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Teaching Badminton

Discussion in 'Coaching Forum' started by wedgewenis, Jul 28, 2002.

  1. wedgewenis

    wedgewenis Regular Member

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    i've been teaching tennis for a few years now at the begginner-intermediate level

    the funny thing is that i would much prefer to teach badminton and i feel i know more about badminton than tennis ..but i haven't had any formal training on teaching badminton

    what do u guys think should be taught to beginners

    obviously how to hold the raquet, swing etc.

    the problem i find w/teaching things like this is that students usually just want to hit the shuttle/ball..they dont want to do the nesseccary things needed to learn proper technique quicky.. like practice footwork or the swing, etc.

    and also when teaching badminton its easy to teach someone one on one becuase at least all my shots are proper feeds..but if i tell 2 students to do clearing drills w/eachother, neither one will hit a proper clear feed to the other.. (not in all cases tho)

    any advice would be appreciated thanks
     
  2. boyboy

    boyboy Regular Member

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    well... most important, the right footworks!!! then... proper technics.... as in proper way of clears, attacking clears, drops and stuff. accuracy and try to improve their stamina.

    well.... teaching kids is allot harder coz they're not serious... they just want to hit shuttles.... as for those who really want to train... u'll be suprise how hard they try.

    still.... you need to have the right way of teaching. the correct technics.... the correct footworks.. and maybe u need to show some shots as well... "nicely done" demos.

    My point of view is Good players may not be good coaches, and god coaches are not always good players.....

    ;)
     
  3. gerry

    gerry Regular Member

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    Are you coaching juniors or adults ?

    FirstlyI must say the best thing would be to go on a leaders/instructor/coach's course, this will help you enormously to identify setting up a programme and can help you not to teach any bad habits that you may have.

    The most important factor when teaching beginners, especially juniors but adults too, is to ensure that they enjoy themselves, let them have fun, of course they want to hit shuttles, don't we all, I've been on courses with internationals and the highest coaches in the land, I love the talks and the demos but I can't wait to hit a shuttle !!

    With clears you will probably have to do the feeding until they become more effficient but I think expecting beginners to clear to each other is a rather high expectation, just let them have the pleasure of hitting a shuttle over the net, they have an interest in badminton, you must keep that going. There's no point in the first few weeks doing a lot of excercise, shadow badminton etc then leave only the last 15 mins to hit shuttles. Not that I'm saying you do but you get my point.

    Of course I don't know what stage your students are at or their expectations, are your expectations the same as theirs ? Sometimes we have to lower our own expectations to suit the class, they may not want to become great players but in saying that there should be a structure to your session that they have to follow, i.e warm up, shot practice, footwork, positional play etc etc, whatever you feel is right for them but lots of games, fun games,restricted or normal games, during them you can walk round and give individual advice. Anyone that doesn't want to follow your structure will have to give way to those that do. Eventually you will be able to increase the time spent on footwork etc with those that are really interested.

    I hope this has been useful in some way.

    Good luck with any coaching that you decide to do.

    This advice is regarding beginners only, with advanced players it would be a different ball game !!

    Where are you based ?
     
    #3 gerry, Jul 28, 2002
    Last edited: Jul 28, 2002
  4. wedgewenis

    wedgewenis Regular Member

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    i'm in Canada

    i wanted to teach at my brother's High School becuase they had a pretty decent turnout of students for their afterschool sessions..but the coach sucked and they didn't learn anything hardly

    and mabye at the local junior high also because they usually have alot of interest tehre.. but again no coach :(



    most of them dont take it seriously but only in my opinion becuase they have never seen it played properly
     
  5. badrad

    badrad Regular Member

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    create a lesson plan.

    if you are planning to coach, you need to prepare a lesson plan. you have to prepare in advance of the session what you intend to teach, and the method of delivery and expectations. if it is to a large group, you need to ensure that there are proper group drills and that you provide corresponding feedback to all participants. if it is a small group, you can provide more personalized training.

    there are coaching courses offered (badminton bc is offering on next week in August) and these go towards your national certification, a helpful resume tool for coaching jobs.

    have fun! ;)
     
  6. Cheung

    Cheung Moderator

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    Going on a coaching course is definately very helpful.

