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  1. #52
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    i got question...strange maybe...im wonder people from gym...they got legs and arms like Jean Claud Van Dame and by the way my dad is olso big man...not from gym but natural and when i gaved him racquet he play like a kid dont have power to hit and move like turtle...so why i should go to gym and get more muscles and get bigger if i wouldnt not have power?how to get like Bruce Lee! slim, fast? his hands were not that big and fat but when he hit he kills...so what is all about?hope somebody understand my question and about racquet my dad say hes not coach or sth but "good player wit win no matter which racquet same as bascetball player will throw the ball into basket in ever type of ball" sorry for my english but hope u will understand
    so can somebody answet straight about traning legs?
    - me to improve legs should i run or do knee bend? (im 19y old)

  2. #53
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    Footwork is the ability to get into the optimal hitting position.The optimal hitting position allows you to hit the largest variety of shots with power precision and deception.Once a shuttle gets behind you it is very difficult to hit a shot with precision or enough speed to be able to stay in the rally.Footwork in conjunction with good shots with good depth in the backcourt which push your opponent to the edge of reach is what makes footwork the real test of how consistent you are.There is no greater truth than that good shots have to go along with the footwork to follow them.I see all too often people who get good at hitting shots but who stand there and admire the shot rather than using footwork to cover possibility of the next return.Footwork if complete should allow you to get to most if not all shots .The power players often get taken out when somebody with good footwork consistently returns a shot or winner that the power player relies on against other players with inferior shots and footwork.Its easy to lose sight of where your game is when you are winning against less advanced players.I myself don't try to win by smashing when playing the weaker opponents but rather by using other shots which allow me to test my footwork.A drill or game which I play for fitness and footwork is where the only shots which you can hit are clears drops and net.It will test your fitness as well as tell you where your footwork is.
    bighook

  3. #54
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    Quote Originally Posted by wood_22_chuck
    I think you stopped Kwun's heart with that statement.

    -dave
    and thanks the rest of you for the CPR.

    as 604badder and others said, one will soon understand the importance of footwork as you encounter faster and faster opponent, with faster and more accurate shot placement.

  4. #55
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    Oops ... sry ... my bad . Thanks for correcting my big mistake And yeah ... I still have a lot to learn but at least now I know that footwork plays quite an important part in badminton ~ Thanks everyone !! I promise I wouldn't ever make the same mistake again ... that'll save people from having heart attacks

  5. #56
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    As you get older though, it is also important to have good skill shots, as it is just not possible to run around like 20 year olds.
    Agreed Badminton is a game of legs more than hands, but simulating in the mind to hit a shot everytime you get to a certain position is as important.

    For me, everytime there is a drop on my backhand side, I tend to clear it back everytime even though the opponent is on the baseline.
    In such a case a cross court drop would be a winner.

    In this case I am there, but just not making the right shot. Especially in singles making the right shot is as important, so you can recover and have time to get back to your center position. So you dont have to keep running around returning the shuttle back for an easy shot for the opponent.

  6. #57
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    Run around like 20-yr-olds? I think you have a misconception on what footwork means.

    There're several players 10 or 15 years older than I am, and they take one step to a shot, where I would take maybe THREE steps.

    -dave

  7. #58
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    If you play it right, you won't have to run. The only time you 'really' have to run is when you make a mistake and you have a huge distance to recover, even then most experienced players won't run in the traditional sense. Badders could be good runners (for training) but runners are not always good badders.

    Anyway, for those who's still fuzzy about the concept of badminton footwork. The objective is to cover the most court area with the least amount of steps. It doesn't mean increasing the width of your strides, but rather improve coverage by judicious positioning and faster recovery. When you get to the shuttle sooner than your opponent, he waits at your leisure.

    That's why age may not be much of an equaliser in recreational/casual games. Of course, competitive tournaments are something else.
    Last edited by cappy75; 03-01-2005 at 09:00 PM.

  8. #59
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    Much has been said about the importance, benefits and how underrated footwork is in badminton but little has been given as to how to perform and execute it. It's not simply running as fast as you can to make a shot/return, that's for sure. I got a piece of advice (and thought it'd be useful to share) to always take every shot/return with your final footstep on your right foot (for right handers and naturally the opposite for lefties). Your weight is thus resting on your right foot when you strike and good balance is created allowing faster recovery (Try doing it the other way around!). It's worked quite well for me...

  9. #60
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    Quote Originally Posted by Raphael
    Much has been said about the importance, benefits and how underrated footwork is in badminton but little has been given as to how to perform and execute it. It's not simply running as fast as you can to make a shot/return, that's for sure. I got a piece of advice (and thought it'd be useful to share) to always take every shot/return with your final footstep on your right foot (for right handers and naturally the opposite for lefties). Your weight is thus resting on your right foot when you strike and good balance is created allowing faster recovery (Try doing it the other way around!). It's worked quite well for me...
    Except for a forehand smash (clear or drop), you want to land on your left foot (legs switch in the air, with the shoulder rotation).

  10. #61
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    Default Footwork and training with Lee Jae Bok

    Just come back from an 'intense' training with Lee Jae Bok last weekend. I can only say I fully enjoyed it. We did alot of repetitive footwork ie.preparation for a drop and smashes etc,etc. I have been to a couple coaching sessions before at Milton Keynes many years ago but we were only taught on how to hit a shuttle and is all about having fun. There were not once mentioned on footwork. Mine are all self taught through studying on videos, website etc. I just wish I turned back the clock and attended to LJB's courses, earlier. Even though I am a qualified coach I thought I have my basics correct because that was how I was taught. For instance, I normally play doubles and have a universal grip plus I hold the racquet quite higher up. Lee told me you have to have time to switch to a forehand or backhand. I am still trying to adopt his Pan-handle style forehand grip of hitting which I find beneficial but finding it hard to switch.
    Having said that I normally tell my players it will get worst before it gets better!

    Robbie

  11. #62
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    Quote Originally Posted by cappy75
    Anyway, for those who's still fuzzy about the concept of badminton footwork. The objective is to cover the most court area with the least amount of steps. ...
    Don't forget about trying to get to areas around the court as quick and as fast as possible
    Last edited by tinkerbella122; 06-14-2005 at 04:53 PM.

  12. #63
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    Great advice! I'm glad I've come across this site. I have always wanted to buy a good racket never realizing the best and cheapest (it's even free) way to improve my game is just by working on my footwork. It had always been my problem even when I was still playing table tennis. The usual comments I hear regarding my play is that I'm lazy to move in court. I hope you could send me specific tips on footwork exercises.



    Quote Originally Posted by kwun
    here is my advice if you want to improve your game.

    unless you are using an old steel racket with fishing lines, buying a new racket will do you little good. perhaps you will get a small margin of improvement, but it will not give you that edge that you are looking for, and by the time you know that, you will be what, US$100 poorer.

    and no, if you can hit the birdie ok, then trying to improve the strength of your smash isn't going to make that much of a difference, it will be marginal, once again.

    the one and only thing that i recommend, is free, the only thing you sacrifice in getting this imho, pretty sizable improvement, is you need to spend the time to practice it.

    and what is it? the old saying, "if you can't get there, it doesn't matter how good you can hit the birdie." i recommend you practice your footwork.

    here is the rational why i recommend footwork. many people i have seen, and that's including myself, usually play in a open gym or with friend, playing games. or may be you will even try to spend time doing some drills, clears, drop, smash, etc. but hardly have much time to do footwork drills. and the reason for that is simple, footwork drills are not natural, you need to occupy your own side of the court, and your friends won't be able to play "with" you.

    besides, if there are ppl waiting for the court, i'd feel strange to have to take up the court. footwork is then the least practiced of all skills, and as a result, unless if you are natural for it, it will be the weakest part of many ppl's skillset.

    but footwork imho is the most important skill to have. i will say it again, "if you cannot get there, it doesn't matter how good you can hit the birdie." the collorary of that is that if you get there early, you have many more choices of shots to hit, you will have all the time to do your stroke, trick shots, you will be less pressuerd so you can have the choice to smash anywhere on the court, you can even peek at your opponent and see where the holes in their formation are, and the list goes on and on...

