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  1. #1
    Regular Member Loh's Avatar
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    Default Badminton-Police investigating match-fixing allegations

    By Reuters

    Published: 17:53 GMT, 13 October 2014 | Updated: 17:53 GMT, 13 October 2014


    Oct 13 (Reuters) - Police are investigating allegations of attempted match-fixing in badminton after two leading Danish professionals alerted the authorities.

    The Badminton World Federation (BWF) confirmed on Monday that it has reported the incidents to police and would be co-operating in an on-going investigation.

    Two of Denmark's leading players, Hans-Kristian Vittinghus and Kim Astrup, told the BWF through its betting "whistle blower" system that they were approached in June and invited to conspire with others to fix matches.

    The Danish Broadcasting Corporation (DR) said the players, world number nine singles player Vittinghus and men's doubles number 22 Astrup, were approached by a Malaysian man through Facebook just before the Japan Open in June.

    DR reported that Vittinghus rejected the offer immediately, reported it to the BWF and asked the organisation to open an investigation.

    Astrup, according to reports, decided to glean more information, asking the alleged match fixer questions before rejecting the offer.

    According to DR, Astrup was offered in the region of 3,000 euros per match and was told he could earn even more if he bet on his own matches. The player then reported the details to the BWF.

    "BWF is very satisfied that the players who were contacted about the match-fixing offer completely rejected it and also reported the case through the BWF 'Whistle Blower' system that has been set up precisely to handle such incidents," said BWF president, Poul-Erik Hoyer Larsen, on Monday.

    Vittinghus told DR: "It is quite scary to be contacted this way by people who want to harm our sport. The only thing I could do was to report the would-be fixer to BWF.

    "But from Facebook, I can see that this guy got accreditation to tournaments and I can see him pose with some of the best Asian players. This scares me.

    "By giving this interview and talking about match-fixing, I hope that everyone will be aware that it is a part of our sport as well as several others. We need to do whatever we can to put an end to it. It goes against everything I stand for as a badminton player."

    According to DR, Astrup was offered in the region of 3,000 euros per match and was told he could earn even more if he bet on his own matches. The player then reported the details to the BWF.

    Astrup revealed to DR that the man had told him that he had also fixed matches in the Thomas Cup and Singapore Open, two of badminton's biggest tournaments.

    "If the Thomas Cup is fixed, we are talking about one of the biggest tournaments in our sport being manipulated. We have to deal with it, because if it can happen here, it can happen everywhere," said Astrup.

    The Kuala Lumpur-based BWF said they had informed the "appropriate police authorities", believed to be in Malaysia, of what they had been told, lodged a report and handed over related documents. (Editing by Ian Chadband)


    Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/wires/reu...#ixzz3G90moWjj
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  2. #2
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    Why Malaysia again...

    But I think it will be more prevalent, because players will get more money from betting than the actual tournament itself

  3. #3
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    Published: Monday October 13, 2014 MYT 5:32:00 PM
    Updated: Monday October 13, 2014 MYT 5:56:11 PM
    Malaysian implicated in alleged badminton match fixing

    by rajes paul

    The Badminton World Federation president Poul-Erik Hoyer of Denmark. - Filepic

    The Badminton World Federation president Poul-Erik Hoyer of Denmark. - Filepic

    KUALA LUMPUR: Match fixing is rearing its ugly head in world badminton and it is learnt that a Malaysian is involved.

    On Monday, the Kuala Lumpur-based Badminton World Federation (BWF) confirmed making two reports of alleged match fixing to the police authorities in Denmark.

    It was reported in the www.badzine.net that two Denmark players - singles star Hans Kristian Vittinghus and doubles specialist Kim Astrup – were approached by a Malaysian to fix their matches at the Japan Open in June. Both the Danes rejected the offers and reported the matter to the BWF.

    Badminton Association of Malaysia’s (BAM) deputy president Datuk Norza Zakaria said he was shocked to hear the news and was saddened that a Malaysian was linked with the incident.

    “This is really shocking. We hear of match fixing in other sports, but to hear such reports in badminton is really shocking,” said Norza.

    “We hope that investigation will be conducted thoroughly and the culprit be brought to justice. As a BAM deputy president, I can assure that we will give our full co-operation in whatever we can to the world body to curb this problem. We do not condone match fixing,” he added.

    Norza added that it was high time for the BAM to set-up a whistle-blowing system in their national set-up.

    “I will make a proposal for us to set up a system where players can report to us immediately if they are approached to throw or fix their matches,” said Norza.

    BWF president Poul-Erik Hoyer was happy that the two players reported the matter to the world body.

    “The BWF are very satisfied that the two players completely rejected the offers and also reported the case through the BWF’s whistle-blowing system set up to handle such incidents,” said Hoyer in a press statement.

    “We are aware of the threats of match fixing in general and that badminton, as well as other sports, can be targets for criminal activities related to match fixing and betting activities. It is, however, a very complex and sensitive area that may involve criminal syndicates. As such, we have offered our full co-operation and assistance to the police authorities to resolve this case,” added the Dane.

    http://www.thestar.com.my/Sport/Badm...chfixing-case/

  4. #4
    Regular Member nokh88's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by opikbidin View Post
    Why Malaysia again...

