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Yellow Card for not shaking hands

Discussion in 'Rules / Tournament Regulation / Officiating' started by pcll99, Feb 15, 2012.

  1. lcleing

    lcleing Regular Member

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    Wow, tell me more about it. So celebrating massively, doing a strip tease while ignoring the presence of your opponent is a way of respecting your opponent according to you. Wow, just wow.

    I think the newer generations is slowly forgetting about what it means to be a good chap- to be able to control one's emotion and being considerate.Looks like we believe in very different things. Let's just agree to disagree.
     
  2. Heong

    Heong Regular Member

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    Not a good rule

    Players shouldn't be forced to shake hands, but shake hands because they sincerely want to and think it was a fair and great game. A enforced shake and a genuine shake might look the same, but completely different in meaning

    Otherwise, people would just think "they are only shaking hands, because they have to"

    It's crazy. And now the 'goodies' who actually sincerely shake their opponents hands... people would think they're only doing it, because of the rule

    And then, we will have a sport when people cannot tell whether they actually have good sportsmanship or not. Sportsmanship should not be determined by the handshake in itself...
    Players should be able to decide for themselves whether they want to shake hands or not and really depends on their discipline to do so... if they not disciplined, nothing can be done about it, they are how they are brought up and we have to accept that some people are different
     
    #42 Heong, Mar 28, 2012
    Last edited: Mar 28, 2012
  3. tobradex

    tobradex Regular Member

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    Why is everyone saying they are being forced?

    Encouraged, sure, but it's not like they'll never let you back to the sport or beat you senseless if you don't shake hands? Just a little (for the pros anyway) fine and some yellow piece of paper no?

    I bet many will still ignore this in the heat of the moment.
     
  4. StefanDO

    StefanDO Regular Member

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    I also think shaking hands should be genuine - and therefore not forced by any rule. If a player decides not to shake hands (or is celebrating for too long while the opponent is waiting for handshake at the net), I think his/her reputation will suffer from it. This can be some kind of punishment already. Unfortunately, those who don't show sportsmanship, they may also be the ones who don't care much about their image/reputation... But as long as spectators decide not to be a fan of a certain player because of lack of sportsmanship (no matter how skillful), it's better than nothing I guess. This just brought me to the idea of implementing spectators' ratings to the points players got in the world ranking. :-D Not being too serious here... :)
     
  5. craigandy

    craigandy Regular Member

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    Just got round to watching MS final at Singapore open and have the perfect example for all you "traditionalists".
    Ponsana took the title and directly after winning final point ran off court to coaches. Ponsana a good player but had fell out of top 30 and had been performing poorly but came through to win the Singapore open. You could see his move to celebrate with coaches was completely genuine. You can also not dispute that this guy is very respectful and in no way meant to cause any disrespect. His coaches even pointed him back to the net after a small embrace. If you watch this i believe you may change your opinions on this rule.
     
  6. visor

    visor Regular Member

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    Now that this is brought up, I've also noticed that in the past few months many coaches have been pointing their victorious players back to the court to shake hands with their opponents when the winners come off court to celebrate their win.

    Must be because of this new rule. ;)
     
  7. chris-ccc

    chris-ccc Regular Member

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    Without opponent, there shall be no match

    .
    I am sorry that I still disagree. :eek::eek::eek:

    Without opponent, there shall be no match.

    Therefore, it is important to thank our opponent first.

    IMHO, it is the proper etiquette.
    .
     
  8. 2wheels04

    2wheels04 Regular Member

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    If they were playing football (soccer?), then yes, per the laws, they would be booked and shown yellow card, even after the match's final whistle. Why? I hear you ask. The idea behind the booking is that the player is drawing attention to himself more, as the focus should be on the game, not the player.

    A referee in football will show the yellow card to such a player after the final whistle as long as s/he is still on the pitch. Badminton has no such law to enforce, or guideline(s) to follow.
     
  9. V1lau

    V1lau Regular Member

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    Why doesn't the BWF just communicate to the national teams and players what is expected of them first, then see if they need to create a law if the players fail to meet their expectation. I think the players will alter their celebration once someone has told them what is expected.
     
  10. 2wheels04

    2wheels04 Regular Member

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    Player's Code of Conduct

    This has already been done, see the Player's Code of Conduct document on BWF's website.

    When a player does not shake hands with opponent(s) or with the umpire/service judge, this would be non-compliance of goodwill formalities, for which there is a specific fine of 100 US$ per incident (see Appendix 11 of the laws-handbook).

    Player's On-site Offences
    4.1.2
    Before, during and after any match does not comply with the goodwill formalities such as thanking TOs, shaking hand with opposing players, etc. Players must thank their opponents and Umpire before leaving the field of play to celebrate with their Coach or the crowd.

    Now, here is the critical part - when a player has not shaken hands with opponent(s) or with the umpire/service judge, this fact would either be reported on the umpire score-sheet or directly into the referee report is s/he has seen this "gesture." We, on the outside, are not privy to this referee report, nor do we know if the umpire on that court reported this incident on the score-sheet. BWF, however, does have a Disciplinary Action section on their website; the latest ones are from circa 2009.
     
    #50 2wheels04, Jul 6, 2012
    Last edited: Jul 6, 2012
  11. V1lau

    V1lau Regular Member

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    Thanks for the info and shame on the BWF for seemingly not enforcing their own rule. Im not a fan of doing a celebration or grabbing your coach before shaking your opponents hand.
     
  12. visor

    visor Regular Member

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    Only $100 fine per incident? That's like $50 per player in doubles... so go ahead and deduct $100 from me and my partner's Premier event $30,000 winner's cheque! I don't mind celebrating with my coaches first. :p ;)
     
  13. SantaSCSI

    SantaSCSI Regular Member

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    Sometimes fines are there to create awareness, not to create bankruptcy.
     
  14. LD rules!

    LD rules! Regular Member

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    If I'm honest, I'm not sure which rule is more ridiculous, this one, or the one that states its compulsory to have your name on the back of your shirt if you are playing in the main draw of a international challenge tournament of higher. Otherwise there is a fine imposed.

    This rule is stupid though, it's unclear and stupid. It says you can't celebrate with your coaches first (which is stupid in the first place) but then it doesn't make it clear whether you can celebrate with the crowd before hand (note it says coaches not spectators) so this rule is totally open to interpretation.

    Still you win the match, you can celebrate. In my opinion if you win a big match in a tournament it's okay to celebrate and thank your coaches/support first. You don't have to shake hands with your opponent in clear view of everyone...
     
  15. V1lau

    V1lau Regular Member

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    I agreed with you till I saw the Chen Long's celebration, which in my opinion was so over the top and disrespectful that I was glad when I saw LCW didn't want to shake his hand. Because of that incident, I've never really been a big fan of his.

    I understand the desire to celebrate after a big victory, but i think it's important to balance that with a level of respect to your opponent, who probably just wants to get off the court after a big loss and not stand there waiting for the winner.
     
  16. pcll99

    pcll99 Regular Member

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  17. craigandy

    craigandy Regular Member

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    I really enjoyed the emotions and celebrations after the Olympic men's singles final, Seemed completely genuine and fitting to the occasion, I wouldn't have wanted it any other way. Occasions like this are good for the sport and i can't fathom where the disrespect to your opponent comes into it or how it is disrespectful. Prime example why BWF should not discourage this.
     

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