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  1. #1
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    Default Badminton Training Drills

    Hello,

    I would like to get together Bc members (players, coachers, trainers) on this thread to share Badminton Drills that your players are doing during the training. Some coaches i believe are very sensitive and they prefer to have their drills exclusive only to his players or his team but for me my belief is we should share drills so that players will benefit from these and we keep on improving and also break the monotonous drills that players will get bored or tired of so they stop coming for training.

    These drills are sometimes use on the training session itself sometimes they are like already a rountine and they become automatic part already. But i believe modifying some drills after such a time will make players enjoy more the training.

    So let us share badminton drills here, post video or just description is fine.

    Let me start with some, i know these are already being done by some good players and coaches by i hope that others can benefit also.

    1) Flat Drives
    This is a common routinary drill that everyone knows.
    Set-up: Half Court
    Players : 2 ( Midcourt, MC of each half court)

    2) Variation of #1, when players are 3.
    Set-up: Whole court
    Players: 3, 2 Players on one side (MC) and 1 Player on other side (center of MC).
    Then every two minutes each player can rotate until all 3 players are done.

    3) Attack and Defense:
    Set-up: Half Court
    Players : 2 (1P front court, FC, stepping on service line and 1P 3/4 rear court(1 step backwards from MC area).

    Player in FC strokes are downward tap (always racket up).

    Player in 3/4RC strokes are defensive stroke more of racket moving sideways or diagonallly (like a topspin stroke of pingpong) so as shuttle will not fly very high. Should only skim the net.

    4) Variation of #3 when there are 3 players.
    Set-up: Whole Court
    Players : 3
    1P : Defense (center in 3/4RC)
    2P : Attackers ( FC area)

    Two attackers and 1 defender, same strokes as #3.

    5) Variation of #4
    Set-up Whole court
    Players: 3
    1P: Attacker (FC)
    2P: Denfenders (3/4 RC).

    #4 and #5 can be initially done with shuttle coming to the players straight to them and once then can also create some angles to replies so players will move side to side (with body twists.).

    So there you go. Those are just some of the drills that were doing for our players and i know for most people there are so many questions about these as i may not fully explained these well so just posts your quesitons or pm me if anyone have questions.

    Appreciate if others also can share so that we keep giving our players new set-ups activities to do so they can enjoy every training session.

  2. #2
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    Default Drills for Double : Offensive

    Hi there,

    I've posted this drill and hope it can benefit for those who wants to improve their offensive department particularly in double. The thread can be found here at :
    http://www.badmintoncentral.com/foru...ive?highlight=

    However, I'm again writing it back here for you guys for further reference.

    -----------------------------------------------------------------------------

    1. Introduction

    For sure most of you currently or had the opportunity to go for coaching classes either with a personal coach or with certain clubs that provide coaching classes. However, maybe there are some of you as well never had the opportunity to join any structured coaching classes also. Having a badminton coach is a very important element that plays a major role as they can guide you to improve how you play badminton and part of the coaching module that you will need to go through is doing a lot of badminton drills.

    Badminton drills is an important part of any coaching module and if a player wants to improve how he plays, just playing alone even with a better player will not necessarily will improve how you play. Therefore, a player MUST allocate certain amount of time to train himself multiple badminton drills since this can play a huge contribution towards achieving that goal be it with your coach or with your friend.

    2. Drill

    Badminton drills can be divided into 2 that are non-shuttlecock drill, a type of drill that doesn’t use shuttlecocks and shuttlecock drill that is a type of drill that uses shuttlecocks. The presentation of any of this drills to you will depends on how does your coach wants.

    If you have an opportunity to further polish how you play with your friends, then again practicing the drills that you’ve learned from your coach will be the best training approach that you can do. Since there are numerous type of drills that a player can follow then here we will discuss a type of drill that you can practice if you have any opportunity to do it.

    3. Badminton Drill for Double – Offensive

    If you’re a double player, improving the quality of your attacking and learning how to constantly remain on offensive mode is one of the key to achieve victory while playing. Therefore, it is very important to learn and improve the quality of your attacking and also learn and improve how to remain on constant offensive mode in order to keep that continuous pressure towards your opponent. This next drill will improve all of the above aspect.

    3.1 Requirement

    - 3 player requirement
    Player 1 = your friend
    Player 2 = Front court player
    Player 3 = Back court player

    3.2. Objective
    - To improve the quality of your attacking from the point of control and placement.
    - To improve player’s creativity to decide what are the best offensive options to do once the opportunity presented to him.
    - To learn how to constantly maintain the offensive mode towards your opponent.
    Therefore:
    (i) For front court player (player 2)
    - Need to learn how to cover the full length of the front court and perform a good net play without making any unforced error
    - Need to learn how to cover the full length of the front court and anticipate any weak return and make a kill if any opportunity presented to him
    (ii) For back court player (player 3)
    - Need to learn how to cover the full length of the back court and at the same time remaining constantly on offensive mode without making any unforced errors
    - While on offensive mode, player 3 needs to critically learn to decide what is the best type of offensive to perform in order to break player 1 defenses.
    - While performing an attack, players 3 also need to learn how to accurately place his attack in order to break player 1 defenses

    3.3. Method

    A. General Rule

    Player 2 (Front court) and Player 3 (Back court)
    (i) For player 2 and 3, this is full court coverage with a half court offensive drill. Therefore,
    - While covering full court (Picture 1), player 2 (front court player) can only do a front court hit to player 1 to his half sided court only according to which half side of the court the birdie is sent by player 1. No crosscourt hit is allowed
    - Similarly, while covering full court (Picture 1), player 3 (backcourt player) can only do a back court hit to player 1 to his half sided court only according to which half side of the court the birdie is sent by player 1. No crosscourt hit is allowed
    The purpose to narrow the coverage of direction of all the offensive hits from player 2 and 3 into only player 1 half court is:
    - For frontcourt player (player 2), this will allow him to learn and improve the quality of his shot in a restricted given area.
    - For backcourt player (player 3), this will allow him to learn to decide what is the best type of shots to perform and improve the quality of that shot in order to break player 1 defenses in a restricted given area.
    (ii) Player 2 and 3 CANNOT perform any lift or clear at any circumstances. The objective of this drill is to improve the qualities of your offensive.

    Player 1
    (i) Player 1 will only cover the half side of the court (picture 1) according to which half side of the court the birdie is sent by player 1 or to which side of the court the birdie is currently being played.
    (ii) Even though player 1 only covers the half side of his court, all of his frontcourt and backcourt hit can be directed to any direction into player 2 and 3 frontcourt and back court area.
    (iii) Player 1 can only do a front court net play or block (straight or crosscourt) or a lift (straight or crosscourt) to either player 2 or 3.
    (iv) Player 1 cannot do any attacking towards player 2 or 3. He needs to be on defensive mode to allow player 2 and 3 learn all the qualities there are while on offensive mode.



    Picture 1

    B. The Drill

    (i) The Activity

    Drill 1 : Start
    - Player 2 starts by making the same exact low serve like how you play in double to the player 1 ( Picture 2 : 2a)


    Picture 2

    - Player 1 has the option to perform either any of the below hits to player 2 or player 3 (picture 3):
    Straight net: 1a
    Straight lift: 1b
    Crosscourt net: 1c
    Crosscourt lift: 1d



    Picture 3

    Drill 2: The Drill

    - If player 1 decides to do a straight net (Picture 3 : 1a), player 2 is only allowed to perform any of this hit (Picture 4: 2a):
    A net play
    A net kill, if it’s a weak return or a weak net play from player 1


    Picture 4

    - Similarly, if player 1 decides to do a crosscourt net play (Picture 3: 1c), player 2 is only allowed to perform the similar any of the above hit but only into the other side of player 1 court where the birdie is being played (Picture 4: 2b)
    - If player 1 decides to do a straight lift (Picture 3: 1b) to player 3, then player 3 must decide wisely what are the attacking options (picture 5) stated below that he needs to perform:
    A Smash ( 3a)
    A half smash (3a)
    A drop (3b)



    Picture 5

    - Similarly, if player 1 decides to do a crosscourt lift (picture 3: 1d), then player 3 must decide wisely what are the attacking options (picture 5 : 3c or 3d) that has been stated above that he needs to perform but only into the other side of player 1 court where the birdie is being played

    (ii) Key notes

    Below are the key area that a player needs to emphasize while performing this drill:

    Player 2 (front court player)
    - Always hold the racket head level high. This will allow a quicker response to address the birdie.
    - Always stay focus and alert on the trajectory of the birdie. This is to avoid to be easily deceive
    - Address the birdie as early as possible. This will ensure a good net play can be done. The earlier you address the birdie, the chance of a good net play is higher and any errors done can be reduced since the height resistance the birdie needs to travel over the net cord is low. If there are any opportunities make a kill if any chances appear.
    - Rather than waiting for the birdie to come, always move forward to create a constant threatening front court appearance to player 1
    - If your net play or drive is good, don’t hesitate to make a follow through along the net line to anticipate a kill.

    Player 3 (Back court player)
    - Always hold the racket head level high. This will allow a quicker response to address the birdie.
    - Move ahead of the birdie. This is to ensure a more optimal physical position while addressing the birdie, unloading a more satisfactory hit
    - Try to learn millisecond before making any attack, train your peripheral vision and make a glance look at player 1 and notice his defense readiness and stance location. This information can provide you input to decide what the best offensive to do.
    If his defense readiness is low (racket head level is low), do a body smash
    If his defense readiness is well prepared, maintain your offensive mode by making a few drop shot or half smash to take any possible opportunities to mount a smash if his defense readiness is suddenly low
    - Be variable with your attacking to make it unpredictable. This also will allow you to lower your opponent defensive readiness thus making a higher chance of scoring a point once a smash being done
    - Prefabably only smash when the opportunity comes. In any case, if you’re a smash freak, and your opponent is well prepared, go for the sideline.
    - While attacking (especially smashing), emphasize first the priority to make sure that the placement of the birdie goes in into your opponent court according to the area of your intention rather igniting it initially with power. This will reduce from making unforced errors. Go for power once the opportunities stated above appears and you’re in optimal attacking position. No point to have a powerful smash but most of it goes out or end up into the net.

    (iii) Post Assessment

    After performing this drill, assess yourself the following areas:
    Player 2
    - Are you constantly holding your racket head level high?
    - Are you constantly addressing the birdie as early as possible while on full front court coverage?
    - Are you able to focus on the trajectory of the birdie and avoid being deceived by player 1?
    - For any given net play from player 1, are you making more good net play (90 – 100%) as to compare to unforced errors?
    - Do you make a follow through for any good net play played and make a kill for any opportunities that comes to you?
    - Ask to player 1, does he feels that your front court appearances is constantly dominance and threating?

    Player 3
    - Are you constantly holding your racket head level high?
    - Are you constantly comfortable addressing the birdie while on full back court coverage?
    - For any given attack you’ve done, are you making more valid attack (90-100%) as to compare to unforced errors?
    - Are your making variable attacking options and making good points from your smashes once the opportunities comes?

    All the above answer should be YES

    Hopefully this drill can improve how you play double and again, in any opportunity that you have, allocate some time and do this drill or whatever drill that you've already learned so that you can improve how you play badminton.

    SS

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