    For the one I went on, not only were we taught how to teach a technique, we were also shown common errors by people (and how to recognise them), arrangement of class, how to stop people from becoming bored, how to use up the court space to maximum efficency, how to be safe (i.e. not let the racquet swing go and hit somebody else teeth), etc.

    i do not think it is easy to teach badminton unless one has had formal training in all basics.

    In HK one must go through a basic skills test first before being able to apply for the coaching course. it is held every month and has about 24 people each class. Out of this, perhaps only one or two people will pass. That just shows how difficult it is in HK to get through the prelim stage!
     
  7. Winex West Can

    Winex West Can Regular Member

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    Level I Coaching in Vancouver, BC

    I phoned Badminton BC and the following is the information on the upcoming Level I coaching course.

    It's scheduled to run from Aug 5 to Aug 9 at the Hollyburn Club in West Vancouver (all whites only). The course runs from 11:00 am to 4:30 pm and the cost is CAD$125.00. I was told that the course includes a practical and that there are only a few spaces left.

    Interested folks are to phone Badminton BC at (604) 737-3030.
     
  8. badrad

    badrad Regular Member

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    no racist

    just for clarication - all white CLOTHING only. :D although it is a rather antiquated rule, this is the club policy.
     
  9. adelina76

    adelina76 Regular Member

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    Coaching etc..

    WW,

    I've no experience in coaching before but as a player that has been coached by coaches, I can tell you before you even start coaching or draw out any plans, perhaps it is more important for you to first find the objective of your coaching.

    I think you mention you intend to coach High School kids. Maybe it will help you in terms of deciding how to coach them, is to first find a goal that you (or they) want to achieve with the coaching. What I mean is for example, is this just to teach them the basics, as in these players are totally new to badminton? Or are you coaching them so they can represent their school? Obviously, the coaching is going to be different depending on what your goal is and the difference will be in the manner of the intensity, the level of strokeplay and level of fitness.

    If you are teaching pure beginners, then even before they pick up a racquet, I think it is important to concentrate on their badminton fitness. Please bear in mind that this fitness is very different to other types of fitness from other sports discipline. Hehe, I know because when I was in high school, I was excelling in both badminton and tennis and found that with tennis, as it wasn't as explosive in terms of intensity, I did not have to be as court fit, as I do in badminton.

    I think equally important are the basics, especially good grounding of footwork. Take your example on the players not being able to clear properly during feeding practice to each other. There could be 1001 reasons why this happened, i.e wrong grip on the racquet, wrong timing, wrong body stance while hitting the shot, poor (or no) visualisation skill and hitting the shot while being out of position (the hitter, not the feeder).

    When I first coached (at about 9 y.o), my coach was from the old school mentality, i.e kinda like your typical kung fu movie type 'si fu' coaching. I remember we had 3 hours of training each evening. The first hour was completely dedicated to just skipping and other fitness exercise! The second hour was dedicated to footwork grounding and basic grounding (i.e learning to switch grips and to hit basic shots like clears, drops etc and being corrected in terms of technique etc). Then the last hour is split into 2. First half an hour dedicated to singles drills and doubles drills and last an hour, putting practice into play..so basically had a couple of doubles games etc.

    Looking back now, I wished I've stuck with it, then I prolly would have gone somewhere. But as a 9 y.o, that was really really hard! I found a lot of time all I wanted to do is PLAY!!! Hehe..typical..didn't understand that I had to master the basics first before moving ahead further *sigh* Oh well..but basically, perhaps if your coaching is also divided into different focus on different aspects of badminton, then it will be a reasonably complete coaching.

    That's just my 2 cents worth :)

    Adelina
     
  10. wedgewenis

    wedgewenis Regular Member

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    i want to show them that badminton is *cool*

    hehe
     
  11. wedgewenis

    wedgewenis Regular Member

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    sounds like you had a pretty kewl coach

    he should have done the physical taining aspect afterwards tho
     
  12. gerry

    gerry Regular Member

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    Re: Coaching etc..



