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Thread: odd stroke

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    Default odd stroke

    I don't know if something like this has been talked about in the past, I tried to do a search but wasn't sure what to look for. So far I've only seen 2 guys use this stroke and they both have powerful smashes. I'm talking about instead of having the racquet head up before hitting an overhead stroke (like what you mostly see in books) they hold the racquet low (waist level) almost parallel to the floor with their racquet arm relaxed (dangling it seems). Everything else onward is the same, I guess the only difference between their stroke and the "standard" one is the starting position. Technically this might give them more power in that they are able to have a wider startup swing although it might take longer i.e. delay from startup swing to impact. What do you guys think, should I spend more time looking into it or is it just bad habit that I should avoid?

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    That seems kinda advanced for me. Mabe they just made it up.

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    having the racket arm up and racket head pointing forward and up is what i'd call the "standard" preparation stance. if you check out the videos of Xia, Bao CL, you will find the standard stroke displayed.

    from my personal experience, it is not neccessary to have the standard stance to execute a good stroke to hit the birdie, however, the standard stance helps. it is the most natural stance to start from in order to rotate the arm body forward. this is especially important during the learning stage, or when you are trying to correct your stroke.

    on the other hand, i am not saying it is not possible to execute a good stroke without the standard stance, it is definitely possible, just that the standard stance is most efficient makes it easier. starting from a non-standard stance can potentially steer you away from the good execution of the stroke.

    it is actually quite important. with my own experimentation, i realized that my shots are much more effortless if i do pay attention to raise my arm high up.

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    although it might take longer i.e. delay from startup swing to impact
    I think that is true.
    It might be that they have never been put under enough pressure to need to prepare early.

    For me, your arm goes up in preparation as soon as possible.
    Even if someone plays a drop shot to you, you prepare your racquet to play a net kill if there's the smallest chance you can play a kill. If you approach the net with your racquet prepared for a net shot or lob your opponent knows you are not going to try a kill and it takes some pressure off him. If you always approach with prepared to play a kill your opponent has more things to worry about. It is easier to play a net shot or lift having approched prepared to kill than it is the other way round.

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    Originally posted by kwun
    having the racket arm up and racket head pointing forward and up is what i'd call the "standard" preparation stance. if you check out the videos of Xia, Bao CL, you will find the standard stroke displayed.

    from my personal experience, it is not neccessary to have the standard stance to execute a good stroke to hit the birdie, however, the standard stance helps. it is the most natural stance to start from in order to rotate the arm body forward. this is especially important during the learning stage, or when you are trying to correct your stroke.

    on the other hand, i am not saying it is not possible to execute a good stroke without the standard stance, it is definitely possible, just that the standard stance is most efficient makes it easier. starting from a non-standard stance can potentially steer you away from the good execution of the stroke.

    it is actually quite important. with my own experimentation, i realized that my shots are much more effortless if i do pay attention to raise my arm high up.
    Could be something back from 20 years ago, Han Jian used to hit as described.

    Try hitting a shuttle with a racquet from 20 years ago with hand held high and it

    will be obvious.

    Racquets are so powerful nowadays, the priority in most cases is to contorl it

    rather than overhit it.

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    Mmmmmmm... That really depends. If you can play well with it, go for it. Not everyone uses the standard technique. I started developping this technique where I hold the top part of the frame when I clear to use more wrist, and to get rid of this weird bad habit I developped where I slice the bird. My power is in my wrist so yeh. But that technique isn't permenant. Alot of the times I switch back to standard if I'm clearing from the baseline.

    Yodums

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    Actually these guys I mentionned did not always start their stroke from the position described, I know for a fact that one of them keeps his racquet low before executing a smash (practice smash--one guy lobs while the other smashes), I'm not entirely sure whether he still does this while playing a game that is while executing a smash. I know that he keeps his racquet up while receiving a serve and when playing in the forecourt or while executing fast drops, half-smashes, etc., anything fast. But while rallying casually (not a game) I've noticed that he usually plays with his racquet low, looks as if he's taking it easy so I definitely agree that his starting position is somehow influenced by the amount of pressure he's in yet his in-game smashes are just as powerful. I cannot discount his unorthodox starting position as just bad habit because he does have a very powerful smash (you know how good players all have pretty hard smashes but his smash is just one of those exceptionally hard ones) for a guy his size and I tend to believe that it has something to do with his uncommon technique. If you've seen this guy do it, you'd believe it too, it has a certain look of flow, efficiency and whip action that justifies the ensuing thundering smash. I guess I'll keep watching and hopefully catch on its essence.

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