User Tag List

Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast
Results 1 to 17 of 21
  1. #1
    Regular Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Miami, FL
    Posts
    202
    Post Thanks / Like
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default Is it possible to untie the string and restring using that old string?

    just want to save money on restring.

  2. #2
    Regular Member Mark A's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Location
    St Helens, UK
    Posts
    3,746
    Post Thanks / Like
    Mentioned
    11 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by johnnxiv View Post
    just want to save money on restring.
    No - there won't be enough string to reach the machine's string gripper.

  3. #3
    New Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2012
    Location
    UK
    Posts
    1
    Post Thanks / Like
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default

    I'm not an expert on stringing, but I believe it may be possible to just replace those strings that have gone as opposed to re-stringing the whole racket (will need to use new string though). I presume this will depend upon where you have done a string, and the state/tension left in the strings that are still in one piece. (Someone correct me if I'm wrong!)

    This might save you some money in comparison to a full re-string.

  4. #4
    Regular Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Location
    Midwest USA
    Posts
    256
    Post Thanks / Like
    Mentioned
    3 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default

    As Mark posted, not really possible to re-tension the strings. Even if one could, undoing the weave is a nightmare.
    Last edited by mater; 03-24-2014 at 07:51 AM.

  5. #5
    Regular Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
    Location
    Canada
    Posts
    845
    Post Thanks / Like
    Mentioned
    8 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by johnnxiv View Post
    just want to save money on restring.
    Noppeee, but if you break a cross string I'm pretty sure you can patch it up.

  6. #6
    Moderator
    Join Date
    Apr 2002
    Location
    Outside the box
    Posts
    12,518
    Post Thanks / Like
    Mentioned
    27 Post(s)
    Tagged
    1 Thread(s)

    Default

    Yes. It is possible.

    Is it worth the effort? That would depend on the user.

    You have to do it handheld rather than in a machine. Tensioning is performed with a roller and wrapping the remaining string around it and turning. You lose a lot of tension when tying the knot. We used to use awls in the grommet to reduce the tension loss.

    When you use old strings to replace the two strings broken, the old strings might be notched or crimped a bit. This severely weakens the old strings and they may snap when being pulled tightly.

    You'll have to speak some of the oldies but it wasn't uncommon to see a person use white strings and have 2,3 or 4 strings in the middle with a different colour!

  7. Likes malayali liked this post
  8. #7
    Regular Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    Canada
    Posts
    305
    Post Thanks / Like
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default

    Solve the problem of not enough string by doing 1 less main/cross.

  9. #8
    Moderator
    Join Date
    Apr 2002
    Location
    Outside the box
    Posts
    12,518
    Post Thanks / Like
    Mentioned
    27 Post(s)
    Tagged
    1 Thread(s)

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Mark A View Post
    No - there won't be enough string to reach the machine's string gripper.
    I can tell you have never heard of hand stringing a racquet *sniff* LOL. What do they teach in schools nowadays?

  10. Likes Oldhand liked this post
  11. #9
    Regular Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    UK
    Posts
    153
    Post Thanks / Like
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by james001 View Post
    I'm not an expert on stringing, but I believe it may be possible to just replace those strings that have gone as opposed to re-stringing the whole racket (will need to use new string though). I presume this will depend upon where you have done a string, and the state/tension left in the strings that are still in one piece. (Someone correct me if I'm wrong!)

    This might save you some money in comparison to a full re-string.
    Yes it's possible, but not worth the hassle to save at most 5-6 metres of string. You're talking of saving maybe 2 (for reference, zymax costs around 4.50 a set, or just over 50 a reel). Then, you'll have some new and some old string in the racket which won't last as long (and might be worn out anyway - string loses repulsion over time).

    And that doesn't take into account the extra time it would take the stringer to carefully remove the broken string while leaving the unbroken behind...

  12. #10
    Regular Member Mark A's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Location
    St Helens, UK
    Posts
    3,746
    Post Thanks / Like
    Mentioned
    11 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Cheung View Post
    I can tell you have never heard of hand stringing a racquet *sniff* LOL. What do they teach in schools nowadays?
    Oh, I've heard of it... I just don't consider it "stringing".

  13. Likes Oldhand liked this post
  14. #11
    Regular Member dbswansea's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Location
    Swansea
    Posts
    738
    Post Thanks / Like
    Mentioned
    6 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Mark A View Post
    Oh, I've heard of it... I just don't consider it "stringing".
    I've recently restrung a couple of racquets for a club mate which were done by a respected local coach, they were both 3 piece, 6 knot jobs. All I could think was that they were botch jobs.

  15. Likes Oldhand liked this post
  16. #12
    Regular Member Mark A's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Location
    St Helens, UK
    Posts
    3,746
    Post Thanks / Like
    Mentioned
    11 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by dbswansea View Post
    I've recently restrung a couple of racquets for a club mate which were done by a respected local coach, they were both 3 piece, 6 knot jobs. All I could think was that they were botch jobs.
    I think it's a case of "gone are the days"; there's no reason not to do a full job nowadays.

  17. #13
    Moderator
    Join Date
    Apr 2002
    Location
    Outside the box
    Posts
    12,518
    Post Thanks / Like
    Mentioned
    27 Post(s)
    Tagged
    1 Thread(s)

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Mark A View Post
    Oh, I've heard of it... I just don't consider it "stringing".
    Back in the 80's , a full restring would cost 16quid. So just putting in a couple of strings was quite cost effective for social players. Even the stringing shop would offer the service. Gut would be around 24quid for the full restring.

    agree there is no need for it nowadays.
    Last edited by Cheung; 03-25-2014 at 04:21 AM.

  18. #14
    Regular Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    Canada
    Posts
    119
    Post Thanks / Like
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default

    It would probably be easier on the stringer and faster to restring the entire racquet. Doing a patch up job would make the strings feel extremely inconsistent mixing the old with the new.

  19. #15
    Moderator
    Join Date
    Apr 2002
    Location
    Outside the box
    Posts
    12,518
    Post Thanks / Like
    Mentioned
    27 Post(s)
    Tagged
    1 Thread(s)

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by _Rav_ View Post
    .....

    And that doesn't take into account the extra time it would take the stringer to carefully remove the broken string while leaving the unbroken behind...
    Actually, it's a non-issue. So long as it is a string broken in one place, it's very easy and fast to tension and then tie off the strings. Then replace the missing strings with new strings. If old strings from another racquet were to be used instead, the strings will more than likely break during the pulling process.

    The beautiful advantage was that the repair kit takes up very little space in the bag and so the repair would be able to be done during a club night. The owner of the racquet wouldn't need to wait for the weekend to take it to the shop for a full restring and then only be able to pick it up during the next weekend. Now that stringing machines are more commonly around, the repair job has fallen out of fashion.

    Quote Originally Posted by Cillu View Post
    It would probably be easier on the stringer and faster to restring the entire racquet. Doing a patch up job would make the strings feel extremely inconsistent mixing the old with the new.
    It's not faster to restring the whole racquet. The main issue is tension loss. More of a problem with present modern racquets when people string their racquets above 22 lbs fairly frequently.

  20. #16
    Administrator kwun's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2002
    Location
    Santa Clara, California, United States
    Posts
    35,346
    Post Thanks / Like
    Mentioned
    43 Post(s)
    Tagged
    2 Thread(s)

    Default

    around 2/3 the cost of a stringjob is the labor cost. so if you are not a stringer and you were to perform this yourself, then you could save a lot of money. however, there will be massive tension loss as a result, from both the now slack stringbed as well as hand wound tension.

    if you are a stringer and you have a machine, a stringjob is just cost of the string, then it is a no brainer to forget it and restring the whole thing, that $2 saving is not worth it.

    however, if you were to ask your stringer to do that for you, i don't know if anyone would do it. i'd just tell whoever i will charge full price for the patch job, likely it will be more painful to deal with the slack string than to string the whole thing, and i don't even want to give a racket back to my client with such uneven tension.

  21. #17
    Regular Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2012
    Location
    Netherlands
    Posts
    26
    Post Thanks / Like
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by kwun View Post
    however, if you were to ask your stringer to do that for you, i don't know if anyone would do it. i'd just tell whoever i will charge full price for the patch job, likely it will be more painful to deal with the slack string than to string the whole thing, and i don't even want to give a racket back to my client with such uneven tension.
    Not to mention that the previous string will have kinks all over the place where it needed to make sharp turns on the grommets... Pretty sure you won't line those spots up on the new stringjob...

Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •