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    Regular Member betazone's Avatar
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    Wink best strategy in receiving men doubles serve ?

    Hi Guys,

    I am having some trouble lately, found that i hv this bad tendency to rush to net and push the shuttle to the back nearly all the time when receiving low serve , this works against slow opponents but for the good ones they just do a fast flat push to my side and I am disadvantaged because I am very near to the net, and my partner must cover a big portion of the court.

    Wonder is there any youtube video or online resource guide on this area? I am trying to consciously tell myself to give a lite touch to shuttle and force opponent to lift but old habits die hard.

    Hope to hear your thoughts on this

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    Why don't you vary and play a netshot off return of serve sometimes? Plenty of top players do this.

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    Regular Member visor's Avatar
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    I'm often guilty of this many times myself, especially if I'm feeling aggressive. And I have to constantly remind myself that all I need to do is push or tap it just past the server into the mid alleys, especially on the backhand side. Of course if you get a poor serve that is ripe for putting away, then for sure do that!

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    hmm, yeah you should vary your return shots but your partner is suppose to already be there to cover the back of your side of the court in case you miss the intercept of the flat push anyways.

    any crosscourt returns would give both of you more reaction time for both of you to recover.

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    I think I would play 4 shots in this situation:

    A drop shot, this sets up your partner, stay close to the net, if they drop back, push behind them/pounce on the shuttle.

    A shot to the middle court, this may confuse some partners as they both go for it, either way, most people will tend to clear after that so you would set up for your partner.

    If the serve is high, go for a kill, or against slow opponent, push to the corners.

    Lift, if you know they don't have a hard smasher in the back and are confident in your defense so you play a lift. But I wouldn't just suggest lifting it high for them to smash, possibly a lift to their backhand but not too high where they can smash, but force them to use their backhand. This is good against people who don't have such a good backhand.

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    Straight push is the easiest choice but once the opponents are prepared for it they can counter it effectively like you said.

    Vary the returns: low straight push to half court, cross net in front of server, low push straight at server, push past server along their partners unsighted line, lift to server partners backhand.

    Practice them in relaxed games or even drill sessions before employing them in a tense game. Both you and partner will have to get used to the new patterns.

    For a youtube link have a look at BWF's Coach Education clip 40 - CE1M8V8 - Tactics - Men's doubles serve and return

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=x6FHTqdHGXo

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    There's nothing wrong with pushing the shuttle low and flat to a back corner, as long as you're not playing exactly the same shot every time. You need to think about your movement after returning: don't stay in the centre, but move across to the side where you played your shot, and keep your racket up ready to intercept. (If your return is too high, you might get caught out by a cross-court drop shot. But if you keep the return low, that shouldn't be a threat.) Watch the video linked above, starting at 1:30.

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    Regular Member betazone's Avatar
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    thanks everyone!!!!

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    I have a question. What foot do you use to make a big step when recieving/rushing? Your left or your right?

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    Quote Originally Posted by venkatesh View Post
    I have a question. What foot do you use to make a big step when recieving/rushing? Your left or your right?
    Use your racket foot to take the step. So if you're right-handed, use your right foot, and if you're left-handed, use your left foot. It helps you reach a bit further that way.

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    Regular Member Tadashi's Avatar
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    Betazone, long story short. The answer comes last.The best strategy depends on many things: one important thing is how to reply; another how you expect yourself to reply and how the other side sees what you expect ... What you can do in general in response to the flick/drive:KILL First things first: the server has the disadvantage because they have to lift the shuttle from the midcourt - resulting in a kill, if not played very well. So, your attempts to kill ... just the best strategy; PUSH if the flick serve is excellent, try a push to the forecourt and midcourt: push means not getting into the rear ... . It's basically like getting behind a shuttle after a high clear but doing it with the ankles only.CLEAR If you cannot handle your own power ... don't try a high clear to the corners or the middle, because this also requires control of power, except you shoot so high that it cannot leave the court. DROP An excellent reply to the perfect flick serve is an even more excellent net reply, like the push.Here is the difficult way to think:If you think logically, your answer does not depend on what you'd like to do ... but on what your opponent thinks you canNOT handle. They basically play so in expectation of what you show them to expect from them. The answer is simple: look how you stand and where you stand when receiving a serve in doubles. If it looks like you're rushing to the side ... well, no one will play "a fast flat push to my side", pretty simple. Try to deceive, show them preparedness for receiving flicks and drives to the side by have the foots so that you actually could receive them... then try to learn to play the things listed above.

