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What do the 2 letter country code on yonex rackets mean? (JP/SP/TW)

Discussion in 'Badminton Rackets / Equipment' started by kelvin1338, Dec 30, 2012.

  1. kelvin1338

    kelvin1338 Regular Member

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    I know what the codes stand for - Japan, Singapore and Taiwan. However...

    When I look on http://e78.com.hk/YYa.htm (Click on the badminton icon) they sell different rackets, each racket is available in different codes.

    For example, the JP Voltric 80 on e78 store costs $2100 whereas the Taiwan coded version cost $1290 which is almost half the price.

    What does the 2 letter country code mean? Why do the JP coded rackets generally cost so much more compared to SP and TW coded rackets?

    Most importantly, does the code affect the gameplay and quality of the racket?
     
  2. diverdan

    diverdan Regular Member

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    There's lots of info on this subject already on BC. Just type in country coding into the advanced search. There is no clear definitive answer though. I have used UK, BX, TWA coded rackets and they all seem good to me. There is a popular idea that JP means better quality but this hasn't been confirmed by the manufacturers. Collectors seem to prefer JP as well. Maybe you can investigate and send a letter to Yonex to find out?
     
  3. gundamzaku

    gundamzaku Regular Member

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    i live in the US so the only rackets i have access to is US coded. however, when i compare the rackets available online for order, it seemed that JP coded rackets have the smaller grip (G5) available. that's the only thing i see that's different between US and JP coded rackets online without inspecting them hands on.
     
  4. demolidor

    demolidor Regular Member

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    Like I already said they are market designations and the price difference is caused by the price the shop can acquire them for from the respective distributors (in which exchange rate is also a factor, in particular for TW vs SP. Still remember SP being the cheaper ones and for a while they were also on par). Japan being another high price market, it is "what can you ask for it" rather than "what did it cost to make".
     
    #4 demolidor, Dec 30, 2012
    Last edited: Dec 30, 2012
  5. diverdan

    diverdan Regular Member

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    I thought the codes were for distribution purposes? An SP racket is supposed to be sold in Singapore etc. There are 2 Yonex factories though so quality may very from factory to factory.
     
  6. demolidor

    demolidor Regular Member

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    In principal yes but import rules varying from country to country might make it illegal to forbid parallel import of other codes. Probably the case in Hong Kong ... I remember at some point even GR code was for sale there :D.
     
  7. Cheung

    Cheung Moderator

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    yes. Some people are prepared to pay more for parallel import and 'novelty' value.

    We have had this same topic answered in another thread created by the OP. I am not sure why the same question again in another thread.

    I'd just repeat be wary about fake racquets about buying off amazon/eBay especially if from China.
     
  8. cobalt

    cobalt Moderator

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    All genuine Yonex racquets have 2 sets of laser-etched serial numbers: one on the shaft, the other on the cone.

    The shaft has 7 digits.
    Example: 9311721
    This number is supposed to be unique for each racquet.

    The cone code consists of 6 numerals + 2 alphabets
    Example: 100431JP
    The first 5 numerals indicate the date of manufacture of the racquet. In the above example, the racquet was manufactured on April 10, 2003. Like many others, I don't know what the last digit signifies. Perhaps a batch number?

    The 2 alphabets provide the Distribution Code. The Distribution Code is an abbreviation for the country (or the market) the racquet is officially designated for.

    Here are the Distribution Codes:

    AS: Australia
    BX: Belgium/Netherlands
    CD: Canada
    CH: China
    CN/CP: Chinese National Team
    DK: Denmark
    FR: France
    GR: Germany
    HK: Hong Kong
    ID: India
    IN:Indonesia
    IP: International Player (allegedly)
    JP:Japan
    KR: Korea
    MA: Malaysia
    NZ: New Zealand
    SD: Sweden
    SP: South Pacific (other SEA countries?)
    TH: Thailand
    TW: Taiwan
    UK: United Kingdom
    US: USA

    As you might expect, there is no clear indication from Yonex that any differences exist in quality between the same brand of racquet, but with different country codes. However, many advanced and competitive players have insisted that they have experienced a distinct difference between say, the heaviness or stiffness or playability or even the finish of say, a AT700 3UG5 with a JP code and a AT700 3UG5 with say, a US code. Some people feel this is because the quality control for JP codes of racquets made in Japan are much more stringent and that it qualifies Yonex to have these products (JP/Made in Japan) endorsed with a special seal.

