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    Default Not many badminton players with big muscles.

    So I was wondering, why aren't there more badminton players with thicker muscles. I used to be an avid badminton player, I stopped for a couple years and took up weight training. Now I'm not talking about hardcore body-building, but weight training that focuses on function and strength.

    In terms of flexibility, I am the same (maybe even more flexible), but I am quite a bit bigger than I used to be. This is due to muscle density (the more dense your muscles are the bigger you will be)

    Now here is my thinking, if you weight train for strength and function, you mainly do compound exercises, bench press, deadlifts, squats etc. etc. Wouldn't a stronger core = a better badminton player.

    Being bigger doesn't mean you have to lose any flexibility, not if you stretch for a good 5-10 minutes before you lift weights.

    Now I know most badminton players have good core muscles, however wouldn't further weight training just supplement their core?

    Today was my first day back on court, even though my technique was lacking, I could go harder and faster than I could've ever imagined before I took up a weight training regimen.

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    Most professionals do plenty of weight training, but I believe they work on muscular endurance rather than hypertrophy. Lower weight, higher reps maybe? Many techniques offers a simpler way to get power, by utilizing more muscles in your movements, thus rendering weight training to be less effective than technique. But obviously as professionals everything they do is to give them an edge over their opponent, so weight training must impact their games as you said.

    EDIT: training muscular endurance usually tones muscles, but doesn't necessarily gain size

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    I agree with Steve the noob. Their weight training is aimed at explosiveness while still maintaining great endurance, which is a challenge, because the bigger/more weighty your muscles are, the less endurance you have, but if you are too light, then you lose explosiveness and power in your shots.

    I see what you mean, though.

    At some point, muscles hinder the relatively light game of badminton. It's sort of like finding the perfect weight racket. I feel like in doubles, players have more leeway with how much muscle they have.

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    Badminton is about speed and explosiveness, not raw power.

    For example, look at KSH, his muscular build slows him down a little on the court.

    But core muscles, definitely work on them, but having stronger core muscles will only be useful if they are used properly in your technique.
    Last edited by visor; 08-10-2014 at 11:24 AM.

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    Why not do both, I find that hitting each bodypart twice a week gives me optimal results. 1 session of higher weights, lower reps and 1 higher reps lower weight. I do a Push Pull Legs rotation, which means bench, deadlift, squat, rest, bench, deadlift, squat.

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    Actually if I think about it, the amount of cardio pro badminton players do simply does not let them add muscle mass without eating something stupid like 10000 calories a day which is very impractical. Sure they might carbload before a match but 10000 calories a day... silly me xD

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    Quote Originally Posted by Serenity- View Post
    So I was wondering, why aren't there more badminton players with thicker muscles. I used to be an avid badminton player, I stopped for a couple years and took up weight training. Now I'm not talking about hardcore body-building, but weight training that focuses on function and strength.

    In terms of flexibility, I am the same (maybe even more flexible), but I am quite a bit bigger than I used to be. This is due to muscle density (the more dense your muscles are the bigger you will be)

    Now here is my thinking, if you weight train for strength and function, you mainly do compound exercises, bench press, deadlifts, squats etc. etc. Wouldn't a stronger core = a better badminton player.

    Being bigger doesn't mean you have to lose any flexibility, not if you stretch for a good 5-10 minutes before you lift weights.

    Now I know most badminton players have good core muscles, however wouldn't further weight training just supplement their core?

    Today was my first day back on court, even though my technique was lacking, I could go harder and faster than I could've ever imagined before I took up a weight training regimen.
    Your assumption is that professional badminton players are thin, therefore they are not using weight training in their regime.

    Actually, they do weight training as a supplement. Just because they are thin doesn't mean they are not doing weight training.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Steve the noob View Post
    EDIT: training muscular endurance usually tones muscles, but doesn't necessarily gain size
    there's no such thing as 'toning' a muscle.

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    Weight training is used by professional badminton players. However, bulking up the upper body is not a major training goal for them.

    I would say it's just not enough of a priority, and their training and playing demands are already so high that it's difficult to fit in everything. But do note that most professional male badminton players have big legs!

    In general I would encourage badminton players to do some strength training. And if you want to bulk up, that's fine too -- I really don't think you need to worry about getting slow, unless perhaps you have the build of a professional weightlifter or bodybuilder. On the whole, I think adding more muscle helps players, and I would recommend the compound lifts that you mentioned.

    It is possible to develop the upper body so much that you slow down. But really, I don't think it's likely for many people. If you're worried about this, just add one training requirement: you're not allowed to bulk up your upper body any more, until you can squat (with good depth!) 1.5 times body weight for 3 sets of 5 (or thereabouts).

    Anyone who can squat 1.5 bodyweight has strong enough legs to carry his upper body around the court.
    Last edited by Gollum; 08-11-2014 at 08:12 AM.

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    i totally agree with gollum

    weight training, especially the here mentioned exercises help alot for badminton!

    the worrying about getting too bulky or slow are completely nonsense, you would have to spent and dedicate your whole life to muscle/strength/bodybuilding training to get near to that stage...


    normal well done weight training makes you faster, more explosive, better protected vs injuries etcetc

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    If anyone has any time to do supplementary gym exercises, *plyometric* exercises are more important than weight training exercises for the badminton player...
    Last edited by visor; 08-11-2014 at 10:42 AM.

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    I think double's players train their legs hard in the gym. By that, I mean, heavy weights. You get the explosiveness from the back of the court via legs.

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    Quote Originally Posted by visor View Post
    If anyone has any time to do supplementary gym exercises, *plyometric* exercises are more important than weight training exercises for the badminton player...
    Plyometric exercises can be useful for sure, but it's worth remembering the relationship between strength and power. Strength is the ability to produce force. Power is the ability to produce force quickly.

    Power and speed training (e.g. plyometrics) can help you make the most of the strength you already have. So that is definitely one way to increase power.

    Another way to increase power is by increasing your underlying strength. For example, someone with a 200 kg deadlift will always have a heavier power clean than someone with a 100 kg deadlift -- regardless of how much they train the power clean. The person with the 200 kg deadlift is just a lot stronger, and can therefore develop more power.

    (The power clean is an exercise that can be used to increase jump height.)

    Probably the best approach is some combination of strength and power/speed training, with the balance adjusted for the sport. For example, badminton would be balanced more towards power/speed, and rugby more towards strength.


    I think double's players train their legs hard in the gym. By that, I mean, heavy weights. You get the explosiveness from the back of the court via legs.
    Singles players too.

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    Quote Originally Posted by amleto View Post
    there's no such thing as 'toning' a muscle.
    Good to know

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    The part about functional training is true, although traditional exercises and isolation movements which work small muscles won't really help. I have found that a few round of HIIT cardio and circuit training really helps with both stamina and the ability to produce power on demand, even when you're at the fag end of your strength...much like that one good leap or smash to finish a game

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    They totally have muscle tho...

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    Even top ranked boxers doesn't look that much more muscular than badminton players

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