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  1. #1
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    Default Choice of equipment? (ease of use)

    I haven't been stringing for at least 18 years. Back then, I strung using a friends machine, usually a couple of times per month, stringing 1-5 rackets each time. Maybe I've strung 3-400 rackets total.

    After a long break of not playing (15+ years), I've found my way to the courts again, now my sons are also playing. And with the harder string tensions now compared to 20 years ago, we're going through 10-15 sets of strings each season. As the kids grow older, play more and hits harder, this number is not going down.

    So I'm considering buying a stringing machine for myself, but in particular for my 15 year old son, who's playing 4-5 days a week now, and needs some kind of "job" or minor income & responsibility - I thought I could learn him to string, and he would maybe string 2-3 rackets per week initially. Maybe in a year, he'd be stringing a lot more, but not initially... I'd just be stringing my own rackets.

    So, here goes my questions:
    1. Considering the low number of strings initially, and that it will be my son stringing (15y), would you recommend to go for a weight, wheel or electronic machine? My thoughts are to avoid wheels, they're probably most difficult to use, and when stringing only 3 a week, you don't need the speed.
    2. Is "a better machine" also easier to use, or simply just more sturdy and better supporting the frame? (We'll not be stringing extremely hard. I suppose max. 13 kg, typically 10-11 kg).
    3. For a non-expert stringer such as my son, would you recommend any particular tools (especially clamps) or methods? I'm thinking ease of use and consistency in the stringing, until he gets the hang of it.
    4. When I strung, some strings were more difficult to string correctly, mainly because of the coating/surface of the strings - some burned easily. Are there any strings today, that are either easier to string quickly, or a pain to string? I've never strung NBG strings or the new flavours of BG strings (power, ultimax, etc).


    The machines I have in mind are these:

    • Pro's Pro Challenge or Premium 3600 (if weight)
    • Pro's Pro XP Plus (if wheel)
    • Pro's Pro TX700 (if electr.)
    • Or spend an additional $300 and go for the Premium 8700, which should be a better machine as far as I understand.


    I'd be thankful if anyone has experience with the above machines or any ther input for my consideration.

    Cheers,
    The FeatherBlaster

  2. #2
    Administrator kwun's Avatar
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    always nice to hear someone coming back to badminton after a long break, esp when it involves younger generation.

    10-15 sets of string every season isn't too much. your savings compared to going to a shop is going to be US$300 (equivalent) per season. however, if you add to that any stringing job that he pulls in, that will be substantial.

    how many string jobs do you expect? each one you can easily earn US$10 (equiv), and if he can do just 10 a month, that's mean the machine will pay for itself in a year. that's not bad really. and 10 a month can be easily done if he play so much because that means he has enough friends.

    to answer your questions:

    1. electronic is easiest to use, and then crank (wheel) and then drop weight. if you can afford it, electronic is the way to go. electronic machine give a much more consistent string job.
    2. a good machine will be more sturdy, support the racket better, and have better quality clamps.
    3. there are various stringing methods, honestly in terms of difficulty, the simple yonex pattern is the best to learn, and you can go to youtube video and just look at people stringing. here is one that i posted: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JQfawkdNXYQ . you just need to look at more and the process is pretty easy to follow.
    4. thinner stiffer strings are easier than thick sticky strings. I do many BG80 and that's probably one of the easier string to do.

  3. #3
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    Thanks a lot for your prompt reply.
    As for the financials, I'm not worried, except I'll not be throwing money out the window on machines more expensive than the ones suggested, because of the limited number of strings. 10 per month is a good guess initially. We're playing in a big club with many members and only a couple stringing. Two of those who strung most has just stopped. And there's also recreational players in a arena just 1k from where we live.
    Here a stringer typically makes $13-15 pr string by the way.

    Well my only question left now is:
    Pro's Pro TX700 - is that simply too cheap a machine, even for that number of strings (10/month)
    Would you have to go for a better one if it should be eletronic?

    Thanks,
    FB

  4. #4
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    Hi there,

    I'd suggest you narrow your choice down, which comes to personal preference of either:
    1) Pro's Pro Challenger - table top, dropweight, constant pull
    or
    2) XP Plus - crank, comes on a stand, not constant pull.

    Regardless of the above option you choose, you can always save money towards upgrading the machine in the future with:
    -new side supports -> Michal Supports to be specific. Relatively inexpensive and heavily reviewed in the forum
    -Add an electronic tensioner -> you can always buy a Wise2086 to turn that manual machine into an electronic
    -better fixed clamps.

    This allows you to have your kids and yourself to get your feet wet with stringing. If you or your kids enjoy stringing, continue playing or the amount of rackets you string per month increase than the increased volume of rackets should cover the cost of upgrading your machine to an electronic by purchasing the Wise 2086.

    Hope this helps.
    Last edited by DarthHowie; 10-23-2014 at 11:00 PM.

  5. #5
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    This!

    I have the Premium3600 (by recommendation from Robin at http://www.wdstrings.co.uk/)
    But PP Challenger would probably do as good...

    Definitely by the supports from Michal Sudek, it was a revelation for me!

    I invested about 4500-5000 SEK for the Premium3600, 1 roll = 200m BG80, Sudek supports, WA3342 clamps (all incl. P&P from England and Polen!)

    I made a very conservative calculation to break even in two years. Including money saved for 12-15 stringjobs/year for my personal rackets which otherwise would cost 200SEK/each. Plus I only expected to do 1 string job/month (12/year) for paying customers = friends I play with. And then I was charging a very low but reasonable fee, 80SEK for the work plus string cost estimated to 40SEK = 120SEK/stringing.

    Now I think I'm a bit better as a stringer and charge 150SEK which is all money in my pocket (- string 40SEK).

    With 10 paying string jobs/month you will have covered your investment in about 6 month! If you and your kids continue playing I think this is money you could use to buy an Wise as an upgrade.

    HTH / mats


    Quote Originally Posted by DarthHowie View Post
    Hi there,

    I'd suggest you narrow your choice down, which comes to personal preference of either:
    1) Pro's Pro Challenger - table top, dropweight, constant pull
    or
    2) XP Plus - crank, comes on a stand, not constant pull.

    Regardless of the above option you choose, you can always save money towards upgrading the machine in the future with:
    -new side supports -> Michal Supports to be specific. Relatively inexpensive and heavily reviewed in the forum
    -Add an electronic tensioner -> you can always buy a Wise2086 to turn that manual machine into an electronic
    -better fixed clamps.

    This allows you to have your kids and yourself to get your feet wet with stringing. If you or your kids enjoy stringing, continue playing or the amount of rackets you string per month increase than the increased volume of rackets should cover the cost of upgrading your machine to an electronic by purchasing the Wise 2086.

    Hope this helps.
    Last edited by wirre; 10-24-2014 at 09:02 AM.

  6. #6
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    I personally use Victor C7026 + 2086, my teammates are using EAGNAS 209 + 2086, this combination is enough for your needs, and also save money, but also save time.

  7. #7
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    Thanks a lot for all your inputs!

    Not sure if I've ever seen Victor machines for sale here, the pro's pros and premiums I can get locally at very good prices.

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