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The Art of Singles.

Discussion in 'Techniques / Training' started by Iwan, Apr 3, 2003.

  1. Iwan

    Iwan Regular Member

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    Ok, what's your tips? Im gonna be playing singles in two days time and I'm desperate for tips :) Anyway, Im still very confused about one thing... sometimes, I find myself bending over too much and reaching the shuttles too late when I'm rushing to get the shuttles. So I thought, maybe I should slow down my footwork a bit so that I can prepare for a "smoother" take off instead of a "rougher" take off. What do you guys think?
     
  2. Yodums

    Yodums Regular Member

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    Well, you have to get your serves deep and high. If you do that right, you got like 1/3 or whatever of your work done. For singles lots of people when on the right side like serving near the T (Right handers and left handed would be on the left side) and cut off their angle. Don't give em so much angle that they can smash down the line and as well cross court drop. That had to be what I was doing wrong when I lost in the last tournaments. My serves were rather flat so :/

    Other than that, foot work, clears, and drop are important. If you got a good attacking smash that most of the time will end the rally then that's good too.

    I don't know what else to add unless you have questions.
     
  3. tonny

    tonny Regular Member

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    Ok.....u can hit the shuttle to the 4 corners and make sure ur consistancy is there. U muz also equip urself with more options. Aim for the empty spot and make sure u haf enough physical to take ur opponent on....
     
  4. Winex West Can

    Winex West Can Regular Member

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    Take a look at Jake Downey's Winning Badminton Singles available at www.badmintonbooks.com
     
  5. chan

    chan Regular Member

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    dont overcommit, i tend to do this a lot, its like when y ou play a drop shot, then go charging at the net, but then they play a deep lift, overcommiting will also get you frustrated.... just remember to go back to "home base" lol.
     
  6. Jus_anothr_grl

    Jus_anothr_grl Regular Member

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    just relax and have fun
    don't get frustrated.
    oh and if it's a tight game but you're losing like 5 points in a row, try and see if you can get a drink of water for a minute or two to break your opponent's flow of energy and for you to get a chance to calm down and recollect yourself
     
  7. Yodums

    Yodums Regular Member

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    This is your hint to use deception as well. Do last minute shots e.g. Pretend to drop and flick at the last second.

    Don't try "too hard." This was discussed before that people's performance actually was worst when they tried too hard compared to their relaxed games. You'll probably tense up and keep your wrist locked when you do that.
     
  8. Mag

    Mag Moderator

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    Iwan, from what I recall when we played, you often got into trouble in the rear backhand corner. Your basic strokes were not bad though. You certainly had the stamina and the power, but perhaps lacked some shot consistency.

    So, my advice to you is: don't play too complicated. Keep it simple. Rely on your clears, play them straight or to his backhand (which will most likely keep you out of your backhand corner). Be patient. Don't try to finish the rallies too early.

    Best of luck!
     
  9. Iwan

    Iwan Regular Member

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    Huh?? When did we play? :confused: My most basic weakness is when someone clears to me twice in a row. I often rush to return to base and when they do an attack clear, I feel too lazy sometimes to get behind the shuttle even though I can :( Hmmm... I do remember an article saying you should stay at the back a bit instead of rushing to the base after playing a clear but think of rushing to the front incase they play a dropshot. I've tried doing this, but when i did, I tend to bend over for the shuttle too low, gives me no chance to play a netshot I think.
     
  10. Yodums

    Yodums Regular Member

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    Perhaps you're forgetting foot work? I do that alot in singles even though I may end a drop in racquet foot but alot of the times I'm not using what I was taught etc. Have to keep alot in mind if you want play a perfect game! :)
     
  11. Phil

    Phil Regular Member

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    I think its the other way around.

    If you clear: Go back to "base"
    If you smash/drop/slice/etc.: Don't go all the way back to "base," maybe a step or two short of it, and move directly to where the opponent makes their next shot

    This works for me, and it makes sense too. If you clear and stay at the back, you're gonna get killed by a fast or tight drop shot (which is the situation you describe). If your clears are going back to near the opponents baseline (as they should), you should be able to go back to your "base," since if they clear it back, you should be able to hit it since your well-distanced clear will give you enough time.

    In the case of a smash or drop, if you move back to "base," there is the chance that they could flick it back over you if you are moving too fast back to the middle. But if you, say, drop from the back, and take one big step and a little step back to the middle, you're close enough to the back in case they flick it back, but you should still be able to reach a net shot return. Why? Because moving forward is easier than moving backward.

    Oh, one more thing to help your foot speed, is to lightly bounce on the balls of your feet, since this acts as a sort-of "startup," making it easier to react faster. You want to time the landing of your bounce with the instant the opponent makes their shot. Otherwise, you may be stuck in the air, and can't reach their shot.

    Hope this helps,
    Phil
     
  12. Mag

    Mag Moderator

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    Oops! Pardon me, wrong person! I was in a rush when I wrote the above, mistaking you for somebody else. Sorry for the mixup.

    :eek:
     
  13. Neil

    Neil New Member

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    Hi All,
    I will be posting an article on my website tommorrow (Sat) about advanced singles tatics writen by Steve Butler of England who is now national singles coach for England if i am not mistaken. Take a look if your interested.

    Cheers Neil

    http://www.badminton-zone.co.uk
     
  14. Iwan

    Iwan Regular Member

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    Hey Neil, I was reading Han Jian's footwork article which is on your website... and I was just wondering if he is Zhang Ailing's husband? Cause I heard Ailing and her husband used to coach the Malaysian national team for about 10 yrs or so. And VERY fortunately :D Ailing is here in Perth where I am :D although her husband has been coaching me for two weeks now (they do coaching once a week for casual players who want to improve), I still don't know his name :eek: Which is why Im asking... I just thought it would sound awkward if I approach him and ask him for his name... a badminton fanatic NOT KNOWING a world champ!!! :p hehehee
     
  15. Cheung

    Cheung Moderator

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    Singles

    I think I wrote that but not for a clear;)

    If you have any videos, watch how pros do it.

    How you do your footwork and prepare for you opponents subesequent shot depends on what reply you do with the first shot.

    Scenario: Opponent attack clears to your backhand.

    Your reply: half smash or drop shot. The footwork is one skip towards the centre base. Although you may guess where the shuttle is played to, then only move once the player has hit the shuttle. He is less likely to hit a clear back to the b/hand because you are standing there. That gives him 3 corners to aim at for which you should prepare yourself for.

    Scenario: Opponent attack clears to your backhand.

    Your reply: clear...now what happens next depends on how good your clear is.

    Playing an attack clear means you hit a FAST shot to the back of the court. Your opponent may not have had time to move to the base ie. he is still standing there at the back of the court. Thus you can imagine, it would be easy for him to play a drop shot very quickly.

    You have to play a good quality HIGHER clear giving the opponent a neutral shot. The footwork here is different for different players. I see some internationals skip towards the middle(roslin hashim), most others walk to the base. A higher clear gives you a bit more time to recover to base. The base is not the centre of the court. It is slightly towards the rear of the court from the centre.

    Why not the centre? Because this is based on the principle going forward is easy than going backwards!


    Zhang Ai Ling is not married to Han Jian. I think Han Jian is still in M'sia.
    You better ask hm his name. No shame. Liem Swee King's son didn't know his father played badminton or was AllEngland Champion!(according to some reports)
     
    #16 Cheung, Apr 4, 2003
    Last edited: Apr 4, 2003
  16. RJCMGP

    RJCMGP Regular Member

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    I just played in a team tournament today (individuals are tomorrow) and i was playing singles for my school. The first 2 girls that I played were extremley weak on their clears and basically getting it back far. So I would serve to them or clear it on their serve and when it came back, it would be weak and high so i would smash it. (it made me feel bad and mean because i would be smashing a lot and they wouldn't get it back.) Try to pick out your opponents weakness(es) and play on those.
    Then I played another girl who was my main competition (i expect to be seeing her tomorrow as well). She had a good forehand clear and good basic movement. But her faults were that she went waaay too far back before i would serve it, and then i would serve it short to throw her off because she started so far back and then she couldn't get it. Also, on my serve she would bail out of clearing or driving and she would just tip it over and then i could just put it to the back, wait for it too come over weaker and smash or drive it. So, try to avoid tipping on the serve and becoming predictable and don't start too far back.
    Generally, try to go back to the base. I try to do this after all shots, except for a smash or a slice, on those i will only take 1 or 2 short steps forward. It's just a tendency, but it seems to be an ok thing to do for me.
    I hope that this helps (but i'm most likely not telling you anything that you don't already know) I off to get some rest for day 2 of the tournament. wish me luck!;)
     

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