User Tag List

Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast
Results 1 to 17 of 27
  1. #1
    Regular Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2015
    Location
    On the court
    Posts
    83
    Mentioned
    2 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default Wise to get bigger? (Muscles)

    Hi, would it be wise to get really huge arms and a big chest? I like to go to the gym but I don't power lift or anything like that. I usually go to keep fit and see what's working and what I can improve on but I wanna start bulking fast and get huge muscles. My question is that would it be wise to do so? I don't see anybody on the BWF international that's really big except Ko Sung Hyun and Fu Haifengs left arm I've been told that having big arms and a big chest can really ruin/affect the way you swing. Is this true?

  2. #2
    Regular Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2011
    Location
    Berlin
    Posts
    312
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default

    dont worry you wont get big muscles

  3. #3
    Regular Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2015
    Location
    UK
    Posts
    10
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default

    As you say you don't see many pro players with hugh muscles, so I think there lies the answer!

  4. #4
    Regular Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Location
    california
    Posts
    99
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default

    Depends on where you stand in accordance to how much you want to improve if at all. If you're perfectly okay with the level you're playing, I'd think it'd be okay. However, if you do want to get better, I think putting on some (not a lot of) muscle mass would help prevent injuries and help with your game. Granted, it's the muscles you use when playing. Bigger muscles don't always equal more power.

  5. #5
    Regular Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2011
    Location
    Here
    Posts
    275
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default

    The simplified logic goes like this, you need both muscle and flexibility to be optimal (body wise) in badminton. Up to a certain point, more muscle would reduce flexibility. Therefore, to be optimal, you must find that balance between the two of them. Every person has a different balance point.

  6. #6
    Regular Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Location
    Nor Cal
    Posts
    861
    Mentioned
    3 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default

    It's hard to determine what's the "right" amount of muscle except from what you see with the pros. However do you have a smaller/slimmer build who finds it difficult to put on weight/muscle? Or are you more on the larger/mesomorph or endomorph body type?

    If you're on the smaller/slimmer end, lifting increasingly heavier weights (close to your max) I believe can only help you as you will most likely never reach a bodybuilder/powerlifter body unless you train seriously with a strict diet for years.

    I guess what I'm trying to say is that although people here are telling you that it's not optimal to have bulky huge muscles, the reality is that most of all people will never reach that stage due to the physical and mental commitment needed to reach that point. You would be so fatigued and short on time from lifting weights in the gym that you probably wouldn't have time to play badminton!

    In short, weight lifting to increase your strength will definitely benefit you and you should not be deterred from weight lifting just from what we have said here.

    Now if you in fact have close to a bodybuilder/powerlifter body type, I think the advice people have said here is quite correct.

  7. #7
    Regular Member mikescully's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2014
    Location
    Japan
    Posts
    431
    Mentioned
    6 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default

    If you're playing doubles then having powerful muscles especially shoulder, forearm really help with getting powerful, heavy smashes just like FHF, KSH and it would be easier to handle head heavy rackets on a regular basis, it's just you have to keep training on your days off from badminton to maintain that level of power and with pros like FHF, KSH they have trainers and program set to always ensure they're fit and ready for world tournaments.

  8. #8
    Regular Member visor's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    Vancouver, BC
    Posts
    12,764
    Mentioned
    217 Post(s)
    Tagged
    1 Thread(s)

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by SSSSNT View Post
    The simplified logic goes like this, you need both muscle and flexibility to be optimal (body wise) in badminton. Up to a certain point, more muscle would reduce flexibility. Therefore, to be optimal, you must find that balance between the two of them. Every person has a different balance point.
    Very true.

  9. #9
    Regular Member visor's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    Vancouver, BC
    Posts
    12,764
    Mentioned
    217 Post(s)
    Tagged
    1 Thread(s)

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by mikescully View Post
    If you're playing doubles then having powerful muscles especially shoulder, forearm really help with getting powerful, heavy smashes just like FHF, KSH and it would be easier to handle head heavy rackets on a regular basis, it's just you have to keep training on your days off from badminton to maintain that level of power and with pros like FHF, KSH they have trainers and program set to always ensure they're fit and ready for world tournaments.
    But interestingly and paradoxically to note, both KSH and FHF play with flexier head balanced rackets instead of stiffer head heavier ones, despite them having the physique to handle the latter.