    furthermore, if you have good footwork, you spend less energy moving around the court, you don't need to lunge and bent down so much, you ended up having more reserved energy at the end, perhaps that will help you outlast your opponent...

    i have always known that footwork is important. but as the situation with gym i mentioned above, i never had the chance to practice it. now i have forced myself to spend more time practicing it. and the improvement is very apparent, many shots that i used to feel pressured and have trouble with, i am getting them with ease these days. i no longer feel like i am on the wrong foot all the time, and movement around the court is smoother than before.

    so, if you think a new racket or trying to increase the power of your smash is the next improvement you are looking for, think twice and go practice some footwork. if you really want to spend some money, go buy yourself a better fitting pair of badminton shoes..

    there ends the lesson, of the day....

  13. #64
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gollum
    Except for a forehand smash (clear or drop), you want to land on your left foot (legs switch in the air, with the shoulder rotation).
    Preparation and last foot step just before the striking action (shoulder rotation and arm swing) are still with right foot but soon as striking commences weight is shifting to the left foot positioned in front following the striking action. It's a natural motion that comes with instinct. Thanks for the input.

  14. #65
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    Quote Originally Posted by Raphael
    Preparation and last foot step just before the striking action (shoulder rotation and arm swing) are still with right foot but soon as striking commences weight is shifting to the left foot positioned in front following the striking action. It's a natural motion that comes with instinct. Thanks for the input.
    That is the so-called "step through" method of hitting overheads; Badminton England advise that this should be taught to beginners, because it is easier to coordinate than more advanced movements.

    Once a player is more experienced, they can adopt more effective movements that allow them to cope with more demanding situations. For the most effective recovery, all forehand overheads should be taken with both feet off the ground. The left (non-racket) foot moves backwards as the right foot comes forward; the player then lands on the left foot, closely followed by the right foot. This establishes a wide base, with the left foot behind the body and the right foot in front; the player can move forwards quickly and on balance.

    As a coach, I don't agree that the step-through movement is instinctive. These movements need to be taught, because they are not everyday movements and in my experience players do not usually acquire them without instruction. Some players find badminton movements and techniques more natural than others, but all require instruction and/or experimentation to perform well.
    Last edited by Gollum; 06-18-2005 at 06:15 AM.

  15. #66
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gollum
    That is the so-called "step through" method of hitting overheads; Badminton England advise that this should be taught to beginners, because it is easier to coordinate than more advanced movements.

    Once a player is more experienced, they can adopt more effective movements that allow them to cope with more demanding situations. For the most effective recovery, all forehand overheads should be taken with both feet off the ground. The left (non-racket) foot moves backwards as the right foot comes forward; the player then lands on the left foot, closely followed by the right foot. This establishes a wide base, with the left foot behind the body and the right foot in front; the player can move forwards quickly and on balance.

    As a coach, I don't agree that the step-through movement is instinctive. These movements need to be taught, because they are not everyday movements and in my experience players do not usually acquire them without instruction. Some players find badminton movements and techniques more natural than others, but all require instruction and/or experimentation to perform well.

    Now we are getting in business. Should be more of this stuff. The real 'how to' and anatomical dissection of footwork. I will try the leg switch and will take delivery of some training DVDs soon so hopefully I can improve my games. Please post more info on footwork of other shots (on top of the right foot in front). Thanks Gollum.

  16. #67
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    Default Getting rid of bad habit

    As a beginner, I kind of learned the basic footwork, but never took the time to practice. However, I also do believe that footwork helps you to get to where you want to move and prepare for the shot.

    I have one "major" problem though. Until recently, I never learned that my right foot is supposed to be in front (except receiving the serve) for the ready position since I'm a right-hander. Well, all along, I had my left foot in the front and it's very hard to for me to change. Any advice?

  17. #68
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    yep, i totally agree that footwork is important, because i myself am a player who can't run very long or extremely fast compared to others, so i use my work on footwork and get faster and and combined with hand skills i can get some wins. So i agree that usually it should be around 70% footwork and 30% hand skills

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