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Stringing Question

Discussion in 'Badminton String' started by JChen99, Oct 7, 2002.

  1. JChen99

    JChen99 Regular Member

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    I recently got my MP55 restrung with BG 65-ti (gonna try its durability one more time) cuz the old string (BG85) was frailing after about 20-30 hours of harsh play time.

    When I got the racket back from the stringer (no names mentioned) I notice that the cross strings are not straight, but curved. After I get the racket bak from him I usually straighten out the strings myself, but in the process lose about half a pound(or mabe more) of tension.

    I suggested that he prestrung the strings loosely before pulling it tight so it'll make it straight without me having to straighten it and lose tension, but he said that if he did that the racket would lose it's kick?

    I know his "business" is quite big and it mite be due to that fact he's not taking that extra time to do so. I was wondering if this is bad practice or is it really the fact that stringers do string the cross crooked/curved. However, I remember him telling me to straighten the string later myself... so my first thought after hearing that was "wtf???" but then again he's the pro... and what do i kno? :confused: :confused:

    hope someone can answer my question... thx
     
  2. badrad

    badrad Regular Member

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    get a new stringer....

    it is possible he is pulling every second cross string. after weaving, there is a tendency to curve, but you can quickly straighten it very easily. tensioning will further straighten it.

    usually at the completion, crosses are not entirely straight, but should be relatively close. usually if he has done a rush job, or doing it in short time, these are short cut items he eliminates. a professional will complete the job by ensuring all the line appears straight. appearance is everything...
     
  3. timeless

    timeless Regular Member

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    I've got a stringing question. I don't know what the correct term for it is but is there a difference when a stringer completes the job with 2 knots as opposed to more? ie. a single length of string is used for both cross and mains as opposed to stringers who do the job with several strings resulting in 4+ knots?
     
  4. badrad

    badrad Regular Member

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    only 2 knots or 4 knots. any more, get yourself another stringer...:D

    a 2 knot job is accomplished with a single string used for both mains and cross. a bit more efficient use of string, but sometimes harder to keep separate tensions between the cross and the mains (although this matter has been debated). a 4 knot job meant there are two strings, one for the main, and the other for the cross. so you do the math. more knots... where are the friggin strings coming from? hahahahah - snapped string, poor bastad...
     
  5. LazyBuddy

    LazyBuddy Regular Member

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    I've been experiencing this kinda problem, too. Some cross ones (most near the T-joint) are appear to be curved. Ppl told me that the stringer should do a "final pull" (or something like that) to make it looks better. At first, I was worried about whether the string will get loose (lose tension) or get broken easily, but after several weeks of hard play, it seems ok.

    I've also noticed that even though some other ppl's racket seems "perfectly stringed" at the beginning, but after a period of time (usually 2, 3+ months), some portions of the string will be curved like mine.

    Most of us just don't care too much about it now... hehehehhe... :p
     
  6. timeless

    timeless Regular Member

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    Which do you think is better: 2 or 4? Sounds like a single length would be better for unified tension across both cross and mains while 2 lengths could be better for different tensions for cross and mains?
     
  7. badrad

    badrad Regular Member

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    i can never do the perfect string job for my wife, no matter what i do. she hates my stringing, and i hate her as a customer. so all my string jobs are now done by my daughter. actually i have her working this very moment on a couple racquets. she does a great job. but i still string my own, because i like it done my way...

    as for 2 or 4, i have been doing 4 knots for so long, it's just habit. i had used 2 knots at the beginning, but i did not like the original pattern i was using. i later experimented with different stringing patterns, but sometimes that was too much thinking (my brain hurts) so i slowly resolved to 4 knots.
     
  8. JChen99

    JChen99 Regular Member

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    Re: Re: Stringing Question

    well the reason that strings start curving after a long time of play is cuz the string is simply losing its tension

    When i get the racket bak... it's not jus the string near the T joint... but EVERYWHERE!! u can line a paper up to s cross string (at the ends of the racket) and see the string disappear under the paper cuz it's so badly curved!!! -.-"
     
  9. JChen99

    JChen99 Regular Member

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    doesn't yonex or BK or Gosen distribute stringing patterns??
     