  10. #10
    New Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2015
    Location
    Vancouver
    Posts
    3
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default

    If you just want to get 'big' quick, it will really slow you down, and could reduce your range of motion and flexibility. This will affect your speed on court and your shots. If you want to get stronger and fitter, it will most likely help your game. Stick to lower weight when lifting and do 12+ reps in your sets. Don't try and bulk up by eating dirty. Be sure to stretch, and keep your range of motion up by doing the less mainstream shoulder/back exercieses that work the smaller muscles in there. Bench press and bicep curls alone won't help your badminton much. All my expertise comes from me training like this and surpassing my equally skilled brother who fouses on the heavy lifting/heavy eating in the gym.

  11. #11
    Regular Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2015
    Location
    On the court
    Posts
    83
    Mentioned
    2 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default

    So would you say that having my wider arm muscles really changes the way you swing your racket to the point where it's wider/longer and then you would benefit more from a racket that's more flexible and medium?

  12. #12
    Regular Member mikescully's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2014
    Location
    Japan
    Posts
    431
    Mentioned
    6 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by visor View Post
    But interestingly and paradoxically to note, both KSH and FHF play with flexier head balanced rackets instead of stiffer head heavier ones, despite them having the physique to handle the latter.
    It's true, all I'm saying is that weight training especially arm could help with getting the power play for doubles play, and is highly beneficial for those going for power attacks using head heavy rackets (e.g VTZF2).

  13. #13
    Regular Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    UK
    Posts
    2,711
    Mentioned
    44 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by William.Hooley View Post
    All my expertise comes from me training like this and surpassing my equally skilled brother who fouses on the heavy lifting/heavy eating in the gym.
    You mean all your advice is anecdotal? Ok, gotcha.

    Your advice is poor tbh. 12+ reps for badminton is too much. Badminton needs explosive power from the muscles.

    http://www.brendanchaplin.co.uk/buil...nton-athletes/

    4: I was wondering why your exercises are so low in rep range. I understand you need to get the power but I would expect also that muscle endurance is an important factor. Which you train, in my belief, in a rep range of 15/20 and higher. I was wondering why you choose for only max strength and not for a combination of both.

    If you would do a combination, how would you programme that in a schedule?

    When I look at a sport from a physical perspective, I look at the demands placed on the body and work out how to best train for this within a programme in line with what the athletes are already going through. Clearly there are muscular endurance demands in badminton, no question. However the training volume the players go through day-by-day means that they actually have a good level of muscular endurance already. So from my point of view it would not be a good idea to focus on this in the gym. What the players lack is basic and maximal strength, which is developed through heavy loads and lower reps.

    Also, when you look at the major movements in the sport, they require extremely high levels of strength to execute them with speed and power and then recover for the next shot. So developing greater maximal strength allows you to use relatively less effort when executing these movements meaning that in a sense your muscular endurance improves anyway.
    http://www.brendanchaplin.co.uk/badminton-q-and-a/
    Last edited by amleto; 09-13-2015 at 06:45 AM.

  14. #14
    Regular Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2014
    Location
    SW UK
    Posts
    926
    Mentioned
    18 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default

    @amleto thanks for that! I've actually been looking into some gym stuff and I'd heard both sides of the story, heavy loads low reps is what a personal trainer recommended to me too.

    5 reps, 3 sets?

  15. #15
    Regular Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    UK
    Posts
    2,711
    Mentioned
    44 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default

    Sounds ok to me, but I am definitely no expert. I know just enough to be dangerous... (and smell BS from people with 'expertise')

  16. #16
    Regular Member Mark A's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Location
    St Helens, UK
    Posts
    5,758
    Mentioned
    61 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Diamondx1 View Post
    Hi, would it be wise to get really huge arms and a big chest? I like to go to the gym but I don't power lift or anything like that. I usually go to keep fit and see what's working and what I can improve on but I wanna start bulking fast and get huge muscles. My question is that would it be wise to do so? I don't see anybody on the BWF international that's really big except Ko Sung Hyun and Fu Haifengs left arm I've been told that having big arms and a big chest can really ruin/affect the way you swing. Is this true?
    Adding anything that doesn't contribute to badminton movements will only make you heavier for no badminton gain, and chest and upper arm do very little.

    If you're going to put mass somewhere, stick it on your legs!

  17. #17
    Regular Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    HK
    Posts
    1,888
    Mentioned
    19 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default

    Big muscle is only to impress other guys. I heard even girls get turned off by it.
    As for badminton, no use at all.

Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •