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Why do professionals stand so close to the service line?

Discussion in 'Techniques / Training' started by Jason123, Mar 14, 2012.

  1. Jason123

    Jason123 Regular Member

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    This is what happens
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Wdlw9cK1UXA

    w
    hy do they serve it low 90% of the time, they always get attacked,

    wouldnt it be a better technique to stand further away so you can clear it more effectively
     
  2. LD rules!

    LD rules! Regular Member

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    Cause the whole point of a flick serve is to catch your opponent off guard, if you flicked every second serve it would be predictable, and this sort of video wouldn't exist.

    Professionals are quick enough to he back to these serves, even amateurs can get back and still stand at the line.
     
  3. Jason123

    Jason123 Regular Member

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    Judging by this video obviously not
     
  4. |_Footwork_|

    |_Footwork_| Regular Member

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    well, flicking only works if you do it VERY unfrequently. this video is a collection of these very seldom events... usually, the flick just gets smashed. believe it or not: from a certain leve l onwards, it is more efficient to stand as far front as possible, always serve short and very unfrequently flick. seems counterintuitive for weaker players, still it's a fact...
     
  5. sautom88

    sautom88 Regular Member

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    Why? The pros in doubles always try to 'force' their opponents to lift the shuttle, so as the receivers they will push/net a short serve. To do that as quick as possible they stand close to front, but not too close that they cannot jump backward to smash a flick serve.

    For the servers they also stay close to the service line so the time needed to get across the net is shorter, thus giving the receiver less time to react to the short serves.
     
  6. Tactim

    Tactim Regular Member

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    Part of the fault with this logic is because this video takes 15-20 or so points from several matches that span hundreds of points played. Just because you see a compilation of all the times pro's are deceived by the flick serve does not mean it is effective all the time. Think of it this way, I could create a compilation of all the flick serves that failed and were smashed for a winner. Thus you would that the flick serve really should never be done because all it does is that it gives the opponent a for smash. All in all, it's what others have been saying. Flick serves are used in crucial moments where your opponents are more susceptible to deception and when they least expect it. If you use the serve too often, your opponents will be ready for the serve and most likely your flick will be smashed.

    However at the club level where people's footwork is not as fast as professionals, flicking tends to be more effective. In addition, many club players are aware of this and thus stand about 2-4 feet behind the service line to cover the flick serve. This most often results in a lift on low serves because they take the shuttle so low and thus give away the attack.

    So regarding a player's awareness level and skill, they stand in different places in the court when receiving the serve
     
    #6 Tactim, Mar 15, 2012
    Last edited: Mar 15, 2012
  7. Tadashi

    Tadashi Regular Member

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    the flick is pretty risky -- it earns your team a smash, the service judge probably calls it a fault and even if you're that cool, you're not going to be in an attack position after the return. So if I know that you know that I know that you know these facts ... well, then strike out the possibility of a flick and expect a low serve to come ...
     
  8. Jason123

    Jason123 Regular Member

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    Dont have a clie what you said after the second sentence
     
  9. Nauroa

    Nauroa Regular Member

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    This video proves absolutely nothing. It would be piece of cake to make a video of all the times flick serves goes wrong as well.

    Faults are very often called on flick serves. Hell even the video holds service faults that are called.

    If you look at a general doubles match in a tournament I'd say there is more flick serves going bad than good.
     
  10. Staiger1

    Staiger1 Regular Member

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    Forget about what the professional does or do ! you do whatever you want on court to get you the win
     

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