  10. timeless

    timeless Regular Member

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    *LOL* Okay how much does C. (your daughter) charge? :D

    So I guess it doesn't matter as long as it's 2 / 4 knots... a matter of preference and satisfaction with the overall stringing job. :)
     
  11. badrad

    badrad Regular Member

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    daughter just finished one racquet. lines are straight... tensioned at 23lbs cross and mains.
     
  12. Winex West Can

    Winex West Can Regular Member

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    Heheh...I think badrad takes a cut from C. for each stringing job she does.

    Timeless, wrt to 2 vs 4 knots, the one-piece stringing requires that the cross strings be start from the T up to the top (weak part of the frame). With two-piece, you can start the cross from the top and work down to the T (strongest part of the frame).

    Having said that, some folks have claimed that there are patterns/techniques used for 1-piece where you start the cross from the top/middle down, etc.

    Regarding JChen's original post, if your stringer is too lazy to straighten those cross strings, you got to wonder what other areas s/he was lazy in (maybe tensioning three/four strings at a time, not checking for cracks, broken grommets, etc.)
     
  13. JChen99

    JChen99 Regular Member

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    got a way to easily figure that out... but it's really evil... and i dont suggest anyone do it unless u r absolutely evil as hell and wanna make a fool outta the stringer...

    my way is: giv him a slightly cracked racket to string... but this is just absolutely evil...

    y is it evil?? think!
     
  14. timeless

    timeless Regular Member

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    How important is it to replace broken grommets? It seems on my racquets the string has dug right into/through all the grommets.
     
  15. JChen99

    JChen99 Regular Member

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    strings will snap if grommets are not there... cuz grommets keep string from rubbing against the corners of the hole...
     
  16. jwu

    jwu Regular Member

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    After a string job the crosses are never straight but it just takes a little more effort to straighten it out so if your stringer is not doing that, find another one coz like winex said, you never know what other steps are missing.

    The 2 knots (1 string) method is the traditional way of stringing so I was told, more string efficient. The 4 knots (2 strings) method is better for iso-shape racquets such as yonex's mp series and iso series because starting the cross from the top prevents the head from warping where as if you start from the bottom, you will twist the iso head into an oval head. Using the 4 knots method is also easier since you won't have to string half of your main with a 8m long string but rather 2-3m, kinda annoying to thread that thing across.

    As for grommets, replace them when they break, or else you will be seeing your stringers a lot more often than you like.
     
  17. badrad

    badrad Regular Member

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    i wish....

    i lose money every time she strings. not only does she forget to pay me for the spool of string that i bought, if i give change to the client, she forgets to pay me back that difference as well! then on top of that, i drive to pick and drop off the racquet. on top that even more... i have to feed the damn stringer!!!

    so don't get me started!!!!:p

    grommet replacement is important. grommet life can be extended by rotating the grommet. you have to be careful when doing so to make sure the grommet is one sided, turning it exactly 90 degrees. sometime is the grommet is not rotated enough, pressure from the pulled string can actually spin the grommet back into the orginal position. another way to extend grommet life is tubing. but the best is remove and replace, but that takes a bit of effort and time from a stringers standpoint, and if the stringer is working assembly line style with lots of jobs waiting, grommet replacement sometimes is at the bottom of the list. but, having a real grommet removal tool does make the task very easy, but expensive piece of gear.
     
  18. timeless

    timeless Regular Member

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    Here are some more stringing questions :)

    1. Are there manuals online or something that displays/explains stringing techniques?

    2. When using the "correct" techniques do the knots always end up in the same place? It seems every stringer I've ever had puts the knots in different places.

    3. Are there different techniques for isometric racquets than classic oval racquets? And does using a stringing technique for oval racquets damage isometric racquets?

    Thanks in advance! :D
     
  19. jwu

    jwu Regular Member

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    Hey timeless, just read all the post before. Badrad gave 2 sites that are great for stringing techniques. As for the knots, they are in different place because there are different string patterns for different racquets. As for oval and iso racquets, just read my post 2-3 post before yours.
     
  20. timeless

    timeless Regular Member

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    He did? Hmmm I just took a look at all the posts for this thread and I can't find any URLs. Am I just blind? :cool:

    I just read your post, I missed it before, thanks for the info :).
     

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