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Team player: or not..perspectives

Discussion in 'General Forum' started by Cheung, Jan 28, 2012.

  1. Cheung

    Cheung Moderator

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    After a long break, I have been roped into playing competitive matches recently.

    This thread really is not about me though.

    The other night we had a team practice - 6 players with 3 doubles pairings. we will play another team.

    I won't say the team is supercompetitive in standard - it encompasses a big variation in standard across the six players.

    I set up some team training just doing some routines and feeding. Most players are pretty good - do the routines and practice looking to improve.

    But there is always the odd one out. We are a pretty polite bunch of people it has to be said. But there is one guy who blows his trumpet a little more than others (more to his past[which cannot be validated] than his present) and very reluctant to do routines (always says 'play games').

    I did manage to get him on for a drill for doubles. Mainly mid court smashes, coming into the net and then doing drives. (he is showing a midline waistline). Hits a lot of shuttles at me. Tells me later "Do you know why I hit to you? It slows you down feeding"...hmm, what's the point of training then?

    Onto games then later in the session. I have to say the guy has good touch but certainly not the best and physically can do more. There were some stronger players on the night...the objective of the practice matches is to improve on the game. So we have about 2 very strong players trying to explain to this player what he can do to improve. He listens but either doesn't care, or too full of himself so he cannot change. It was a deliberate strategy by me to point out big areas where improvement can make a difference by stronger players but it didn't work.

    So we have players who is clearly better than the weaker players but clearly not as strong as the strongest players, out of condition (i.e. when the going gets tough, the mind goes weak), will argue that yin is yang and vice versa (well not that bad:), doesn't play for his partner, cannot change the pace of the rally to create the advantage in the rally, and clearly is a personality who is very confident of himself to a point where it is difficult for him to improve.

    Perhaps I got it wrong - this person doesn't want to improve.:eek:

    It's not really a rant. Just a point for discussion. It seems a pity when courts are so hard to come by and there is the opportunity for drills and improvement, the opportunity cannot be taken..
     
  2. JukUx

    JukUx Regular Member

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    wow! sorry to hear that Cheung!

    He actually kept smashing at you and said that? what a BEEEEPPPP. I would have smashed him in the face if he ever did that to me lol What a jerk. -_- How'd you even deal with it so calmly lol I would have told him to get the hell out

    Butttt

    Besides that, I can see why he doesn't want to drill. I honestly HATE drilling. I avoid it so often that it really annoys me too! I am not denying that doing drills is a bad thing or anything, but for me, I really hate doing group drills. I hate doing something that I know I can already do basically and I rather do something that I know that I need to work on. Example, I wouldn't be really motivated if I had to do drives as I know I could be using this time to do footwork or work on obtaining a consistent backhand.

    In my own experience, I do prefer to play games because it helps me more then drills imho. When I play games it gives me more experience, it gives me that feel and motivate to improve on my mistakes. Example, when I hit a bad shot on a consistent basis and I get punished for it like doing a backhand drop all the time when I am force to use my backhand. Then I'd get a buddy to hit to my backhand and I'd try to clear and smash etc. Playing games for me just builds up all the experience I have and its really helped my court vision and spotting holes in people's games. And I do have proof of this. I had vids posted up here from one year ago and you can see my drastic improvements if I posted a recent vids.

    I am not saying doing drills aren't useful, but I believe if you have done enough skill to hit all the basic shots, I think its better if you just seek private training or just do some freestyle drills on something you prefer to do. I think this is the better way to improve a lot. I mean if you are aware of it, you'll be more focused to improve it.

    I have seen many people do drills everyday of their life, yet on the court, they don't do ****.They make the same basic mistakes that they always do and doing "drills" was suppose to fix it. I think more on the basis that if you can do all the stuff consistently, go out and play games. You'll learn much faster then to keep doing mindless drills.

    Back on topic, I can see where this guy is coming from, but I just thinks he needs an attitude change lol I mean if he won't listen to stronger players showing him what his doing wrong, then I think there is nothing you can do about it lol it's his attitude and motivation, strive to getting better, is just not present and I guess he just won't improve haha.

    Just my own opinion :) and sorry for any errors :p
     
  3. cappy75

    cappy75 Regular Member

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    I love doing drills and practice strokes, they really condition my muscles to perform better. Games (practice or competitive) are great for working out the kinks in doubles partnership but by themselves will not improve player's standard unless he plays with stronger players.

    My weekly routine includes one group lesson (Tuesdays), one private lesson(Saturdays), gym time (Saturdays) and two drop-ins (Wednesdays and Saturdays). I find that the drills and instructions from my coaches makes all my games even better (strong smash, longer rallies and more creative shots).

    I find players like the guy Cheung's talking about have no idea how to play properly and oblivious to what's happening on court. Given time, they will be ostracized by others. I think Cheung should keep him out of the practice, soon he'll find out the hard way when he's starting to lose all his games. Since courts are so hard to come by, Cheung should find someone who's more willing to do drills to join the team rather than waste precious resources cultivating someone who doesn't want to learn.
     
    #3 cappy75, Jan 29, 2012
    Last edited: Jan 29, 2012
  4. Fidget

    Fidget Regular Member

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    The "difficult personality" is a type that is everywhere in life. We can't avoid them. And, in fact, their stubborn self-confidence is often how they acheived whatever successes they enjoy. But they are difficult to manage in a team setting. They are quick to see faults in others, but blind to their own. Their skins are alligator-thick to criticism -- constructive or otherwise. And the only good ideas they've ever heard are their own.

    There are, no doubt, seminars for businesesmen on how to handle this personality type. But unless you are good at psychology and have infinite patience, it is highly unlikely that you are going to change this guy's attitude. Therefore either take him as he is and don't give yourself a migraine trying to improve him OR cut him loose and gird your loins for the "you're cutting ME!" speech.
     
    #4 Fidget, Jan 29, 2012
    Last edited: Jan 29, 2012
  5. Cheung

    Cheung Moderator

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    This guy plays match play all the time so does he improve by just playing games? I don't think so. Basically, we are in a one-to-one position - I am the coach doing the feeding. And I have been through coaching courses myself;)

    I think Toby Ng (Canadian National Player) alluded to the situation in his thread. Practice makes perfect - how do you if your shot is perfect? OK, so it may be perfect against a few types of opponent - is it effective against the majority of opponents? Is it as effective when you get to a higher level of play? Is it as consistent and perfect when the going gets tough when you are tired or under pressure?

    Are drills less important for some people? I'm not sure. I've seen koreans and chinese etc international players on practice courts and they still play out drills. I saw Kim Dong Moon putting some of the Canadian players through drills during the HK Open. I would say the Canadians, although not the strongest players in the world, are still pretty sound in their technique and shot play!
     
  6. Cheung

    Cheung Moderator

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    Thanks Cappy and Fidget. You are right. I will move on. There are other people who can make better use of the time and have the right motivation. Of course I don't want to impose myself on anybody and create any tensions.

    Perhaps, all I can say to him is "Why are you losing?" Anything else gets a counterargument excuse of "but...".....I can add them to the 101+ excuses in badminton...
     
  7. limsy

    limsy Regular Member

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    well
    honestly
    there is some people who dont like training
    like me
    i never train myself
    whenever on court,i just play matches
    hehe
    i play for fun and joy,not for improvement though
    not sure about this guy
     
  8. Cheung

    Cheung Moderator

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    But the difference is that this guy has to play for improvement as he is playing a match....
     
  9. johnv

    johnv Regular Member

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    Sign up some reserves for the team and do some selection trials, a bit of internal competition may provide the incentive to improve.
     
  10. limsy

    limsy Regular Member

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    then need to do like what johnv said in post 9
    hehe
    all the best for u!
     
  11. shooting stroke

    shooting stroke Regular Member

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    There is certain type of player that thinks when its near to a competitive match be it a friendly or tournament, it's just a waste of time and effort to train and just by playing is a more "preferable" approach for self improvement. Be it because he think he is better than the rest or the method of training conducted by his team mate is not the right way or its just because he's born with an irritating, non-cooperative team work spirit or all of the above, it is just better to replace him with other cooperative player that can create a more high moral, team work spirit.

    Some player will think that practicing badminton regularly will not necessarily make you perfect since its all about how you play that will eventually determine how good you are hence looking into doing drills will be his less priority. But i assure you that practicing regularly is not just about being perfect in terms of technique in all aspect of your game play but its also about how a player can perfectly maintain his consistency and how perfectly a player can adapt to his opponent style of play and turn that into his advantage.

    If its seems not polite to get rid of him, such player is better pair with a weaker partner and let him realize how high heaven and earth the importance of training once he lost badly in his match.
     
  12. amleto

    amleto Regular Member

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    I doubt he would do anything but blame his partner first, then blame the captain for putting him with such a weak player...
     
  13. yippo888

    yippo888 Regular Member

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    pick me instead cheung?!!
     
  14. kwun

    kwun Administrator

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    just imagine the dilemma you will face if he is a really strong player!
     
  15. Fidget

    Fidget Regular Member

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    Yes, Cheung will have to make sure he doesn't do a press conference like this: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EB5-yJM3vJc :rolleyes:
    It could come back and bite him like it did to that coach when the 'unworkable' player became an MVP.
     
  16. Cheung

    Cheung Moderator

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    Yes. That is exactly what would happen.

    haha, I don't pick people. It's only a moan.

    Hardly likely my dear Fidget.:)
     
  17. cappy75

    cappy75 Regular Member

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    Only when you're perfect in your execution that you can truly be creative in your game. Practice makes perfect. For those who hate drills and practice, you're missing out on how exciting badminton can be. I have been playing the game for more than a decade. I started from casual drop-ins to regular plays to routine training with regular plays, and I can tell you from experience that the game becomes so much more enjoyable with faster pace and less unforced errors. More practice means less unforced errors, less unforced errors means longer rallies and less time wasted picking up shuttles.
     
    #17 cappy75, Jan 30, 2012
    Last edited: Jan 30, 2012
  18. visor

    visor Regular Member

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    Cheung:

    Who had decided that you will organize and oversee the practice and drill session?

    Most likely the fella doesn't feel that you have any authority over him and the others, telling him what to do. This is usually what happens in social club play.

    I often learn that even if I wanted to I can't offer any advice to help someone if they don't themselves ask for it first.
    And so, there are players at my club who get sore shoulders and arms from playing with overly high tensions and head heavy rackets. :(
     
    #18 visor, Jan 30, 2012
    Last edited: Jan 30, 2012

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