    It is also interesting to note that all the higher-end products of each brand line (e.g. Arc10, Arc7, Arc8DX, Arc-ZS of the Arcsaber line) are manufactured in Yonex's Japan production facilities (Niigata?) whereas the mid- and lower-end products (e.g. Arc002, Arc008) are manufactured by their/other factories in China, Taiwan etc.

    Yonex also has a digitally mastered holograph sticker to be found on all the "high-end" racquets that cannot be easily peeled off. I'm not sure if this "security feature" is also found on the lower-end racquets as well. The holograph is supposed to do some weird things when scanned by a special verification thingie that Yonex provides to it's authorised distributors/retailers.
     
  9. cobalt

    cobalt Moderator

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    Too late to edit the above, but the "holograph verification thingie" does have a name. It's called an "authenticator." There's a thread lurking somewhere here about it...
     
  10. SteveLJW

    SteveLJW Regular Member

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    Here's the thread on the authenticator: http://www.badmintoncentral.com/for...2-Yonex-Authenticator?highlight=authenticator

    I don't have the chance to test out a JP coded racket. Is there a noticeable difference in handling/feel compared to their SP coded counterparts?
     
  11. demolidor

    demolidor Regular Member

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    It (JP) makes your wallet lighter so you can move around the court quicker [​IMG][​IMG]
     
  12. not a real user

    not a real user Regular Member

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    Maybe, but not that noticeable, however some strings hv differences in JP and SP, NBG98 has a better feel in JP compared to SP, and different strings are labelled differently, and so on and so forth. However owning a JP racket will enable you to show off to your fellow badminton enthusiasts :p
     
  13. drifit

    drifit Moderator

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    Apple's stuff is Made in China. millions queue up days just to grab iphone.
    can i say Apple stuff is rubbish just because it is manufactured not in USA?

    codes are just being distribution codes. they are same in quality.
     
  14. SteveLJW

    SteveLJW Regular Member

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    I think a pair of SHB-F1LTD will help better. :)

    Oh? I didn't know strings have distribution codes as well. Where are they printed on the packaging? I only remember seeing Made In Japan for most of them.

    Ya fair enough. Just curious why the JP models are being sold at a much higher price.
     
  15. diverdan

    diverdan Regular Member

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  16. demolidor

    demolidor Regular Member

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    The silly thing about this JP myth is that they are always compared to SP codes in terms of price but in the same while rackets with German codes are barely more expensive than SP if at all and probably cheaper even after taking off the VAT. That would mean rackets for the German market would be the crappiest quality? G-E-R-M-A-N-Y: home of quality brands/goods ...
    Now rackets in Switzerland are pretty expensive in comparison but I don't notice a difference between SW, GR and BX for instance, yet Swiss ones are substantially more expensive even with a much lower VAT. Surprise, surprise: everything is (more) expensive in Switzerland (well except petrol and certain watches :cool:).
    But like I and some others have suggested in the past, it wouldn't be too far fetched to picture some post-production grading and selection in finishing for the home market ...
     
    #16 demolidor, Jan 1, 2013
    Last edited: Jan 1, 2013
  17. demolidor

    demolidor Regular Member

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  18. DanGoh

    DanGoh Regular Member

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    Just a comment. You can also see this price difference (Japan and non-Japan made) in Action figures.
    Japan-made figures also commanded a much higher premium than its International or Non-Japan made figures. To a non-collector, both figures look exactly and feel the same although collectors invariably go for the Japan-made figures because they command a higher/better resale value later on.


    I am not too sure if the materials used for both versions are the same but one perception is that Japan-made products have higher QC. Hence, the end product quality is of a higher percentage in comparison to those products with defects, etc. This account for the expectation that Japan-made products are of a "higher" quality.
     
  19. demolidor

    demolidor Regular Member

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    The difference here being all rackets concerned are Japan made ;) ...
    For the brief time I've looked into say, Transformer re-issues of late, the Japan made are a different brand and use different materials ... Same for model kits or at least they are different brands. But maybe you have some examples of one brand with Japan made vs non-Japan made toys. In the case for rackets it is like a Sony tv for the Japan market being better than one for Germany or Singapore because the firmware letter is different?? Or a Casio watch with different code because the manual is a different language ...
    But I do agree this fact of high quality Japanese products translates into perception of other products as well, especially when the consumer knowledge is lacking.
     
    #19 demolidor, Jan 2, 2013
    Last edited: Jan 2, 2013
  20. drifit

    drifit Moderator

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    just wonder.
    do you have the selling price of McD or KFC or Starbucks around the globe?
    i do believe KFC taste better in Malaysia. especially the Johor Bahru outlet. :D
     

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