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Yonex Racquet Series Specific Characteristics

Discussion in 'Racket Recommendation / Comparison' started by cyclone9, Mar 11, 2009.

  1. cyclone9

    cyclone9 Regular Member

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    Hi,

    I wan to find out all Yonex series racquet on their own specification:

    Carbonex - All-around?
    Armortec - Heavy-Head
    Titanium - Stiff shaft
    Nanospeed - ??
    ArcSaber - ??
    Muscle Power - ??

    Correct me if im wrong
     
  2. Destricto_Ense

    Destricto_Ense Regular Member

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    Because the Yonex series generally include several racquets, one can never be too specific about all the common characteristics of all the racquets a series.

    If you look at the chart in this file here - http://www.yonexusa.com/images/badminton/badminton2_specs.pdf

    You can see some of the trends. Each series is clumped together, but still reasonably spread out. I guess it's a good thing, Yonex have almost all of the chart covered so you have variety from which to choose what suits you best.
     
  3. cyclone9

    cyclone9 Regular Member

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    no titanium chart/spec?:D
     
  4. Destricto_Ense

    Destricto_Ense Regular Member

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    I think the Ti racquets are only sold in Japan, so they wouldn't be on the USA site. I don't know anything about that series I'm afraid.
     
  5. jymbalaya

    jymbalaya Regular Member

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    Ti rackets are sold In the SP area as well.
    Carbonex's are not too common in the US either, Proshop wise.
     
  6. drifit

    drifit Moderator

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    Carbonex - All-around? -for oval head lovers
    Armortec - Heavy-Head -more on attacking
    Titanium - overall performance?
    Nanospeed - headlight(even balance). better maneuverability.
    ArcSaber - new profile. mix from armortec and nanospeed series.
    Muscle Power - more for attacking. now being replace with armortec series.
     
  7. jymbalaya

    jymbalaya Regular Member

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    Promoted Sir?

    I think Ti's are all about stiffness, IMO.
    and The Arcsabers are more all around for me as well.
     
  8. drifit

    drifit Moderator

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    laughing at me...? :(

    i have easier time to flex the ti-10 than my at900T.
    i dont know what is in the mind of yonex's engineers. arcsabers, indeed is more all rounders. same to ti-10, some extra punch of power from the racket. maybe this is the replacement to titanium series in mind.
     
  9. Athelete1234

    Athelete1234 Regular Member

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    Carbonex: Oval head, all around performance
    Armortec - heavy head
    Titanium - All around - offensive (Ti7, Ti6 not really stiff, only Ti10)
    Nanospeed - head light
    Arcsaber - flexible frame, even balance
    Muscle power - even balance

    You'll find that most of the time the 6XXX racquets are more defensive: examples NS6000, AT600, MP66/60, Ti6.
     
  10. jymbalaya

    jymbalaya Regular Member

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    Respecting you, sir.

    I think that the Arcsabers are more replacements for the MP's. The ARC10 feels like a Watered-down MP100 to me. Of course, I loved MP's. Therefore, this is all subjective.
     
  11. Oldhand

    Oldhand Moderator

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    Mumbo-Jumbo

    The problem with assigning characteristics is that they simply aren't based on user logic. Rather, it appears, they follow marketing logic - and Yonex is indeed fantastically clever about it all.

    It then happens that users modify the racquet of choice to resemble what they are looking for. And this is hardly a new practice :)

    For instance, one buys a headlight racquet and then applies lead tape to the head - or one buys a head-heavy racquet and then wraps a heavy grip on the handle - or one buys a racquet with an even-balance and then chokes up on the handle.

    If this isn't deliberate customisation, what is?

    In terms of actual use, the whole imbroglio goes much further.

    There are those that swear by 'singles racquet', 'doubles racquet', 'attacking racquet', 'defensive racquet' and other better or worse, humanised or impersonal improbabilities.

    For instance, circa 2004, Lin Dan was using the MP-99. So was Jonas Rasmussen. So, what does that make the racquet? A singles racquet or a doubles racquet? (The glib-tongued would say: "Oh, that's an all-round racquet." Gee, that's oh-so convenient.)

    Using a few examples, let's apply this view to the OP's listing:

    Armortec series
    Singles - Lee Chong Wei, Lin Dan, Wang Yihan, Hafiz Hashim / Doubles - Cai Yun, Markis Kido, Yu Yang

    Titanium series
    Singles - Wong Choong Hann, P Kashyap / Doubles - Fu Haifeng, Koo Kien Keat, Tan Boon Heong

    Nanospeed series
    Singles - Kendrick Lee, Xie Xingfang, Park Sung-hwan / Doubles - Jens Eriksen, Thomas Laybourn

    ArcSaber series
    Singles - Taufik Hidayat, Peter Gade, Bao Chunlai, Chen Jin, Saina Nehwal / Doubles - Hendra Setiawan, Lee Yong-dae, Gao Ling

    Muscle Power & Carbonex series
    Close to professional obsolescence
    At its prime, the Cab series was in use by all types of pros - Wong Choong Hann still packs it - (other known users include one kwun and one Cheung) - the 'all-but-professionally-expired' pair of Reiko Shiota & Kumiko Ogura was using the MP series

    Clearly, any racquet is anything you want it to be - attacking, defensive, singles, doubles (or just ornamental) ;)

    In short, racquet specifications are more what they finally are in the user's hand during play. They are merely the sum of whatever useful and not-so-useful modifications have been made to the factory piece :)
     
  12. wristworks

    wristworks Regular Member

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    This is true, but there *are* actual physical properties of racquets that make them better suited for certain styles of play. If you take personal modifications out of the picture, the Armortec series are 4U and head heavy. So that tells you something about the racquets. Nanospeeds tend to be 3U but head light. If you find that you're driving a lot during your game, then mayhaps a Nanospeed would be better whereas if you're smashing a lot, then you might want to look at an Armortec.

    All in all, I think you have to look deliberately at your style of play, regardless of which professional players use what. Properties like balance point, weight, and stiffness all contribute. Personally, I wouldn't look at the "series" or "number" when choosing a racquet. They're all good racquets. Your playing style will determine the type of racquet you want and once you know that, then you look for the racquet that fits in with those properties. The MP 77 is more similar to the Arc 10 than it is to the MP 88.
     

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