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stringing a massively cracked frame????

Discussion in 'Badminton Stringing Techniques & Tools' started by noppy, Nov 30, 2008.

  1. noppy

    noppy Regular Member

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    hi,
    just cus im bored this weekend i got one of my old broken racket and decided i would 'mend' it hahahahah anyways i got some epoxy glue and and bodged a loads of it around the break, the break is a full on two halves anyways its pretty much set now.

    btw im not planning on playing with it for proper badminton but i thought it would be ok for the family to use on the out door court in the garden.

    so my question is....
    would stringing at a higher or lower tension ie 18lbs or 28lbs. because i was thinking at 18lbs there is less pressure on the frame but that means if a shuttle hits strings right next to the break or on the break there would be less tension to hold it together, though at 28lbs i thought there would be more tension to hold it together but possibly too much and it would brwak itself before hitting a shuttle????? the racket im playing with was guaranteed to 31lbs before it was killed.

    any ideas.... dont be rude either (please) im just having a bit of fun.
     
  2. kwun

    kwun Administrator

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    low tension.

    the higher tension won't help holding the racket together. it will help crumpling the racket in. i had a racket that went through a clash. there was signs of paint chip and slight damage. i went and had it strung at medium tension, it caved in after less than half a game.

    now it sits on top of the fridge serving its retirement as a fly squatter. a Cab20 JP fly squatter. ;)

    if you string yours at 18lbs, you might still be able to have it retain its shape.
     
  3. noppy

    noppy Regular Member

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    cheers i will string it at 18lbs :) see how it goes

    nice fly squatter btw, i use my old broken sotx charm a-171 (dw no ones heard of it hahah) they work so well
     
  4. jhirata

    jhirata Regular Member

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    Kwun's right with that, use low tension.

    18lbs would still be considered 'high-tension' for playing around in the backyard ;)..
    Those normal steel conventional racquets for playing in the backyard are probably hand-strung to around 14~16lbs.
     
  5. Danstevens

    Danstevens Regular Member

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    LOL

    That's an awesome flyswatter, Kwun.

    Again, my advice would be to string it at a low tension (16-18 lbs) if you have to string it at all. Chances are, even at 16 lbs, it wouldn't be that durable.
     

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