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  1. #18
    Regular Member Blitzzards's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by bandit12811 View Post
    In response to Blitzzards, rackets do just collapse. I am not an amateur stringer, and the my colleagues in the shop I work in are Master Racket Technicians and string at Wimbledon, All England etc. We have had quite a few recent Carlton rackets just collapse at tensions inside the recommended range, and this is on Wilson Baiardo machines. Also, I recently had two Karakal MTEC 70s snap on me, and they were brand new rackets, so it does happen every now and again.

    So yeah, if that racket wasn't guaranteed up to 26lbs, then don't guarantee the restring. If it snapped inside warranty tension, suggest they return the racket to the manufacturer.Hope that helps!Daniel
    I personally am an amateur stringer and I have done my Yonex racquets (which are all warrantied for tensions up to 24 and 25lbs only) up to tensions of 31 to 34lbs and they are all still playing fine with no sign of weakness in the frame.

    What does that tell you? Remember what I said about the fact that racquets with inferior graphite exists?

  2. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by Blitzzards View Post
    I personally am an amateur stringer and I have done my Yonex racquets (which are all warrantied for tensions up to 24 and 25lbs only) up to tensions of 31 to 34lbs and they are all still playing fine with no sign of weakness in the frame.What does that tell you? Remember what I said about the fact that racquets with inferior graphite exists?
    Sorry, my post came across rude. It wasn't meant to! :/ Many rackets will take the tension fine. Yonex is a good example, as their rackets are of much higher quality than their warranty makes out, as you point out. Just saying it can happen with some rackets, so as you say, while good ones should be fine, if the racket is of lower quality or has been mistreated it could just snap on the machine, not necessarily having hit something. Also, I feel if a racket does snap when being strung outside of the tension range on the racket, even if it is Li-Ning, Yonex or Victor (the only quality makes IMO), I don't really feel that the stringer can be held accountable.Daniel

  3. #20
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    Since I re-string as a hobby rather than a business (counting on the $$ to feed the family), I usually explain it to the customer after this type of breakage. Most ppl tend to understand and honest, but there're always a small percentage insist otherwise. For such cases, I still offer re-string free of charge, but made it clear that it's purely as a favor, and usually a 1 time deal.

  4. #21
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    You might already know this, but I'm surprised that a lot of people don't... you should never leave a racquet with a snapped string as it is, always cut the strings to release the tension. You can probably see from the photo that the shape of the head is already slightly distorted.

  5. #22
    Regular Member Mark A's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by R20190 View Post
    You might already know this, but I'm surprised that a lot of people don't... you should never leave a racquet with a snapped string as it is, always cut the strings to release the tension. You can probably see from the photo that the shape of the head is already slightly distorted.
    Yep - I annoy my co-players when I go off-court to cut my strings and keep them waiting.

    I think O/P left the racket in that state just to get the picture, though. You can tell the string broke at the top of main #4.

  6. #23
    Regular Member Blitzzards's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by bandit12811 View Post
    Sorry, my post came across rude. It wasn't meant to! :/ Many rackets will take the tension fine. Yonex is a good example, as their rackets are of much higher quality than their warranty makes out, as you point out. Just saying it can happen with some rackets, so as you say, while good ones should be fine, if the racket is of lower quality or has been mistreated it could just snap on the machine, not necessarily having hit something. Also, I feel if a racket does snap when being strung outside of the tension range on the racket, even if it is Li-Ning, Yonex or Victor (the only quality makes IMO), I don't really feel that the stringer can be held accountable.Daniel
    Actually I believe that the maximum physically tolerable tension range for the high quality branded racquets (that you mentioned) is about a whopping 38 to 40lbs (or even more, I certainly have not tried!), before they physically fall apart in the machine.

    But the highest tensions I have ever heard of the big muscled European professionals ever going to is about 36 to 35/37lbs (main/cross) which is a tiny bit lower than the maximum I stated

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    It is OK to wait to end of day if it is less than 27 lb. In my opinion, it is OK to leave the broken string on for 0.5~1 hr if it is 27~30 lb. If it is higher than 30 lb, cut them after the game. It is very rude to leave the court and cut the string during a match.

  8. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by Blitzzards View Post
    Actually I believe that the maximum physically tolerable tension range for the high quality branded racquets (that you mentioned) is about a whopping 38 to 40lbs (or even more, I certainly have not tried!), before they physically fall apart in the machine.

    But the highest tensions I have ever heard of the big muscled European professionals ever going to is about 36 to 35/37lbs (main/cross) which is a tiny bit lower than the maximum I stated
    I just want to add a few points.
    1) Yes, in perfect condition on a brand new racquet with a very good machine and experienced stringer, yes, a major badminton name brand (Wilson and Prince does not count) racquet can take up to 40 lb string job. In fact, they do not fall apart on the machine, it is the in balance after string break the will kill the racquet.
    2) The physical max tension for standard string (BG65) is about 52~55 lb. If you string a racquet at 40 lb and hit a hard smash, the string will break because it has exceed the string's limit.

  9. #26
    Regular Member Blitzzards's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by silentheart View Post
    I just want to add a few points.
    1) Yes, in perfect condition on a brand new racquet with a very good machine and experienced stringer, yes, a major badminton name brand (Wilson and Prince does not count) racquet can take up to 40 lb string job. In fact, they do not fall apart on the machine, it is the in balance after string break the will kill the racquet.
    2) The physical max tension for standard string (BG65) is about 52~55 lb. If you string a racquet at 40 lb and hit a hard smash, the string will break because it has exceed the string's limit.
    Thank you master silentheart for confirming my theory on the physical structure of badminton racquets

    There is also a reason why even the European professionals do not use up to 40lbs of tension, in contrast to some popular rumours.