    I don't know about N.Z but try that in the UK and you will probably lose about 50% of your students after the first 2 weeks, after all they are only beginners, they want to hit shuttles, let them have the pleasure of hitting shuttles over the net before you start hitting them with a fitness regime.
    I coach badminton to primary schoolchildren, my main objective is to keep their interest going, then when they can hit the shuttle over the net, I'll slowly introduce the other aspects of the game which are important but irrelevant if they stop coming.
    I also coach your level in the UK but that is different, you've made the choice, your interest is there and obviously you have the ability that's when coaching becomes a little more serious.


    I found a lot of time all I wanted to do is play 'Nuff said.

    Keep smashing ;-))

    P.S I toured N.Z for 5 weeks 3 years ago but found it difficult to find places to play, next time can you help......you could make me run round the court and say " told you so "...........;-))
     
  13. adelina76

    adelina76 Regular Member

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    Re: Re: Coaching etc..



    True....good point..yes, when I was a beginner, all I wanted to do was play, but it was my fault really for attending coaching where it's meant for building up serious budding high level type badminton players. But where I was growing up, the choices of coaching were limited. You would be lucky that you get selected to be coached as there were way too many kids and not enough coaches to go around my small lil province way back in a tiny island called Langkawi in Malaysia! :p Well, at least I stuck at it for about 6 months before getting unmotivated and giving up on it! *hits self on the head* silly me! Now my basics are not very good due to my lack of commitment..granted, hehe, I was 9..but still! I could be playing for Malaysia at the moment and it could have been me who beat Julia Mann instead of Wong Mei Choo! *giggles* oh well, I can dream, can't I? :)



    Definitely! If u come to NZ next gerry, let me know..remember, you said that "I" make "YOU" run around..not the other way!!!!! Okey? promise?! :)

    Adelina
     
  14. gerry

    gerry Regular Member

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    Re: Re: Re: Coaching etc..

    Alas it doesn't take too much to make me run round the court these days, it's not the running around that's so bad it's the stopping to use the oxygen mask that I find difficult ;-)) my days of playing singles are definetly over !!!

    I guess that the '76 in "adelina 76" is the year of your birth, if I'm right then you're still young enough to play at a decent level....so keep going !!

    In days gone by I used to play with a NZ international but can't for the life of me remember his name...........with the memory going and the oxygen mask......maybe it's time that I retired from badminton...........2 chances........slim and none ;-))

    BTW I loved NZ, I was on a 6 month world tour, NZ was the best country that I visited.

    Keep smashing
    Gerry
     
  15. wedgewenis

    wedgewenis Regular Member

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    I don't know about N.Z but try that in the UK and you will probably lose about 50% of your students after the first 2 weeks, after all they are only beginners, they want to hit shuttles, let them have the pleasure of hitting shuttles over the net before you start hitting them with a fitness regime.
    --------------------------------------------------------

    dude your right :0

    these things are important

    but to a beginner who hasn't yet decided if he is going to really Be a badminton player .. these things just aren't going to be enjoyable

    only people who have a dream of being a great player are going to appreciate this kind of activity



    i dont even like doing fitness drills..and i've been playing for 3 years. .and it is my wish to be one of the best badminton players ..at least where i live

    its hard to motivate myself to do court footwork drills and aditional fitness stuff

    definately not going to go well w/beginners
     
  16. Joanne

    Joanne Regular Member

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    When I first went for training, I remeber the coach thought us all the positions and footwork. Later in my training, the coach had a match. Everyone palyed against each other,l I won 8/10. Lost to the 2 older boys. :(
     
  17. JChen99

    JChen99 Regular Member

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    I thought I'd jus add onto this thread

    Moving onto Highschool, my sister(14 goin onto 15 in september 2003... i think) is interested in picking up badminton, and appointed me (yes appointed... frankly I have no choice but to teach her) as coach (yippie -.-") to teach her how to play badminton during her summer break. I'm planning to take the theory course at Douglas during the week of April 28th, and maybe the technical course offerered at Hollyburn (if they offer a cession during the time I have my inter-semester break... ai... so many things I gotta do jus so my sister learns the game properly from me)

