User Tag List

Results 1 to 13 of 13
  1. #1
    Regular Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    HK
    Posts
    4,212
    Mentioned
    7 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default Breathing and Stamina

    how does breathing and stamina correlate?

    does shallow breathing reduce stamina?

  2. #2
    Regular Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Location
    singapore
    Posts
    816
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default

    yes proper breathing technique is important for all sports.. not only badminton

  3. #3
    Regular Member visor's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    Vancouver, BC
    Posts
    10,112
    Mentioned
    136 Post(s)
    Tagged
    1 Thread(s)

    Default

    It's a matter of physiology. The respiratory dead space of airways conduction is around 150ml. So if you don't effectively move much more than that per breath then you won't be getting any oxygen into your lungs. http://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dead_space_(physiology)

  4. #4
    Regular Member craigandy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Location
    UK
    Posts
    1,856
    Mentioned
    18 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by visor View Post
    It's a matter of physiology. The respiratory dead space of airways conduction is around 150ml. So if you don't effectively move much more than that per breath then you won't be getting any oxygen into your lungs. http://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dead_space_(physiology)
    Thats an interesting read thanks for referencing that. Although in practice this does not seem to make any sense. For instance it implies that if you only take deep breaths you will be better but if i tried to do that whilst seriously out of breath running around i would probably faint. What am i missing??

  5. #5
    Regular Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Location
    Toronto
    Posts
    337
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default

    In short, having proper breathing intervals can increase your stamina.
    The converse is true as well. When your stamina is low (you're completely spent) doing proper breathing techniques can help you recover.

    It's actually a measure of your athleticism.
    I believe it's called cardio recovery time.

    This is what pro boxers and fighters train to improve because they have to go almost 100% cardio capacity for 3-5 minutes and then only have 30s-1 minute to rest and recover.
    If you watch carefully what these athletes do, you'll notice that they focus intently on taking long deep breaths and lowering their heart rate.
    Recovery time is measured as how much time it takes to take your heart rate to go from higher intensity to your basal (resting) rate.
    Doing interval training or even high intensity interval training (HIIT) will help your recovery speed.

    Translating this to badminton terms:
    Imagine playing a very physical, long rally.
    You only have a short amount of time to recover your heart rate to play the next rally. Usually about 30 seconds before you are warned about delay of game by the umpire.

    For me, I do interval training to help with my cardio recovery. I also do some anaerobic exercise to train my muscles to be more oxygen efficient. During training, I would also do some exercises that are similar to yoga breathing techniques. This is mainly learning to focus on your breathing (almost to a meditative state) and then focus on slowing your heart rate. All this is to build the habit that I can use in real match conditions. Practicing the breathing technique to the point where I can automatically turn it on even in stressful playing conditions.

    A technique to use as a last resort... only in emergencies when you've played to a point of near exhaustion and cannot rest (during tournaments etc)...

    Make bigger slower movements so that you are not expending a lot of explosive energy, then as you are about to hit, inhale deeply and exhale as you make the stroke. This is especially useful in doing overhead clears in doubles games.

    Having a high cardio capacity means you are more efficient with your oxygen (requires less heavy breathing) and means you have high stamina.
    An indicator of fitness/cardio capacity (relates to breathing and stamina, see above) is your heart rate.
    If you can lower your resting heart rate to around 50-55, it would mean you will be able to handle most recreational intermediate badminton standards.
    As a reference, my average heart rate is 45-50. It takes me about one minute to go from 120 bpm to 60-70 bpm.

  6. #6
    Regular Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    HK
    Posts
    4,212
    Mentioned
    7 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default

    thank you all for replying. I have three follow up questions:

    Question (1):

    The Wikipedia article says

    "About a third of every resting breath has no change in O2 and CO2 levels. In adults, it is usually in the range of 150 mL.

    Because of dead space, taking deep breaths more slowly (e.g. ten 500 mL breaths per minute) is more effective than taking shallow breaths quickly (e.g. twenty 250 mL breaths per minute). Although the amount of gas per minute is the same (5 L/min), a large proportion of the shallow breaths is dead space, and does not allow oxygen to get into the blood.
    "


    So for shallow breaths, it's not one third, right? It's more than one third?

    Question 2:

    So it is 150ml which remains the same? not the one third ratio?

    Question 3:

    Is it better to breath through the mouth or the nose?
    Last edited by pcll99; 03-04-2012 at 10:54 PM.

  7. #7
    Regular Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Location
    Toronto
    Posts
    337
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default

    I also play the alto saxophone.

    That video can help you increase your lung capacity.
    As with a balloon, your lung is made of soft tissue that can stretch. You can effectively train your lung so that it can hold more air. You can also strengthen your diaphragm in such a way that you can suck in a greater volume of air in one breath. Doing this will greatly improve your stamina as each breath you take will have give your body more oxygen (purely based on volume).

    Part of the technique shown in the video (the first step: exhaling) can help you expel all the "old air" in your system.
    By contracting your diaphragm completely, you can expel very close to all the "old air" and draw in "new air" and effectively eliminating the "dead space". Doing this will greatly change the oxygen/carbon dioxide levels in your system.

    Also, Q1 and 2 really doesn't have much to do with improving your performance. But I'll answer it anyways to help your understanding.

    But Q1 = yes, because the short breath has lesser volume and therefore it is a larger portion... ie. more than 1/3

    Q2 the 150 mL dead space volume is a rough estimate of the dead space that does not affect the oxygen/carbon dioxide levels in your body. But what the paragraph is saying is that by taking the deeper breaths, you are able to reach deep into the dead space and exchange that volume of air. Whereas the shallower breaths only scratch and replace the surface volume of air. (Go back and read the expelling the "old air" portion)

    Q3, ALWAYS in through the nose and out the mouth. This way is the most efficient way to breathe. You will find many endurance athletes (marathon runners, 1200m runners etc) and explosive athletes (sprinters, swimmers) all breathe this way. It is important to know that the breathing exercise in the video isn't about breathing efficiently but to increase lung capacity.

  8. #8
    Regular Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Location
    Toronto
    Posts
    337
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default

    crap... disregard the exhale part...
    lemme find another video about exhalation...

  9. #9
    Regular Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Location
    Toronto
    Posts
    337
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default







    There... those videos validate what I told you before.
    As you can tell, I've done a lot of research.
    Last edited by b.leung; 03-04-2012 at 11:52 PM.

  10. #10
    Regular Member visor's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    Vancouver, BC
    Posts
    10,112
    Mentioned
    136 Post(s)
    Tagged
    1 Thread(s)

    Default

    ^^Q1 to 3: Perfect answers! Couldn't have said it better myself.

  11. #11
    Regular Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    HK
    Posts
    4,212
    Mentioned
    7 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default

    wa! All very useful information.

    I will study your answers and reflect on them. Hope you won't mind if i have more questions later.

  12. #12
    Regular Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Location
    Toronto
    Posts
    337
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default

    Since, you're in HK
    It'll be good to do some hiking in the mountains to build the some cardio at altitude.

  13. #13
    Regular Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    HK
    Posts
    4,212
    Mentioned
    7 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default

    i have a tendency of holding my breath while concentrating. i shouldn't do that, right?

Similar Threads

  1. Breathing technique
    By chibe_K in forum Techniques / Training
    Replies: 46
    : 10-07-2011, 10:02 AM
  2. Breathing when you hit a hard shot
    By visor in forum Techniques / Training
    Replies: 18
    : 03-13-2010, 09:10 PM
  3. Breathing problems...
    By mightymuscle in forum Chit-Chat
    Replies: 21
    : 11-28-2008, 08:52 AM
  4. Footwork and breathing
    By carlo in forum Techniques / Training
    Replies: 2
    : 01-04-2008, 11:53 AM
  5. Victor (Breathing)
    By Timbuctoo in forum Clothing & Footwear
    Replies: 4
    : 10-31-2007, 04:31 PM

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •