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Terms used when we talk about Badminton Techniques and Training (Strokes/Shots)

Discussion in 'Techniques / Training' started by chris-ccc, Aug 2, 2010.

  1. Loh

    Loh Regular Member

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    Wood Shot - Shot that results when the base of the shuttle is hit by the frame of the racket. Once illegal, this shot was ruled acceptable by the International Badminton Federation in 1963.

    I think this term also relates to the old days when the racket frame was made of wood, like the brand "Dunlop/Maxply" which is heavier, unlike today. When you hit the wooden frame the shuttle can bounce off in an unexpected direction and can catch your opponent totally by surprise. It was once considered NOT a 'clean' hit, therefore a "fault". Not now anymore.

    I think similarly when the shuttle touches the net tape on its way to your opponent's court, it was once considered a fault or "re-serve" (let) depending on whether it landed on or beyond the short service line or not, like in table-tennis.

    Now, it is considered OK if it lands on or beyond the short service line.
     
    #141 Loh, Apr 9, 2011
    Last edited: Apr 9, 2011
  2. Loh

    Loh Regular Member

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    The Wood Shot Abolished - Thanks to Dr Oon Chong Teck

    An interesting account of how the then Malayan medical student, Dr Oon initiated the proposal and finally won against the tide of European "colonial" politics:

    http://viweb.freehosting.net/OonCT.htm

    On the IBF Council

    In my final year in Cambridge in 1960, Teh Gin Sooi, the Secretary of the Badminton Association of Malaya, wrote to me appointing me the Malayan delegate to the International Badminton Federation meeting to be held that year in London. Malaya had proposed that the wood shot rule be abolished. The old rule had stated that any part of the racket frame hit by the shuttlecock was a fault. This was the first and not the last time I was to encounter European bureaucracy. It took me a long time to prepare and give my speech and although I had a standing ovation, the proposal was not passed. As I was already well known and respected in the badminton fraternity, I was elected as a council member.

    I found out that the voting system was very much loaded against the Asian countries. The President, Vice-President, Secretary and Treasurer all had a vote. All the founder members, which consisted mainly of the European countries, Great Britain - conveniently split up into England, Ireland, Scotland and Wales with a vote each - had big votes. One vote was given for every 10 years of membership, and many of these European nations had been members for 30 to 40 years! One extra vote was given for participating in a Thomas cup or Uber cup competition. A country like England would have 6 votes while a new country like Indonesia 2 votes!

    Furthermore, no postal votes were allowed, and delegates had to be present to vote. Poor countries like the Philippines, Hong Kong and Ceylon could not afford to send any delegates and so could not vote. England, Scotland, Ireland, Wales, America, Canada, Australia, New Zealand, France, Denmark, Sweden, Norway, Belgium usually all voted together to prevent this rule 14(h) from being changed. The western countries favoured this law because they felt that to play good badminton the shuttle must strike the centre of the racket. But Asians play so fast that they tend to wood shot more so the skilled Europeans could not retrieve it! Basically it was better for the sport to abolish rule 14(h) as ‘woods’ were so hard to detect and players often were penalized when a stroke sounded like a wood shot.

    Due to my persistence in fighting for abolition of rule 14(h) year after year, the opposing countries were very bored with my presence and I was not very popular since I was not one of them. Some of the opposing delegates, I found out, did not necessarily vote as instructed by their associations for many reasons and some countries requested the English secretary Mr Herbert Scheele, who was very pro-British and was not for the Asians, to find delegates for them!

    Being a council member of the International Badminton Federation was no fun, as the majority of the members were Europeans and they were very ‘colonial’ in their mentality, very arrogant, and tended to elect each other year after year. The few Asians who were there were the yes-men; they did not like opposition. Despite my studies and badminton commitment I fought very hard for the abolition of the wood shot. I even had a petition signed by the top English players but to no avail, as their representative to the IBF simply voted against it. Fortunately, I had the help of my family, especially my father, Oon Khye Beng who at that time had already retired to live in England. He did the secretarial work, and contacted all the members of the IBF that were neutral, so that they might come over to our side, as well as to convince those who were not for us. If e-mail had been available at that time it would have been a boon! We even made contact with the anti-apartheid African countries for their support, as well as the council of African Unity. Every year was a disappointment; we were always crushed!

    The big day came at the AGM of the IBF on July 2, 1963. At the meeting it appeared Malaya had to start all over again when the opposition found out that some of the countries that were supporting us were in arrears with their subscription and so would be barred from voting. Fortunately, I had enough money on me! So I straight away went across and paid all their arrears for them, even for a few years for some!! We needed a two thirds majority to have the wood shot rule changed. By the skin of our teeth we survived 60 votes for us, and 30 against - exactly the two thirds we needed! 26 countries had supported us while 8 were against. The report of this meeting appeared in The Straits Times of July 26, 1963, in which the BAM secretary, Teh Gin Sooi, said that "... Dr. Oon is to be congratulated for his yeoman service to the game and for his unflagging efforts to rally round the many nations to our side in the woodshot campaign...". This was my greatest victory in badminton, besides beating Tan Joe Hock the man responsible for the defeat of Malaya in the 1958 Thomas Cup later at the All-England and my most memorable contribution to the sport. The new rule has now stood the test of time for exactly 40 years - and a V.I. boy achieved it!! Players now enjoy the game more but most people today are not aware of how it was changed!
     
  3. chris-ccc

    chris-ccc Regular Member

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    Wood Shot (As per Post #66)

    .
    As per Post #66, Wood Shot = When the shuttlecock is struck by the frame of the racket-head. "Frame Shot" is now gradually replacing this term.

    BTW, not only the frame of the racket-head can be used legally to return the shuttlecock, but any part of the racket can be legal; be it the shaft or the handle.

    Soon we might have terms like; "Shaft Shot" and "Handle Shot". :D:D:D
    .
     
    #143 chris-ccc, May 10, 2011
    Last edited: May 10, 2011
  4. Loh

    Loh Regular Member

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    But don't stretch your luck too far and execute a "hand shot". :D
     
  5. chris-ccc

    chris-ccc Regular Member

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    We have fun using the handle of the racket to hit/return the shuttlecock at Netplay

    .
    At our Coaching And Training Sessions, we do have fun using the handle of the racket to hit/return the shuttlecock (at Netplay). :D:D:D

    However, at any time when the shuttlecock touches our hand/fingers, a "Fault" shall be called.
    .
     
  6. bsmith

    bsmith Regular Member

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    Dink Shot

    As a longtime USA racketball player and relative newcomer to badminton (about a year as of this writing) I am amazed that the dink shot has not been mentioned yet. This is all the more amazing to me because one of BC's most prolific members is DinkAlot.

    I assume he chose that screen name because he "dinks" a lot whenever he plays badminton. To me, a dink shot is the exact same as what has been called a "dribble" shot in this thread.

    One of my six kids, the tallest (6' 3" and 185 pounds) and most powerful hitter of my family, is also a frequent dinker. He can hit almost any reception of the shuttle with such power that you naturally position more rearward in the court to receive his smashes. But he is quick to sense that and will take advantage with either a half smash drop shot or an actual underhanded dink shot forcing you to race to the net to make a save.

    "Save", hey that's another term that could be added as meaning a desperation shot of any kind made solely to keep the shuttle in play no matter how poorly it lays up to your opponent. The only hope you have after most "save" type shots is that your opponent makes some major blunder in handling it.

    Anyway, the lesson I have learned is that a good dink shot is all the more valuable if you also have a big smash that you can employ anywhere on the court. Smashes and dinks are the yin and yang of badminton and all top players are good at both types of shots.
     
  7. neavalmi0421

    neavalmi0421 Regular Member

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    Hello,

    I was searching this thread for a stroke named "Pulled Shot". does anyone have come across this stroke? This is the term use by one coach here in Philippines who got trained in coaching in Denmark. This is executed in the rear court when the shuttle is low or waist level. Hope that someone can explain it more clearly. I believe this is more use by singles players especially when he/she is late to the Fh or bh side of the rear court.
     
  8. chris-ccc

    chris-ccc Regular Member

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    Dink Shot & Pulled Shot

    .
    No, I haven't heard of the 'Dink Shot' and the 'Pulled Shot' before.

    Hope that BCers who know about these 2 shots would post here to enlighten us.
    .
     
  9. alexh

    alexh Regular Member

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    You mean like in this video: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vFOY6MPBs48 at 11:33 (forehand) and again at 11:36 (backhand)? I haven't heard this name for it before; I think of it as a variation of the sliced drop shot.
     
  10. chris-ccc

    chris-ccc Regular Member

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    Dink Shot = Dropshot

    .
    I have been told that the Dink Shot (a term used by Americans) is the Dropshot.

    We need knowledgeable American BCers to confirm if this is true.
    .
     
  11. neavalmi0421

    neavalmi0421 Regular Member

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    Yes, the execution is correct and very similar to the coach demo, however the shuttle location in this video are shoulder height that's why they can be more like the sliced drop shot.
     
  12. alexh

    alexh Regular Member

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    As far as I can tell, you almost never see the pros play this shot at much below shoulder height. If the opponent's last shot was flat, they can intercept it midcourt rather than digging it out of the back corner. If the opponent's last shot was too high to intercept, then there's enough time to move back and take the shuttle before it drops too low.

    Of course for us mere mortals, we don't always move so quickly. If you're late getting to the back corner, my coach says you should bend your knees--you're still taking the shuttle at shoulder height, it's just that your shoulder height is lower!
     
  13. chris-ccc

    chris-ccc Regular Member

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    More terms used in Badminton?

    .
    I hope to learn more terms used in Badminton. :):):)

    To me terms are not just words, but about ideas how new strokes/footwork/etc, etc, ... are introduced into our sport.
    .
     
  14. chris-ccc

    chris-ccc Regular Member

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    .
    I was about to reply 11tatic's post - But 11tatic's post was deleted.
    :confused::confused::confused:
    .
     
  15. thunderracket

    thunderracket Regular Member

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    i see no definiton of smash............
     
  16. ChongHL

    ChongHL Regular Member

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    How about Cross Shot, Cross DropShot and Cross Smash? :D

    Also, what is double action mean?
     
  17. Agile_Monkey

    Agile_Monkey Regular Member

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  18. chris-ccc

    chris-ccc Regular Member

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    We are not only giving the info on terms, but asking BCers to contribute

    .
    We are not only giving the info on terms, but asking BCers to contribute (with more terms that they have mastered/known).

    As we know, terms used in different countries can be different. I was hoping that more BCers (from different countries) can contribute with more terms that some of us don't know.

    Talking about 'double action', there is also 'triple action'. It all depends on how advanced we are (for our regular BCers), that we are talking about here. :):):)
    .
     
  19. Jacob mm

    Jacob mm Regular Member

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    Reverse forehand cut :)
     
  20. Wingu

    Wingu Regular Member

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    In Japan, they use the term "hairpin" generally for shots made infront of the net.
    Also, they use the word "cut" for sliced dropshots.
    They tend to abbrivate "backhand" into "back" only as well. I.e high backhand -> high back.

    In Sweden, we say "stop" for shots made infront of the net.
     

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