    Since my sister is absolutely new to this sport, I will have to teach her from scratch. I'm thinking of lesson plans in the following order:
    Intro to the game/rules
    Grip
    Serve
    Clear
    Footwork
    But then after footwork I have no idea what to teach. Personally, I've learned smash first (cuz when I started it was only games at the local community center with a whole bunch of friends) but I dont think that's a good idea because IMO right now, clear is very important (its form carrys over to all the other shots dropshots/smashes) and also, with smashes there's no footwork involved yet, because I dont know if she can absorb all this within a summer, and she's planning to join the team at her soon-to-be highschool in September.

    I'm not exactly that good a player (for those of you who know me personally can confirm this ^^"), and definately not good enough to be coaching on an extended circumstance, however, my sister insists that she learns from me, and whatever she does she has high expectations, so I'm kinda scared that I'll screw her up ><

    so... I have a "few" questions
    1. Should I get someone who's more experienced to teach her? or is it ok for me to personally teach her the baiscs?
    2. She's never played badminton (except in school during PE, but then middle school PE classes dont teach anything useful) and I dont know if I should offer her with a lighter racket (MP100 3U), or a racket that's on the heavier side, to use (Ti-10SP 2U) or do I have to get another racket jus so she wont hurt her arm/hand/wrist when she first starts playing? because the MP100 is strung at about 20 lbs, so I'm also afraid that, because the MP100 is an extremely stiff racket, that it will produce shock to her arms, which is not good for her at a young age
    Also, she's amphi-(something) and she can use both hands in the sports she does, (she used to be able to use both hands to hold chopsticks too!) and I'm wondering how I would be able to determine which hand would be her optimal racket hand? or work overtime and teach her how to use both hands :p
    3. If I do end up teaching her, how is the sequence of things that I plan to teach her in? (assuming that I dont get a chance to take the technical course at hollyburn... actually, for those that know, do they even teach you how to plan out lesson plans? or is it pure technical?)
    4. Should I get her to improve her cardio first? or later when I'm teaching footwork? Or at the same time I'm teahing her the basics of the game?
    5. How to get courts!? cuz once past the stages of basic theories of the game, I'll eventually have to take her onto a court and teach her some technical stuff (clears, etc) Have anyone who live in GVA have any experiences with this? All I know is Cameron Rec Center in bby have Open Gym Times Fridays 1 something to 4:50 sometimes, and I might be able to work something out with Cameron. Otherwise, I'll have to teach her during drop-in times, but then the courts will be overcrowded and people complain too much!!!!!

    Some/any responce/answers to the question would be VERY MUCH APPRECIATED!

    btw... I'm not sure if I should've started a new thread on this or not... for the admins, if you think this is better as an independent thread, by all means, please make adjustments!
     
    #17 JChen99, Mar 14, 2003
    Last edited: Mar 14, 2003
  18. Cheung

    Cheung Moderator

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    I think it's OK to knock the shuttle around to her. That will develop some hand-eye coordination.

    If she wants to learn basics, it's better she goes to somebody like Badrad.

    What racquet? Give her the spare that you can't sell (MP55)!!:cool:
     
  19. JChen99

    JChen99 Regular Member

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    so it doesn't matter if the racket's on the heavier side of the scale? cuz persoanlly I find it somewhat cumbersome myself...

    Also, Badrad teaches in small groups(and they're already IMO pretty much past "basics"), and persoanlly I find it easier to learn in the beginning if it were taught 1-on-1
     
  20. Cheung

    Cheung Moderator

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    A long time ago, all of used to use 2U or heavier. There wasn't the choice. Also see FAQ section for beginner's racquets and the current thread in equipment section.

    I wrote "somebody LIKE Badrad..":)

    I agree with one on one/one on two training. Maybe you can find somebody even better and share the lesson with her. This is what my wife and I did. Whilst she did her routines, I'd take a breather and vice versa. We used to do 2 hour sessions. It hurt at first but got easier later.

    BTW, is offence spelt "offense" in N America? I thought they were two different words...
     

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