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Thread: Badminton Book

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    Default Badminton Book

    Although I know that it can't come close to replacing coaching, checking out a book on correct badminton play is something that I can actually afford. I've checked out a book called "Badminton: The Complete Practical Guide" by Pat Davis. It goes in-depth on proper technique, with diagrams and photos to clarify the written discriptions. It is by far the best badminton book available through my library.

    The only problem? The book was written in 1983 (before I was even born ). Now I imagine that nothing has really changed in the way the game is played since then. But of course I could be wrong. So I'm asking the folks here - have things changed? Should I use this book or discard it as outdated and obselete?

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    seeing as how i've never read the book, i wouldn't be able to give an answer that i am completely confident in....


    but, i believe you should read it so you gain more knowledge about the game... even if it isn't used today.... and hell, maybe if you use such old skewl tactics, you'll confuse the hell out of ur opponents! =)

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    Default I think footwork changed

    I am not really sure, but I've read somewhere that the footwork a lot of hte pros use today incorporate more of a hoping motion and less of a running motion. That's one thing I know that may have changed. I don't think much of anything else changes, it's just a matter of preference. I have seen a few x-professional players and they all have noticably "pro" techniques so I think you shouldn't worry about the book being old! However, I may be wrong don't take my post too seriously heh.

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    I've read that book but don't have a copy.

    It's quite a good book if you don't have other resources available, good club, coach etc. Enough to start learning from.

    Just keep an open mind on learning new things.

    If I remember correctly, that book has a good section on backhand serve and how to hold the shuttle to make the shuttle swing out wide.

    It also has a description of the 'S' serve.

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    If you think that book is old, I got another one by Judy Hashman. That's older by another ten years I think.

    It took me 9 months to get it from amazon.com when I ordered it a few years back.

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    I would imagine problem areas in books of that date:

    Backhand drop/clear etc: likely to be described with elbow pointing up at shuttle/ backhand grip with arm straightening upwards, likewise backhand drive may be with elbow snapping rather than forearm rotation and fingers hitting.

    Footwork, likely to describe falling onto racket leg with back foot sliding on side, rather than using more both legs to move and recover.

    Doubles defence may be shown with players only side on rather than close to facing shuttle

    forehand serve may be suggested for doubles, probably 1 in 100 top players now use this

    Any fitness tips are likely to be outdated: e.g. may suggest rolling neck to warm up (now considered unwise) , unlikely to include strength training with weights etc.


    I suggest obtaining a video by a current top coach Lee Jae Bok, PJB etc as a good starting point.

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    There has been a lot of references in BF postings to the training video by Lee Jae Bok. Does anyone know where one would go to get a copy?

    Thanks.

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    I have that book by Pat Davis, but much of the training and techniques are outdated based on technology changes in racquet and gear. Our latest racquets offer much more capability than the racquets described in Pat's (and mine) days and thus allows (demands) the new player to use these with better and quicker techniques.

    The principles for the most part are still consistent, but definitely if you are looking to train from that book, use Jake Downey - Excelling at Badminton. It is on-line and free for you to download. IMHO this is a much better closer to current day techiques that the Pat Davis. The one thing about the Pat Davis book is that it offers a section of history of the former stars of badminton for those of you curious types.

    I have a copy of the Lee Jae Bok video. He offers some further insite on and examples of speed and power techniques. It is a recommended must see. I'm not sure where my friend got the copy - but I do know a local fellow is distributing it here in Vancouver.

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    Originally posted by Cheung
    If you think that book is old, I got another one by Judy Hashman. That's older by another ten years I think.

    It took me 9 months to get it from amazon.com when I ordered it a few years back.
    mrs. badrad has one in her book closet from 1967 - "Sports Illustrated Badminton" by Frank Devlin and Rex Lardner.

    Here's a pix of the backhand stroke technique:
    Attached Images Attached Images  

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    this is from the Pat Davis book:
    Attached Images Attached Images  

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    Originally posted by dlp
    I suggest obtaining a video by a current top coach Lee Jae Bok, PJB etc as a good starting point. [/B]
    Where can I get the Lee Jae Bok video? Is it available online or from any filesharing programs (Edonkey, Kazaa, Neomodus etc.)?

    I got this from his website (http://www.liba-uk.co.uk/about-lee.html):

    "I think it all started with a Korean saying: people who play sports have no brain...".

    I know this is slightly off-topic, but it's an interesting assertion. Has anyone else wondered whether mental and physical exercise are incompatible? I should think that the average badminton player is more intelligent than the average footballer or American football player, but by devoting so much time to physical fitness there is less time to pursue more cerebral/academic interests and the mindset of such a person is slightly changed. Long sustained periods of thought are swapped for quick, instantaneous bursts of thought, where the mind is focused wholly on momentary planning and reactions. Conversely, those who live a sedentary lifestyle, devoting their time to study, wouldn't be able to achieve a sufficent degree of fitness to play at a reasonably high level. Does this sound like an empty truism?

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    I would suggest a video tutorial. it's visual, you can see a lot clearly on how the moves are executed and the feel. You don't have to burn your brows just to understand and comprehend a sentence and read it over and over again to make sure your not misinterprting what the book instructs. And best of all it's cheaper than books. Besides you can play it to your badminton buddies at your place and have them entertained.

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    Where on earth would I get a badminton video-tutorial? Even though Strathclyde has a much better badminton team than all the Scottish football teams, badminton is not a focus-sport in Scotland. Hardly any shops stock badminton equipment, never mind instructional videos.

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    The IBF online shop www.smashstore.com
    or
    The BAofE shop www.baofe.co.uk and choose SHOP from the list on the left

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    http://www.scotbadminton.demon.co.uk/ also have a range of coaching videos, although I think the sound quality is not as good because they are a bit home made, but the coahs include PJB, LJB.

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    Originally posted by armortec user
    I know this is slightly off-topic, but it's an interesting assertion. Has anyone else wondered whether mental and physical exercise are incompatible? I should think that the average badminton player is more intelligent than the average footballer or American football player, but by devoting so much time to physical fitness there is less time to pursue more cerebral/academic interests and the mindset of such a person is slightly changed. Long sustained periods of thought are swapped for quick, instantaneous bursts of thought, where the mind is focused wholly on momentary planning and reactions. Conversely, those who live a sedentary lifestyle, devoting their time to study, wouldn't be able to achieve a sufficent degree of fitness to play at a reasonably high level. Does this sound like an empty truism?
    I think a small part of it depends on how devoted the sports player is to their game. Professionals would most likely not have enough time to study, while more casual players who play badminton on the side can still pursue academics. So, while those entirely devoted to sports may not pursue academics, it may only be because they have no time. I don't think sports make you "dumber." Unless of course, it causes you to lose brain cells.

    I think a large part of this topic is your genetics. You're either born with it or you're not. Your upbringing has much to do with how you use yourself, but I think someone born with the ability to excel in athletics and an excellent mind will not lose the abilities over time. Of course, someone who lives a sedentary lifestyle which results in excessive weight gain must first lose that weight before they will be able to effectively use their athletic gifts. www.braintypes.com has interesting research in this area.

    Phil

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    Originally posted by armortec user
    Where on earth would I get a badminton video-tutorial? Even though Strathclyde has a much better badminton team than all the Scottish football teams, badminton is not a focus-sport in Scotland. Hardly any shops stock badminton equipment, never mind instructional videos.

    too bad i felt sorry for you dude no video tutorial there eh?... well you could always try the internet, surf for some video tutorials... besides videos are more exciting than books.

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