Thanks for visiting us!

Badminton Central is a free community for fans of badminton! If you find anything useful here please consider registering to see more content and get involved with our great community users, it takes less than 15 seconds! Everybody is welcome here.

Click here for a FREE account!

When do you change your strings?

Discussion in 'Badminton String' started by ALI, Nov 16, 2002.

  1. ALI

    ALI Regular Member

    Joined:
    Apr 28, 2002
    Messages:
    75
    Likes Received:
    0
    Occupation:
    Student
    Location:
    Malaysia
    Hi. I play using a Ti10 and BG68Ti strings at 22lbs. I don't play that often, I normally just play once a week for 2 hours. Because of that, my string normally lasts for at least 6 months.

    Recently, I broke my string and restringed it. Wow, the new string just feels so powerful. The sound is so nice and it's really repulsive.

    Now, the question: for a user like me whose string only breaks after such a long time, do you cut the string before it breaks? And when's the best time to cut the string?

    There is a doubt on me when to cut the string: How am I that sure that I start to lose power because of the string, not because it's one of my bad days in badminton?

    I don't mind to cut the string eventhough the string might be expensive. I'm willing to sacrifice a little bit to get the best out of badminton.

    And, do pros cut their string frequently??? Or do they restring only after their strings break?
     
  2. LazyBuddy

    LazyBuddy Regular Member

    Joined:
    May 20, 2002
    Messages:
    10,222
    Likes Received:
    13
    Occupation:
    Engineer
    Location:
    New York, US
    I believe "change string"depend on various factors, here are my list:

    1. string broken (what else u can do?)

    2. string loose (depend on what kinda string, how good the string was strung, how hard u hit, how often u use, etc)

    3. string dead (how long u been use this string, did u take proper care about string (I mean, don't put racket in trunk in cold weather all the time, etc))

    4. try out some other model (u need to have a little bit $$$, probably someone with "cheap labor" to do the job for u)

    5. find out string not fit for the racket, change it (while, better change it, since the model does not really fit for ur racket. get several $, and pray for the better next time)
     
  3. ^shaz^

    ^shaz^ Regular Member

    Joined:
    Apr 26, 2002
    Messages:
    168
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Scotland
    I normally can tell when my strings need changing as i feel the impact off the shuttle become less solid and more "bouncy" which shows that strings are losing tension...

    Also u can sometimes see strings fray a bit which shows wear and tear and might be time to change...

    I seem to have the worst luck with breaking strings tho...

    3 times i broke my strings bang in the middle of the rackets (RIGHT In the middle) doing the same shot (jump smash) lol.... "touch wood" hasnt happened for a while tho :)

    As u said tho if u dont play that regularly u might not be able to notice the deterioration in ur strings as much as those who play 3-4 times a week.
     
  4. Californian

    Californian Regular Member

    Joined:
    Jun 7, 2002
    Messages:
    554
    Likes Received:
    1
    Location:
    Southern California
    If you're cheap or poor or both (like me), you finally get new string after you have so many patch jobs that you don't have any open places left to tie off the next patch.
     
  5. bigredlemon

    bigredlemon Regular Member

    Joined:
    Sep 28, 2002
    Messages:
    2,096
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    T.O.
    I have no idea what a patch job is but it sounds funny for some reason (LOL!) I'm imagining you put a bicycle tire patch on your racquet :p
     
  6. ^shaz^

    ^shaz^ Regular Member

    Joined:
    Apr 26, 2002
    Messages:
    168
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Scotland
    If im right then patch job = just replacing the broken strings rather then a full restring...

    So he has knots all over his racket as he jus keeps replacing broken strings rather then full restring which would give you 2 or 4 knots dep on how u get it strung :)
     
  7. Californian

    Californian Regular Member

    Joined:
    Jun 7, 2002
    Messages:
    554
    Likes Received:
    1
    Location:
    Southern California
    From what kwan said in the other broken string post, it looks like this new generation of players who get their rackets strung at 25+ lbs. don't use patches.

    Shaz is correct. You pull out the loose ends and tie them off, then weave a replacement string where the broken one was and tie it off. You use special tools for this work.

    The grommet holes are only large enough for two strings to go through, so if you keep patching broken strings, what eventually happens is that you have knots at virtually every grommet hole so and you have no place to put a new one without running the string along the frame past several holes. Or, the string you tied your knot around breaks, so you have do undo other patch jobs to replace that string.
     
  8. ^shaz^

    ^shaz^ Regular Member

    Joined:
    Apr 26, 2002
    Messages:
    168
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Scotland
    I cant play very well with lower tensions anymore it seems, my MP99 is at 25lbs and still holding tension v well, but i had a hit with my ti10 and that is probably at 20-21 lbs and felt too bouncy and no control lol... and using patches is risky there cos to retain the high tensions you cant use patches, and also i take strings straight off when they break as i dont want the frame to be warped or damaged.
     
  9. ronk

    ronk Regular Member

    Joined:
    Sep 10, 2002
    Messages:
    1,252
    Likes Received:
    23
    Location:
    USA
    I used to repair the broken strings as oppose to restringing the entire racket, when I was using my wooden racket and was poor (still in school then). Anyway, it is very expensive to restring rackets in the US if there is no local stringing service. Shipping and handling can cost more than the entire stringing service so restringing a racket with shipping and handing will cost US$30 to $45. I can understand why Californian repairs the racket, but unless the tension is low, this can result in cracks in the frame and lousy feel because of the uneven tension.

    Anyway, one gets used to the lower tension as the racket tension decreases and it is not all that critical. When comparing a newly strung racket with a racket that was strung a while back, one notices the differences immediately.

    Ron
     
  10. ^shaz^

    ^shaz^ Regular Member

    Joined:
    Apr 26, 2002
    Messages:
    168
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Scotland
    Yep totally, if like me, you are used to high tensions (and even restring racket when strings are fine but tension has dropped below ur norm [considering gettin those to-10's restrung now lol]) then yeah you do notice the difference in tensions etc etc, but if u normally do repair the strings and the resulting drop in tension then you will be used to it i guess and it doesnt pose a problem...
     
  11. bigredlemon

    bigredlemon Regular Member

    Joined:
    Sep 28, 2002
    Messages:
    2,096
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    T.O.
    Wow that is expensive... I guess i'm lucky to be in a big city... can get my racquet strung with bg85 for $30 CAD. Actually, $45 USD converted to CAD is $72... so the price to get yours restrung is almost the price of my racquet! Ouch, that is expensive:eek:
     
    #11 bigredlemon, Nov 17, 2002
    Last edited: Nov 17, 2002
  12. jwu

    jwu Regular Member

    Joined:
    Sep 12, 2002
    Messages:
    808
    Likes Received:
    0
    Occupation:
    Medical Research
    Location:
    boston, ma, US
    You can change your strings whenever you like, just depends on your wallet size. Usually after a few "off" days and feeling that the feel of the string is gone, I'd change it. It's a little easier for me since I string myself so it's just the string cost for me. Another thing I do is I try to get the colored string so you can notice the wear and tear on the string easier than the white strings. When you start to see more "scars" on your strings then you'd like, it's time to change.
     
  13. ronk

    ronk Regular Member

    Joined:
    Sep 10, 2002
    Messages:
    1,252
    Likes Received:
    23
    Location:
    USA
    If you can restring the racket yourself or if there are competent stringers in the area, then restringing on a regular basis makes sense. I do not have access to a local stringer and will have to send my racket off to be restrung. Shipping and handling will run about $20+ and stringing may run from $15 upwards. I will pass on restringing my rackets on a regular basis until I have my own stringing machine.

    Ron
     
  14. jwu

    jwu Regular Member

    Joined:
    Sep 12, 2002
    Messages:
    808
    Likes Received:
    0
    Occupation:
    Medical Research
    Location:
    boston, ma, US
    Get a string machine

    Just think about all the restringing cost and figure that into how much a string machine cost. You can get a machine as cheap as $90 from Eagnas or up to $300 USD and still get a decent string machine that's fit for personal use. I bought my machine from www.klipperusa.com and the model type is the M140. After shipping it comes to $160 USD. I've own the machine around 2 months now and I've done something like 50 racquet stringing job by now. Figure about $12 each string job, that's $600 USD I just made. Minus the machine, minus the string cost, that's still $200 USD profit there. If you just do stringing for yourself, a machine like the M140 would earn its worth after 4-5 stringing job at the rate ronk and other people are paying for their string jobs. So if you have no competent stringer around you, you could be that new competent stringer. :D
     
  15. LazyBuddy

    LazyBuddy Regular Member

    Joined:
    May 20, 2002
    Messages:
    10,222
    Likes Received:
    13
    Occupation:
    Engineer
    Location:
    New York, US
    Re: Get a string machine


    Nah... If there really no others can do string, u will be the monopoly, and start to charge ppl like $25+

    :D ;) :p
     
  16. jwu

    jwu Regular Member

    Joined:
    Sep 12, 2002
    Messages:
    808
    Likes Received:
    0
    Occupation:
    Medical Research
    Location:
    boston, ma, US
    Re: Re: Get a string machine

    well you could if you want, then ppl will stop going to you and get their own string machine. :D
     
  17. kwun

    kwun Administrator

    Joined:
    Apr 24, 2002
    Messages:
    39,282
    Likes Received:
    550
    Occupation:
    BC Janitor
    Location:
    Santa Clara, CA, USA
    and be prepared that people in your gym will look at you like you are a freak, "you *OWN* a stringing machine?!?!?" i got that a lot. ;)
     
  18. jwu

    jwu Regular Member

    Joined:
    Sep 12, 2002
    Messages:
    808
    Likes Received:
    0
    Occupation:
    Medical Research
    Location:
    boston, ma, US
    I think that comes from the idea that most people think the only machine out there are those $800 or $1k+ heavy duty stand-up stringer. :D Most people were shocked when I told them how much my machine cost. As for credibility, luckily I got the attention of some of the better players at the club first and did a good job on their stringing so they made me look good. :D
     
  19. bigredlemon

    bigredlemon Regular Member

    Joined:
    Sep 28, 2002
    Messages:
    2,096
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    T.O.
    There must be alot of stringers in Boston though, right?
    Cuz TO has at least two respected stringers and dozens and dozens more lesser known ones. Even our general (mega) sports stores have a staff of stringers.
     
  20. Pecheur

    Pecheur Regular Member

    Joined:
    Apr 27, 2002
    Messages:
    704
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Australia
    Erm Kwun

    You ARE a freak ;)
     

Share This Page