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    Regular Member betazone's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by venkatesh View Post
    I have a question. What foot do you use to make a big step when recieving/rushing? Your left or your right?
    depends, I don't think we should generalize this. I used both but 90% of time I will use my hind leg ( left foot front right front back in ready position), but 10% time I used front leg lunge to be aggressive.

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    Regular Member betazone's Avatar
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    That's a lot of info. Need time to digest. thanks mate !

    Quote Originally Posted by Tadashi View Post
    Betazone, long story short. The answer comes last.The best strategy depends on many things: one important thing is how to reply; another how you expect yourself to reply and how the other side sees what you expect ... What you can do in general in response to the flick/drive:KILL First things first: the server has the disadvantage because they have to lift the shuttle from the midcourt - resulting in a kill, if not played very well. So, your attempts to kill ... just the best strategy; PUSH if the flick serve is excellent, try a push to the forecourt and midcourt: push means not getting into the rear ... . It's basically like getting behind a shuttle after a high clear but doing it with the ankles only.CLEAR If you cannot handle your own power ... don't try a high clear to the corners or the middle, because this also requires control of power, except you shoot so high that it cannot leave the court. DROP An excellent reply to the perfect flick serve is an even more excellent net reply, like the push.Here is the difficult way to think:If you think logically, your answer does not depend on what you'd like to do ... but on what your opponent thinks you canNOT handle. They basically play so in expectation of what you show them to expect from them. The answer is simple: look how you stand and where you stand when receiving a serve in doubles. If it looks like you're rushing to the side ... well, no one will play "a fast flat push to my side", pretty simple. Try to deceive, show them preparedness for receiving flicks and drives to the side by have the foots so that you actually could receive them... then try to learn to play the things listed above.

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    Regular Member betazone's Avatar
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    Hi Guys,
    I hv tried some of the tips. I find relaxing my grip before receiving to be very effective, because then I can adjust my grip to either net, push or lift. The other very useful tip is telling myself where I want to place the shuttle before I hit the shot....it works.....thanks to everyone who has contributed.

    Pls keep this thread alive if you hv new insights...happy smashing !!

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    Quote Originally Posted by OHMAHGAWDZ View Post
    Use your racket foot to take the step. So if you're right-handed, use your right foot, and if you're left-handed, use your left foot. It helps you reach a bit further that way.
    Which leg to use depends on your distance from the net, which in turns depends on whether you can handle your opponent's flick serve. If you stand close enough to the net, and have reasonably explosive footwork, the non-racket leg is faster.

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    The choice of return depends on your two opponent's strengths and weaknesses, and where the serve goes.

    E.g. if the serve goes wide, esp. to your forehand side, a straight deep push would get to your rear opponent's backhand. And a lot of players' backhand is weaker... Still you need to vary your shot.

    If server doesn't follow in with his serve, you can play net away from him. But if he's imposing, and follow in, you can probably only play such net shots with good disguise (e.g. with racket face more vertical), or they'd kill your reply.

    If you play a straight reply, e.g. down the alley, your racket should automatically and immediately up looking for a straight response from opponent. Your partner needs to cover the other 3 corners. Another good video to watch is the one from Lee Jia Bok - helping front court player. Of course, you'd need to pair up with one that knows this protocol.

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    Quote Originally Posted by OHMAHGAWDZ View Post
    Use your racket foot to take the step. So if you're right-handed, use your right foot, and if you're left-handed, use your left foot. It helps you reach a bit further that way.
    The reason I've asked is because I've been seeing a lot of international players (e.g., JJS) recieve using their left foot (for right handed).

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