why yonex bother to study all kinda string machine in the world, to give out 20+ different solutions out? Plus, 1 "safe" strategy is always better than 10 copies of complicated methods, which will mis-lead the general public (newbie stringers got confused, and blame yonex's guide for wrong infromation)
     
  12. LazyBuddy

    LazyBuddy Regular Member

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    There's no sure answer.

    Many pro stringers modify their machine for their own needs, and hopefully they know what they are doing. ;)

    If u have ur own machine, read the user guide, and it should be clearly stated. If not, pick up the phone, call the service desk.
     
  13. taneepak

    taneepak Regular Member

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    I think a racquet manufacturer is more qualified to specify main/cross tension ranges for his racquets than a stringing machine manufacturer. Never have I heard a stringing machine manufacturer specifying the tension value differences between the main and cross strings of badminton racquets, as that would be none of his business.
    The 10% higher cross over main tension is a Yonex standard for badminton racquets. If you are interested I can reproduce an email from Yonex Japan that says so, and in writing. It would be interesting to know the authority of the sources that say different stringing machines dictate different main/cross tension ratios. I seriously doubt stringing machine manufacturers would dare make such a preposterous claim.
    However, if you are claiming so called stringing masters have their own main/cross tension ratios, then that is another matter, because such masters do not have any corporate responsibility or risk any legal liability for misleading claims.
     
  14. LazyBuddy

    LazyBuddy Regular Member

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    The racket manufacture specifies the range of tension for main and cross, but not necessary the difference/ratio.

    Of course, most ppl follow the 10% difference from yonex, but does not mean yonex developed the standard. How we know it's not the other way around? As yonex got the experience and study from stringer / string machine features, then draw the conclusion?

    Personally, I use 2-point drop weight machine, and I always have the 10% difference. However, I do know some other stringers using 6 point support machine, without adding the 10% on cross. Both our jobs are well done.
     
  15. bluejeff

    bluejeff Regular Member

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    I will have to add some more comments to this thread :)

    In Taiwan, there are lots of people believeing in the Main(vertical strings) should have greater tension than Cross(Horizontal strings).

    For example, we string at 20x22 here, but in taiwan, they do it reversely to 22x20.

    Why? Because people in Taiwan think that, since the distance of the main strings are longer and cross is shorter, therefore, you must use higher tension at the main in order to "catch up" the tension at the cross. (I am talking about the two piece strings here, not one piece.)

    Personally, I don't get it and I am not a believer to that. I still string cross higher than main. However, I have seen people (my friends) with 22x20 racquets strings and I compared it to mine racquet (both are MP99), and they look the same!! :eek:

    I am just not sure how stringers in Taiwan can manage to reverse the tension pattern without changing the shape of the racquet.......wow....
     
  16. LazyBuddy

    LazyBuddy Regular Member

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    That's what I thought before and heard before: modify the machine to fit for ur own usage. ;)
     
  17. taneepak

    taneepak Regular Member

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    Well, you can try to visualize how a racquet will look if strung with a certain tension on the mains only and then the same type of racquet if strung with the same tension on the crosses only. Which will deform more? The mains only will deform more than the crosses only. I am sure you know why.
    Maybe some of you are engineers who have designed long span bridges and who can provide some input on this.
     
  18. Pete LSD

    Pete LSD Regular Member

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    This topic has been extensively talked about under the proportional stringing thread. As Cooler indicated the 10% extra on the cross is a poor man's way of bringing the cross back into its original shape.

     
  19. Pete LSD

    Pete LSD Regular Member

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    The amount of support from a six-point machine allows one to safely string the cross less than the main under very high-tension, e.g., 30 + lbs.

    What you are talking about is string bed stiffness as it is measured in lbs or kg per unit distance.

     
  20. cooler

    cooler Regular Member

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    You are placing too much reliance on engineer and scientifist.There are many task and craft that have been mastered by non-engineer and non-scientist. Having science background helps but it is experience and desire to excel to be the best make a person a master or an expert. I can give a racket to a civil engineer with PhD and he wouldn't know start on stringing a racket. On the other extreme, if I give a racket to a civil engineer with structual design experience, he/she will laugh at the 20x22 rule from yonex because it is too simplistic and identify the unbalanced stress points.

    I know a mechanical engineer who knows next to nothing on basic auto mechanic and yet a high school drop out who pump gas would know more auto mechanic than this mechanical engineer.
     
    #20 cooler, May 4, 2004
    Last edited: May 4, 2004

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