    But I think it will be more prevalent, because players will get more money from betting than the actual tournament itself
    The prize money is so little.
    Yes, why MAS? Any MAS players on the take? Anyone thinking what I am thinking? Hehe..

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    Quote Originally Posted by nokh88 View Post
    The prize money is so little.
    Yes, why MAS? Any MAS players on the take? Anyone thinking what I am thinking? Hehe..
    Why MAS? What's the proof? Singapore has a football betting ring...

  6. #6
    Regular Member nokh88's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Cheung View Post
    Why MAS? What's the proof? Singapore has a football betting ring...
    Yeah..Why always MAS. Let the police do their work.
    Bottom of the article :
    The BWF, who are based in Kuala Lumpur, have already reported the matter to the police and handed over the relevant documents

    Courtesy of The Star :

    Boe and Axelsen call for swift action against match fixing

    by kng zheng guan

    Danish men's doubles shuttler Mathias Boe. - Filepic.

    ODENSE: Top badminton players have rallied to condemn the emergence of match-fixing in their sport.

    On Monday, the Badminton World Federation (BWF) confirmed that two Danish players – men’s singles world No. 9 Hans-Kristian Vittinghus and doubles specialist Kim Astrup Sorensen – were approached by a bookie before the Japan Open in June.

    According to a Reuters report, the bookie, believed to be a Malaysian, had approached both players via Fa cebook and that Astrup was offered in the region of €3,000 (RM12,400) per match.

    Both players rejected the offer and reported it to BWF.

    Top Danish doubles shuttler Mathias Boe, who forms the world No. 3 pairing with Carsten Mogensen, applauded his compatriots’ decision.

    “It’s not good for the sport at all... it’s a total disgrace,” said Boe, 34, during the Denmark Open on Tuesday.

    “There will always be match-fixing involved in sports but badminton should not give in. We have to fight it any way we can.

    “I won’t lie and say there’s no match-fixing in badminton. There’s always betting, regardless of sports... be it football or tennis.

    “Although I’ve never been approached by bookies, I know it’s been around. It’s time we kick it out of our sport completely.”

    Young Danish rising star Viktor Axelsen also feels that badminton should take serious steps towards ridding itself of match-fixing.

    “Personally, it’s against everything that I stand for because it really ruins the beautiful sport that we have,” said the 20-year-old world No. 11.

    “We should take proper and serious actions against such individuals. I’m glad we are doing it the right way.”

    The BWF, who are based in Kuala Lumpur, have already reported the matter to the police and handed over the relevant documents.

  7. #7
    Regular Member nokh88's Avatar
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    Courtesy of The Star :

    I've never been courted, says Chong Wei

    by rajes paul

    PETALING JAYA: World No. 1 Lee Chong Wei admitted that he has heard talks of match fixing in badminton – but insisted that no one has approached him in all his years of playing the game.

    “I have never been approached. I guess no one dared to approach the world No. 1 player on this. Anyway, I do not resort to such things,” said Chong Wei on Wednesday.

    “Money may be offered in all this but, to me, money is not important, the result is more important.”

    On Monday, the Badminton World Federation (BWF) stated that they had made a police report over allegation on match fixing by two players via their betting whistle-blower system.

    A website, www.badzine.net, named the two players as Denmark’s men singles shuttler Hans Kristian Vittinghus and doubles shuttler Kim Astrup Sorensen.

    The duo alleged that a Malaysian man wanted them to manipulate their matches during the Japan Open in June.

    The matter is currently being investigated by the Malaysian police.

    Chong Wei hopes that the police would be able to nail the culprits quickly and restore the image of badminton.

    “I hope the police will get to the bottom of this. News like this do no good to the profile of badminton.”

    Chong Wei also pointed out that some players had been accused of fixing matches or involved in betting although they worked really hard and played true to their abilities.

    “How many times have we heard about such things whenever a player loses in a tournament ... it is easy and convenient for others to say that he or she sold the match. As a player, we cannot stop others from talking about it,” said Chong Wei.

    “So, it is best that we work together to eradicate this match-fixing and betting issues for good. Then, no one will use this as an excuse when a player loses.

    Three-time All-England champion Chong Wei was also disappointed to learn of a Malaysian’s involvement in the match-fixing scandal.

    “It is sad that a Malaysian may be involved in this. In the past, I heard that match-fixing in badminton wasn’t so big because there was no market for it. I guess people are getting bolder now ... but this must be stopped,” said Chong Wei, who is on a short break from international tournaments.

    He has skipped the ongoing Denmark Open and will give next week’s French Open a miss as well in a bid to recover from the disappointments of losing to Chen Long of China in the final of the World Championships in Copenhagen in August and to Lin Dan of China in the final of the Asian Games in Incheon last month.

    Bold part : Don't understimate the bookies.

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