    On a side note, the truth is, due to the relatively more muscular build of the European professionals who also do not have the wrist and forearm flexibility of the Asian players (the main reason why the top tennis players are the big muscular Caucasians and not Asians...), they actually use higher tensions with more full arm swings to compensate for power (Asians have more forearm and finger power), much like playing a more compact and precise form of tennis.

  10. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by Blitzzards View Post
    Thank you master silentheart for confirming my theory on the physical structure of badminton racquets There is also a reason why even the European professionals do not use up to 40lbs of tension, in contrast to some popular rumours.On a side note, the truth is, due to the relatively more muscular build of the European professionals who also do not have the wrist and forearm flexibility of the Asian players (the main reason why the top tennis players are the big muscular Caucasians and not Asians...), they actually use higher tensions with more full arm swings to compensate for power (Asians have more forearm and finger power), much like playing a more compact and precise form of tennis.
    Rackets do just collapse on the machine, without the string breaking! I have watched two of my own karakals do it being strung inside of warranty tension, and a Carlton vapour trail tour at 24lbs The string was salvagable in all three cases, as it did not snap.Oh and btw, I challenge you to string a badminton racket at 40lbs.

  11. #28
    Regular Member Blitzzards's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by bandit12811 View Post
    Rackets do just collapse on the machine, without the string breaking! I have watched two of my own karakals do it being strung inside of warranty tension, and a Carlton vapour trail tour at 24lbs The string was salvagable in all three cases, as it did not snap.
    I do believe that in some cases the racquet may collapse inside the machine, but the collapse should be in one direction and not the twisted warpage that a lot of people imaginatively fear.

    Quote Originally Posted by bandit12811 View Post
    Oh and btw, I challenge you to string a badminton racket at 40lbs.
    Dinkalot [Mr. Dan Chien] has already beaten your challenge:





    Besides, it will be a waste of time and string for me anyway, since the very maximum string tension that I use is "only" 34lbs and a 40lb racquet will have its string snapped in 5 minutes as according to Master silentheart. Dan has also stated the same experience with the very racquet he strung in the video.

  12. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by bandit12811 View Post
    Rackets do just collapse on the machine, without the string breaking! I have watched two of my own karakals do it being strung inside of warranty tension, and a Carlton vapour trail tour at 24lbs The string was salvagable in all three cases, as it did not snap.Oh and btw, I challenge you to string a badminton racket at 40lbs.
    May I ask your Karakals are one of the super light models? I have know stringer breaking them during stringing process at 26~28 lb range. We are talking about the more reputable brands such as YY, RSL, Victor.

    I have done string job on YY racquet at 32.5x36 lb. I know Master PeteLSD done his racquet at 38 lb.
    My question is If I string up a ARC8DX at 36x40 lb and it is fine. Then the frame break after the string broke. Are you going to pay for my lost? What are you? 5 yr old and playing I dare you? Grow up.

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    Oh yeah, not often twisted warpage, usually a tiny little crack appears as you pull about the fourth or fifth cross. 34lbs. How many restrings do you get out of your rackets? :/ Also, what string do you use, and how long do your strings normally last? I'm not a five year old, actually, I am just pretty sure there are pretty few rackets around that would take that tension. Since you mentioned Arc8DX, and I own one, I might try it. Oh and yes, my rackets were superlights. I was always surprised with the warranty claim on those rackets, but had two that survived 28lbs many, many times. I think the quality is different on the predominantly black MTEC70s, as opposed to the predominantly white ones. I think the black ones are a load of rubbish! :/

  15. #31
    Regular Member Blitzzards's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by bandit12811 View Post
    Oh yeah, not often twisted warpage, usually a tiny little crack appears as you pull about the fourth or fifth cross. 34lbs. How many restrings do you get out of your rackets? :/ Also, what string do you use, and how long do your strings normally last?
    The string I have strung at 33 and 34lbs is mostly BG65, and they can last me up to about 8 months of regular play. But it is the fact that I use these racquets for singles games (i.e. not constant smashing and more shot variety per match) that makes the seemingly extended durability of the strings at such tensions feasible.

    I have done about at least 4 restrings on the racquets that I mentioned, and I believe it is due to the 6 point support of my machine which allows the racquet to stay strong during the stringing, and also that I rarely mishit.

  16. #32
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    BG65 is pretty durable, but even so that is pretty impressive. I plainly mainly doubles, and I tend to play at the back most of the time as my jump smash is consistent and pretty hard. Causes my strings to go pretty quick though. My NBG98 at 28 goes in about a month and a half, but I do play everyday for a good few hours. Semi-pro, what tournaments do you play?Six-point mounting is essential. Our baiardo machines have a 6+2 point mounting system, with an extra bar to brace the racket.

  17. #33
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    I don't think normal situation apply to me. So I will give example from players I know.
    Player #1 Former Malaysia Jr National team player. He started with AT900P when I met him. Strung with NBG98 @ 29X32lb. Then he switch to ARC-Z with 27x30. Then he tried LN N90 for 3 month at 27x30. Then again switch back to ARC-Z at 26.5x29. All these time, none of his racquet broke. I est he break his 1 string every 3~4 weeks
    Player #2 An advanced player with BG80. He uses 2 models. #1 AT800-off, I strung that one at 29x32lb for him for 3 yr. Eventually the string cut through the grommets and dent the frame. But the racquet never die. He retired it about 6 month ago. #2 is a AT900-p. I have strung them at 26x29 lb for him. Yes, all his 2 AT900-p has grommets cut through and dented frame after 2 years. But they are still doing well. I est he break 1 string every 5~6 week.
    Player #2's AT800-off was strung at 33x36 lb first time when I stung for him. I used a M140 machine with additional side support. It scared the crap out of me. But it actually worked.

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