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Unusual Unit for Tension

Discussion in 'Badminton Stringing Techniques & Tools' started by FEND., May 17, 2004.

  1. FEND.

    FEND. Regular Member

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    OK, I know you guys hate answering questions like these which are repeated, but I cannot find any post which is of the same nature with my question.

    My question is the tension. When I restring my racquets, the guy just asks whether I want 60, 70 or something like that. Could someone explain what it translates into?

    I found another guy to do my stringing who uses pounds but this current man I go to really often and I get good prices. So please anyone?
     
  2. LazyBuddy

    LazyBuddy Regular Member

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    Maybe another unit, besides kg and lb.

    Tell him ur desired tension in kg or lb, and ask him to show ur the converstion chart and calculate the # with his unit in front of u. ;)
     
  3. FEND.

    FEND. Regular Member

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    Thanks!

    Thanks! Not A bad idea. I will do that when I go for restringing and check it out. But just curious has anyone come across such units being used? If so I wouldn't mind if anyone could explain! Thanks again!!
     
  4. taneepak

    taneepak Regular Member

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    I have never heard of tension at 60 or 70. Are you sure he was not talking about 60 lbs or 70 lbs tension for tennis racquets? Badminton racquet tension is expressed in lbs or kg and nothing else.
     
  5. bluejeff

    bluejeff Regular Member

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    Maybe the machine has it's own scaling unit. There must be a conversion chart there. 60 doesn't sound like kg nor pound.
     
  6. cheongsa

    cheongsa Regular Member

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    Sounds like newtons, although 60 N = 13.5 lbs is very low for badminton racket strings.

    100 N = 22.5 lbs is close to what I have on my strings.
     
  7. bigredlemon

    bigredlemon Regular Member

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    I'd like to see that unit become more popular :eek:
     
  8. FEND.

    FEND. Regular Member

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    I Got An Answer!!

    Well guys, I went to my racquet shop today 'cause my exams were over :D only today so mom brought me there and I asked the man what is my tension? He said it was around 70 and when I asked him to translate it into pounds he said it was 25 pounds!!

    So I'm like :confused: lol right now, and I finally found out what string he gave me when I bought the racquet a BG 66 stringed at 25 pounds on my new muscle power 23. Just to let you guys know!!!

    So its maybe 25lbs x 3 = 75 units of something?? Anyways I'm gonna test out the racquet in training further and see if I need a restring.

    Thanks for the help!
     
  9. cappy75

    cappy75 Regular Member

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    Er... he still hasn't answered your question yet. 60 or 70 of what?!! What's the unit? Is he the only stringer who goes by this idiosyncratic measurement?

     
  10. FEND.

    FEND. Regular Member

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    mmm yea i noticed that :p. Anyways he said that his 'unit' was equivelent to 25 pounds? So I'm still searching for the answer. Any developments will be posted here :cool:
     
  11. taneepak

    taneepak Regular Member

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    Some badminton stringing machines come with a maximum tension of 36 lbs. That stringer has probably assigned a percentage scale of 0% to 100% to correspond with the tension scale of 0 lbs to 36 lbs. 70% of 36 gives you an approximate 25 lbs.
     
  12. jamesd20

    jamesd20 Moderator

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    Genius Taneepak!!
     
  13. coops241180

    coops241180 Regular Member

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    sounds like a good answer - i'm still trying to convert between lbs/sq. in and kgs/sq cm.

    thought that might have given the answer...

    not got there yet tho.. :S
     
  14. FEND.

    FEND. Regular Member

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    Taneepak you really are a genius. Your answer makes more sense than mine, a hellotaa sense. :D Thanks for it!
     
  15. cappy75

    cappy75 Regular Member

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    Now that would make more sense than saying 60 or 70 alone. Heck! He didn't even quote the figures in percentage:confused:. Still, I think the stringer should quote in the proper units. Not everybody would know what he's talking about... like FEND.'s situation.

     
  16. LazyBuddy

    LazyBuddy Regular Member

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    Sounds like a reasonable answer. This might especially useful for a drop weight type of machine. With different "weight" for different rackets (tennis, badminton, racket ball), it might be hard to remember all the "conversion chart". Therefore, percentage might be the easiest one for "unit".
     
  17. cooler

    cooler Regular Member

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    that 'old' machine is prolly for badminton only. I doubt 36 lbs is good for tennis.
     
  18. forrestyung

    forrestyung Regular Member

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    36lbs may be too low for tennis, I think it is much applicable for squash. :D
     
  19. tir168

    tir168 Regular Member

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    cappy75, the stringer here usually just say 60 or 70, they don't tell us the units are. =P

    and i believe that taneepak has the most logical answer to the question. Thanks, now at least i know what the stringers mean. Usually i would just ask them to estimate a value for me. :D I am not a pro at the game/rackets alike yet. :p

    so does it mean now that i have to find out the max stringing for that paticular stringer's machine, then calculate somemore just to know? or is it that all standard stringing machines are max. at 36lbs?
     
    #19 tir168, May 22, 2004
    Last edited: May 22, 2004
  20. FEND.

    FEND. Regular Member

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    Need to clarify the 70 thing.

    Today I went to collect my Cab30MS 3U (Yes, I got myself one.) And I asked the man what tension he put it. He said he gave tension 72.4 using BG 66 ( Black string mind you. )

    So after walking like 10 - 15 mins there from my house, I stopped and had a chat with the man. I asked him to clarify the stringing tension for me. He brought me to this old stringing machine and showed me the tension weights and all. It was a 2 point stringing machine which can be used to string up to 36.25 pounds and to my surprise that rating on the other side is 80. So in theory, 80 is the maximum tension which happens to be 36.25 . So after calculation, my cab30ms is strung at roughly 32.58 lbs.

    Not bad don't you think? Btw this stringer can string the racquet, 1 piece stringing in roughly 15 mins. I bet you guys can't do that.

    ~Cheers
     

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