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Wats the ruling to this?

Discussion in 'Rules / Tournament Regulation / Officiating' started by dolphin123, Apr 26, 2008.

  1. dolphin123

    dolphin123 New Member

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    Hi everyone,

    I was wondering if someone can clear this ruling for me. I was playing badminton with someone and he did a very good drop shot on me. Whilst I was trying to retrieve the drop shot I noticed that the person was at the net waving his raquet about, either trying to put me off or incept the birdie.

    I was wondering if this was allowed? Lets say his raquet, DID NOT cross my side.
     
  2. jhirata

    jhirata Regular Member

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    Yeah.. it's allowed. But there's a solution.. do a shallow, flick lift.. like Peter Gade's trademark shot. Well.. just hold the racquet at one position for like half a second as if you're going to drop it back at him, then flick it.. but in order to do this, you need good footwork.

    There are other solutions as well.. but the most important thing you need is footwork.. because if you drop it back at him, he can just lift it and you'll be in trouble if your footwork isn't fast/efficient enough..
     
  3. Mark A

    Mark A Regular Member

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    Racket waving is only illegal if he actually hits the bird while it's on your side of the net. Anything up to this point is OK (and is sometimes a legitimate tactic).

    If it's bothering you, use a mid-court push, or do another lift and wait for something more advantageous.
     
  4. dolphin123

    dolphin123 New Member

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    Thanks Guys,

    Hows about if he was waving slighty OVER my court but does not hit the birdie. Is this allowed? Will it be a fault straight away as soon as his raquet goes over my side?

    Thanks
     
  5. ionoo

    ionoo Regular Member

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    an opponent's racket is suppose to remain on his/her side I believe so if he goes over the net into your territory illegal....
     
  6. markham player

    markham player Regular Member

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    I'm not sure about the new rulings now but from my limited memories point of view, it may be ruled as interference if the guys waving his racquet continously unless he raised his racquet & stayed up then it is legitimate.
     
  7. llpjlau

    llpjlau Regular Member

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    what about if the guy just places his racket at the net? this happens mostly in doubles where the front opponent places his racket right above the tape, so to speak, when im trying to retrieve a net shot. i believe this is illegal because i don't see pros doing it. someone clear about this?
     
  8. Winex West Can

    Winex West Can Regular Member

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    Under rule 13 - Faults, the following subsections
    So 13.4.5 should cover the distraction of the player staying in front and waving his racket around and 13.4.4 should cover the obstruction of having his racket at the top of the net. It's okay for the player to raise his racket to the top of the net to intercept your shot AFTER you have played it but not before (as that would be obstruction).
     
  9. t3tsubo

    t3tsubo Regular Member

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    like winex said, i pretty sure the only time he is allowed to have his racquet over the net onto your side of the court is when he is following through on a stroke. If he is waving the racquet there while you are taking a stroke, you could call obstruction and say he was preventing you from following through on your stroke - and you get the point.
     
  10. chris-ccc

    chris-ccc Regular Member

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    What is an obstruction to a stroke?

    .
    Hi dolphin123,

    What was said by Winex West Can is correct.

    Strange enough, CCC Badminton went through explaining this rule yesterday at our MSAC Sunday session. It can be found at Post #222, located here.

    I will cut and paste the info for you, as shown below.

    ====== ====== start "SHOT" Vs "STROKE" ====== ======

    We need to define "SHOT" and "STROKE".
    SHOT = Flight of the shuttle.
    STROKE = Swing of the rackethead.

    You can block the SHOT, but you cannot block/obstruct the STROKE.

    If the shuttle is very close to the net, then there are 2 relevant laws here;
    (1) Your opponent must hit the shuttle with the point of impact on his/her side of the court.
    (2) Your opponent is allowed to have his/her racket head to follow through over the net into your side of the court.

    So, if your racket head is so close to the net that it prevented your opponent from doing the follow-through with his/her racket head over the net into your side of the court, then it is illegal.

    Usually the umpire makes the decision by judging whether the rackets will clash or not.

    My advice is... still block the shot, but block it further away from the net, so that no clashing of rackets can occur. It is then a LEGAL BLOCK of a SHOT. But it's easier said than done. :)

    BTW, please refer to these 2 threads located at:
    http://www.badmintoncentral.com/foru...ad.php?t=35128
    http://www.badmintoncentral.com/forums/showthread.php?t=50342

    ====== ====== end "SHOT" Vs "STROKE" ====== ======

    Cheers... chris@ccc
    :):):)
    .
     
    #10 chris-ccc, Apr 27, 2008
    Last edited: Apr 27, 2008
  11. llpjlau

    llpjlau Regular Member

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    difficult when you play without umpires though.
     
  12. Mr. Fault

    Mr. Fault Regular Member

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    Anticipation/ Deliberate Distraction; Shot & Stroke.

    It is perfectly within The Laws for a player to wave his/her racket in anticipation of a shot. Especially in the case given where it was in response to a drop the receiving player can place his racket as close to the net on his side as he dares.

    In this instance the shuttle must have been below the level of the top of the net and therefore there would not be case of the follow through from the striker being obstructed.

    If, on the otherhand, the shuttle is above the top level of the net the receiver must leave sufficient room for a follow through by the striker's racket regardless of whether the striker actually selects that shot option or not.

    Essentially, the closer the shuttle is to and above the net the further back the receiver must keep his racket, therefore allowing a full follow through.

    It is incorrect to say that a player can only intercept a shot after it has been hit. A player can do whatever he or she likes as long as they do not cause an obstruction (as above), a distraction or a delay.

    It is the umpire's decision as to whether a player is just playing their game or attempting to distract an opponent. An umpire is going to fault a player for shouting or some similar action which was clearly and without question a deliberate attempt to distract. If an umpire feels that the racket waving is an issue he/she is more likely to have a word with the player involved and to see where things go from there.

    Finally, the racket following over the net as part of a stroke in which the shuttle was hit is clearly ok and within the rules. A swish and miss and the racket going over the net as part of the follow through is, strictly speaking, a fault.

    In my interpretation though, if the umpire deems the attempt to have been a sincere one and not an effort to distract then they should not make a call and just let the game proceed.

    Consider for a moment though the scenario of a striker attempting to recover a drop from very close to the net. The receiver is allowed to have his racket ready, close to the top of the net just waiting for the shuttle to pop up and to be gratefully dispensed with. The striker, though, is entitled to follow through under the net with body or racket. The receiver, standing too close to where the shuttle is falling is causing an obstruction and this is a fault. So, you can obstruct with your feet and your racket!

    Mr. Fault
     
  13. LazyBuddy

    LazyBuddy Regular Member

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    During club level of playing, there are a lot of more gray areas than a formal tournament plays. Waving rackets in front of the net like this is commonly seen.

    If you don't feel confident about the shot (either worry about your body or racket being hit), let it go, as the game result is not that important. If you do want to make a shot, the safetest stroke (in return quality and safety), if a good net drop return. This way, it's harder for the opponent to make a return back, and if s/he swing the racket like a sword, s/he will likely hit the net, which is an obvious fault.
     

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